EBay Bans Magic Potions, Curses, Spells

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Looking a for a spell that will make your partner lust for you and only you? Or a black magic revenge incantation to curse your enemy? Or maybe a good old-fashioned $51 demon-obliterating potion that promises to “destroy heavy demonic energies, entities, beings and forces” is all you need.


Come September, though, you’ll no longer find these quick fixes on eBay. Beginning Aug.30, the online auction site will ban the sale of curses, spells, hexes, magic, prayers, blessing services, magic potions, healing sessions and more.

Perhaps it’s the intangibility of hexes and curses that makes them tough to host. “EBay regularly reviews categories and updates our policies based on customer feedback,” a statement from the company read. “We are discontinuing a small number of categories within the larger metaphysical subcategory, as buyers and sellers have told us that transactions in these categories often result in issues that can be difficult to resolve.”

But the ban on magic potions and curses has some users up in arms. One, writing on the eBay forum, even called the ban discriminatory.

Written By: Lyneka Little
continue to source article at abcnews.go.com

30 COMMENTS

  1.  Some guy in Rome wearing long robes can wave his hand over some water and imbue it with something, and then it’s very ‘powerful?’ How is that different from any other magical item previously sold on ebay?…”

    They have a point… It would be interesting to see eBay ban those sorts of things as well.

  2. “Or maybe a good old-fashioned $51 demon-obliterating potion that promises to “destroy heavy demonic energies, entities, beings and forces” is all you need.”

    according to available evidence, this product seems to be 100% effective

  3. Curses, a pox on ye eBay!  My cat was thinking of selling a few of her nine lives to a needy feline, if the price is right.

    Is astrology – I mean astro-graphing – still available?  My planets are out of whack, ouch.

  4. This seems to me to be purely a monetary decision.  The chances someone will complain after buying a charm and finding it didn’t work are fairly high compared to the chances someone will complain about holy water. These complaints cost eBay time and money.

  5. Magical demon destroyer potion $51

    Jes take an eye dropper full and pop a couple of drops on the pesky demon when the little critter ain’t payin’ attention and POW!  Then just call up the cleaners to scrape up all the demonic detritus and give the place a nice smell.

    Says it all!  Einstein was right, human stupidity is infinite and so is the ‘capacity’ for deception.

  6. I disagree with the ban. Partly because I think idiots deserve to lose their money but also because maybe, just maybe, some of those who lose their money will see the light and start to recognise bunkum when they come across it.

  7. Do people still use eBay? The last time I did it was for an ultrasound printer and when the package came, there was a homemade-looking jar of cherry jam included. Maybe it was a magic potion? I didn’t eat it. :-j

    Mike

  8. The potions to protect you from demons and zombies reminds me of a very old joke.

    A was snapping his fingers constantly.

    B said to A, “why are you snapping your fingers all the time?”

    A said “To keep away the elephants.”

    B said “But there are no elephants around here.”

    A said “See, it works!”

  9. Uhm, no. The whole idea of homeopathy — that somehow ingesting a few molecules of a substance is going to have a therapeutic effect — is ludicrous. 

    And I’ve never seen any independent double blind studies that indicate it works beyond the Placebo effect. If you know of some I would like to hear about it. 

  10. I remember someone commenting on what a great scam a ‘witch’ had on Ebay.  She would cast spells for you, the more she did, the stronger the effect.  So you sent her your money, and she would send you an email later saying that she had cast the spells.  Apparently she had a good rating from her clients, and a really good income from just sending emails to people.

  11. I disagree with the ban. Partly because I think idiots deserve to lose their money but also because maybe, just maybe, some of those who lose their money will see the light and start to recognise bunkum when they come across it.

    Unfortunately that’s not how magical thinking operates.  It only ever counts the hits and ignores the misses.  A behavior on which swindlers prey.

  12. It depends on what eBay’s reasons are for this. If they actually ended up dealing with a lot of disputes for this category, that makes some kind of sense, and is financially motivated rather than about being cowed by pressure from fundies, etc, or even the more paternal kind of skeptic. Can they release some stats on that? Otherwise they’re pulling something of a Romney tax filing.

    I suppose one problem with these kinds of products is that they can contain pretty much anything, potentially something quite harmful even if it’s strictly a food product, like a megadose of vitamin A or similar. In the worst case it could contain toxins (from a plant used in the preparation, for instance) and other kinds of nasties. There’s no way that I can see for eBay to regulate that that wouldn’t incur significant costs (the testing of products for ingestion are where the “nanny state” is generally accepted, except perhaps by those who can afford their own food tasters), particularly if many customers are happy to be poisoned, blaming the effects on the driving out of bad influence or whatever. 

    OTOH, all that’ll happen is that these people will set up their own web stores, but without the accountability of unfiltered reviews. In a way, this is helping the worst con artists as there will be no trustworthy feedback.

  13. “But the ban on magic potions and curses has some users up in arms. One, writing on the eBay forum, even called the ban discriminatory.”

    Yeah!  Do NOT interfere with my god-given right to do stupid things!

  14. So is anyone else thinking about starting a site where people can buy and sell magic shit? Because I am seriously thinking about this. It’s an homage to evolution; though. Prey on the weak and all.  

  15. Now let’s not be too harsh on eBay, they are merely following the Good Lord’s commandment from the Good Book (Exodus 22:18):

    “Thou shalt not suffer a witch to make a living.”

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