Italian Nobel laureate Rita Levi-Montalcini dies

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The Italian Nobel prize-winning neurologist Rita Levi-Montalcini has died at the age of 103.


Miss Levi-Montalcini lived through anti-semitic discrimination under fascism to become one of Italy’s top scientists and most respected figures.

She won acclaim for her work on cells, which furthered understanding of a range of conditions, including cancer.

In 1986 she shared the Nobel prize for medicine with biochemist Stanley Cohen for research carried out in the US.

Her niece, Piera Levi-Montalcini, told La Stampa newspaper that she had died peacefully “as if sleeping” after lunch.

Her aunt had continued to carry out several hours of research every day until her death, she said.

Rita Levi-Montalcini was born in 1909 to a wealthy Jewish family in the northern city of Turin, where she studied medicine.

But after she graduated in 1936 the fascist government banned Jews from academic and professional careers, and Miss Levi-Montalcini set up a makeshift laboratory in her bedroom, experimenting on chicken embryos.

Written By: BBC News
continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

7 COMMENTS

  1. Fascism!

    It’s comparable with certain religions in its degree of enlightenment.

    Who, with two brain cells to rub together, would kill off their finest assets?

    Fascists, that’s who.

    Witness the ban on women Priests.

  2. What a fabulous woman! What a singularly valuable human being. Her political life and her engagement in the well being of her own country, after her period of major discovery, should be a pattern for more great minds.

  3. This is so moving. I really admire Rita for her incredible courage throughout her life and her strong ambition for scientific research and love for Science. It’s sad to know that Heroes like her just don’t get the attention they truly deserve. She will be missed and remembered!

  4. In reply to #2 by phil rimmer:

    What a fabulous woman! What a singularly valuable human being. Her political life and her engagement in the well being of her own country, after her period of major discovery, should be a pattern for more great minds.

    My mistake…She never stopped discovering. This paper last year adds new material.

    “At 100, I have a mind that is superior — thanks to experience — than when I was 20.”

    She is why we need to extend useful life. The accumulation of experience in a still healthy mind could bring great insights.

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