Evolution coming early to England – addition of evolution to the primary curriculum

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Evolution is to be added to the primary national curriculum in England, gratifying scientists and educators who have been campaigning for its addition over the last three years. In 2009, the British Humanist Association coordinated a letter (PDF) from top scientists and science educators in Britain calling for the addition of evolution to the primary curriculum. Although the government indicated in 2009 that evolution would indeed be added as part of the reform of the primary national curriculum called for by the Children, Schools, and Families bill, the relevant part of the bill was tabled in Parliament in 2010. Then in September 2011, as NCSE reported, a group of scientists renewed the call for evolution to be taught “at both primary and secondary levels in the National Curriculum and in all schools.”


continue to source article at ncse.com

23 COMMENTS

  1. Finally! I remember asking my teachers when we would learn about evolution (and dinosaurs, if I only listened to my teachers I wouldn’t have known they existed until high school) in about year 4 after reading about it. About bloody time. Only a couple of hundred years late.

  2. Evolution is to be added to the primary national curriculum in England,
    gratifying scientists and educators who have been campaigning for its
    addition over the last three years. In 2009,

    This is simply adding evolution to the statutory curriculum to require all schools (apart from politically exempted nutters) to teach it.  Most competent teachers of science have been teaching it anyway, except in some “Faith Schools”, and even there it has often been taught as “theistic evolution” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C… or as part of a “controversy”.

    I was teaching evolution as part of biology, astronomy and incidentally 40 years ago.

  3. I must have heard about Evolution at my C of E primary school in Suffolk, some 60 years ago. What I do remember is that in the first few weeks at grammar school, the history teacher (!!!!) started by teaching us about the Theory.  It made perfect sense then and I never questioned it – which is just as well since I make my living as a palaeontologist.

  4.   cheesedoff17 –
    Shameful, that in Darwin’s homeland, scientists should have to fight for this in 2012.

    @OP:twitter  – Evolution is to be added to the primary national curriculum in England,

    For those not familiar with UK schools, “PRIMARY” is usually 4+ years old to 11 Years old.  Evolution has been taught to older children for years in most schools, and often taught to “Primary” ages incidentally, although not previously required in the statutory curriculum.

  5. Better late than never. I was lucky, my father told me about evolution and regularly took me to the Natural History museum in Manchester when I was a boy of eight or nine. That’s where I learned about fossils and began to appreciate the idea of geological time. Concurrently I was treated to the world of Adam and Eve at my C of E primary school. Geology won. Thanks Dad.

  6. This way around this might be to lobby the BBC to produce a miniseries for youngsters about evolution with full pizazz.  This would trump some dull classroom lesson in creationism.
    It might even have fun ridiculing creationism, using cartoons — to emphasise this is just a cartoon story.

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