Some AMAZING facts about life!

13


Life can be pretty amazing, but what exactly is it at its core?
Life at its simplest is basically a series of chemical reactions that can replicate themselves.

Now all life we have yet come across is tied up with water. Waters a really common, and really polar molecule: theres nothing else really like it. Its strong polar interactions make it an excellent solvent for pretty much anything polar, and also a terrible solvent for non-polar molecules like oil. Life is interesting in that its a subtle interplay of things that are soluble, and not soluble in water. This leads to the changes in the structures of biomolecules that in the end play a key role in life.

Written By: Thunderf00t
continue to source article at

13 COMMENTS

  1. One small error. He said the boiling point of water was 300 degrees Celcius. He meant 100 degrees C, or perhaps 373.15 Kelvin.

    It was a nice review of grade 7 science class, but don’t know if someone unfamiliar with the territory could follow.  I like the way he did things to help you understand relative scale.

    I wish he had inserted a sentence or two that the blue/white spheres were a stylised representation of atoms, not in the least realistic.  He switches representations part way through which I think was needlessly confusing.

    It vaguely reminded me of the writing of Douglas Adams. Perhaps it was just his accent.

  2. He said the boiling point of water was almost 300 degrees Celsius above the boiling point of methane (about  -164 C).  Unfortunately there is a slight pause in the statement, making it a little hard to hear correctly.    

  3. Complexity seems to generally  increase where energy acts upon matter in the universe. From fusion, through chemistry to evolution. Some are simple processes, some we don’t understand, but if hydrogen becomes helium without god why should evolution or the first replicators require supernatural forces?

  4.  
    Nietzsche2
    Life is more than a self replicate system. What about energy and thermodynamic definition of life?

    Replication provides the structure to facilitate other processes.  He said there would be a “Part 2″ of the video explaining more details.

  5.  
    Jerry Bethel + roedygreen
    He said the boiling point of water was almost 300 degrees Celsius above the boiling point of methane (about  -164 C).

    While Jerry is right about the quote, It is possible to have water boiling at 300° c when the pressure is high enough – as at deep-sea “Black Smokers”.  (References in science often assume NTP.)

      http://www.pbs.org/wnet/savage
    The water, now rich with dissolved metals, is heated and then gushes back up through the cracks, forming hydrothermal vents. 
    As the hot water — which can reach temperatures of over 700 degrees Fahrenheit — escapes from the vents and comes in contact with the near-freezing water of the ocean bottom, the metals quickly rain out of their solution.
    The result are surging clouds of particle-rich water called “black smokers,” which often erupt out of tall chimneys of previously deposited solidified mineral.

    Because so much metal is spewed out, hydrothermal vents have been responsible for many of the world’s richest ore deposits, like the copper ores mined on the island of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea.

    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/savage

  6. @OP:disqus  – Now all life we have yet come across is tied up with water. Waters a really common, and really polar molecule: theres nothing else really like it.

    Indeed.  There seem to be some new forms of water recently suggested on high gravity exoplanets! – “Hot Ice”:-

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G
    Its main constituent was initially predicted to be hot “ice” in various exotic high-pressure forms,[9][10] which remains solid because of the planet’s gravity despite the high temperatures.[11] 

Leave a Reply