Psi and Psychosis: Be Afraid, Be Very Afraid

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There is one thing I feel absolutely secure in saying after spending the last forty-four years of my life conducting parapsychological research; that the paranormal attracts more emotionally disturbed people than any other area of human interest or endeavor.  The chronic encounters with such psychotic people never seems to end.  The question is why?


Men or women, tall or short, thin or fat, rich or poor, educated or ignorant, beautiful or ugly, they appear to be everywhere,  and growing in numbers.  Perhaps many such troubled individuals enter this field with the hope of resolving their own emotional demons?  Perhaps others are seeking the greater truth that underlies our presence and reality?  And yet perhaps others, enter it because it requires absolutely no formal education whatsoever to explore, unlike any other discipline of science?

Where to begin?  Let’s start with the most current and then travel backwards in time to see if there’s any obvious pattern to this blatant madness that all-too-frequently accompanies an obsession with the paranormal or ufology.

Several weeks ago I was introduced to a middle-aged woman related to my research work.  This introduction was a professional one, not a social one, at least that’s what I assumed.

Ellen, was quite striking physically, and easily looked twenty years younger than her chronological age.  In our initial conversations, she seemed to be quite pleasant, but there was a disturbing undercurrent associated with speaking to her.   But as this was supposed to be a business contact, I decided to ignore it.  As you’re about to discover, that was a serious error in judgment on my part.

According to Ellen, much of her young life was tortured by alleged entity attachments, where she was unable to sleep well, if at all, for many years.   As she grew older, her delusional sense of reality was reinforced by friends she made who played into her troubled psyche.  She had major problems keeping boyfriends or friends at all, but was unable to understand why.  I am unaware if these delusional episodes of entity attachment were the result of substance abuse, traumatic brain injury, or growing up in a totally dysfunctional home with its concomitant abuse and neglect.

From there, she developed a sense that aliens were watching and pursuing her.  What a surprise?  When I asked Ellenwhy aliens would want to harass her, her reply was that as she was one of the few people on earth who knew what true love was, and that aliens wanted to learn such from her.  Huh?  What?

Then she supposedly learned how to remote view, but every time someone she knew began thinking about her (even though they weren’t even with her at the time), such an act would cause her to get a severe headache.   In fact, not long after we first spoke on the phone, she asked if I was remote viewing her, as she was getting a terrible headache.

As I didn’t even know her, why would I even want to do such a thing, let alone to her?   But she was sure, that someone, somewhere, must be remote viewing her causing her great mental anguish.  Yeah, right?  By this point, she was starting to give me a headache just by her ridiculous statements.  She also kept asking me if I could sense any entity attachment to her.  I almost said yes, and that it was from her own brain, but that would have been far too cruel for such a demented individual.

She claims to have repeatedly moved over the years, running from both entity attachment and alien capture.  I think what she was really running from here was her own chemically imbalanced brain and her inability to cope with life’s various emotionally difficult moments.

Then she tells me that she’s gone out into certain wilderness areas and actually met Bigfoot, where she had mental conversations with him, via what she calls “mind-speak”.  I almost asked her if Bigfoot told her to see a psychiatrist, but I refrained.  When I asked her what forest she was out in when such occurred, she refused to tell me as it was a secret place.   Yes, I know, the forest is really in that vacuous space between her ears.

Written By: Dr. Barry Taff
continue to source article at barrytaff.net

16 COMMENTS

  1. @OP – There is one thing I feel absolutely secure in saying after spending the last forty-four years of my life conducting parapsychological research;

    What a waste of 40 years!

    – that the paranormal attracts more emotionally disturbed people than any other area of human interest or endeavor.

    I could have told you that with half an hour’s research – but I could be wrong if we take conspiracy theories into account!

    The chronic encounters with such psychotic people never seems to end. The question is why?

    The delusional are attracted to delusional activities!

    • *I see the point that this area would attract crazy and delusional people. Psychic phenomena is rather subjective and difficult to reproduce so although there would be a lot of delusions and over active imaginations it would be difficult to pass everything off as the imagination. It is easy for people to dismiss anything they haven’t experienced out of hand but for people who have experienced spooky experiences that they can’t explain it is not so easy.

  2. I don’t get the point of this piece – the writer met a woman who was mentally ill and she said some crazy things. And then he berates he as though it’s her fault. How about some sympathy?

  3. I gave up reading his stories when it became obvious that he wasn’t ever going to demonstrate awareness of his assholedness.

    However, I did read his urgent message at the end, and it’s interesting. I’m not qualified to speak about the nature of the problem i.e. is it growing, what sorts of fallout to expect etc. But I think developing profitable niche markets aimed at exploiting the deluded, even lending credibility to their delusions to make another buck, is probably inherently risky and has dubious value as entertainment.

  4. I’ll leave the listing of the ethical flaws in this article to those with finer minds and larger hearts. This is a poorly written piece. At best, it’s an example of a poorly reasoned attack on delusion that borders on pseudoscience of the most basic form. In short: how not to write about a mental health issue from a skeptical point of view.

  5. What the…

    I have no words.

    Ripping on people with mental health issues?

    I guess he’s gonna write a piece on cancer patients next, and how their stupid cells multiply out of control when clearly they don’t need to. Wtf losers, that’s not how you do it, what’s wrong with you?!

    Well, I guess when you lack any talent or intelligence to speak of, you have to resort on cheap “shock value” effects to get some poor souls to read you.

  6. The people described by the author do seem to have mental health problems which negatively affect their lives. The descriptions do seem a bit harsh, and I wonder if the author gains any personal benefit from creating this chasm between ‘nutters’ and people with a ‘reasonable belief’ in things which don’t seem to have any evidence to support their existence. Delusions seem, like most mental health issues, to lie on a continuum. Feeling sad is not depression. Similarly heavy drinking is not the same as alcoholism, in that it does not significantly affect ones life in a detrimental fashion (at least in the short term). There seems to be a line that is crossed where pathology arises. Many people claim to have communication with a supernatural entity, the negative effects of which may be limited to causing one to be a sanctimonious prick, or lead one to murder other people. There is a very good reason Dawkins recent book was titled ‘The God DELUSION’, and encouraging delusion seems a bad idea.

  7. Did everyone miss the point?

    People with severe mental health problems go unnoticed because of our culture’s permissiveness for insane ideas. By accepting this degree of ‘diversity’ we are neglecting our fellow humans. Liberal acceptance of woo is resulting in the sick going untreated. Bizarre ideas should be points of suspicion and concern, not protected and revered as sacred territory.

  8. This is unethical behaviour on the author’s part.

    Despite not disclosing the woman’s real name he’s gone way beyond the pale in revealing what should always remain confidential information between a physician and patient.

    Disgraceful!

  9. In reply to #8 by This Is Not A Meme:

    Did everyone miss the point?

    People with severe mental health problems go unnoticed because of our culture’s permissiveness for insane ideas. By accepting this degree of ‘diversity’ we are neglecting our fellow humans. Liberal acceptance of woo is resulting in the sick going untreated. Bizarre ideas should be points of suspicion and concern, not protected and revered as sacred territory.

    On what basis do you claim this? How can you claim a measure of the ‘unnoticed’? Also, are you suggesting that medicating people is treatment? The point that everyone seems to have missed according to you simply demonstrates your own desire to reinstate an inquisition against people with strange ideas. Delusional ideas are only a problem when they begin to affect ones life in a detrimental way. I don’t think delusions should be encouraged from the ground up, but seriously, your post sounds like something from national socialism.

  10. I am troubled by the vicious and demeaning tone of this piece. I grant that his patient’s claims stretch credulity, but to imply that she is psychotic seems to be a stretch. Does she have fantasies? Yes. Is she possibly deluded? Yes, again. But is she psychotic in the classic sense? Is she a danger to herself and others? Just what has she said that is so awful as to lump her in with the worst our society has to offer? She believes aliens are following her because she is one of the few people who know what true is. Okay. A bit weird. But I know many people who absolutely believe that a Jew named Jesus is the son of the creator of the universe and that to believe in him guarantees eternal life. They also believe that their every thought and prayer is heard by this same Jesus. They also believe in angels, demonic beings, something called the holy ghost, virgin birth and so forth. Are they all psychotic? Perhaps they are. Actually, when I think about it, I am more inclined to believe that alien beings from another world are in contact with this woman than I am to believe what most religious people claim. Her claims, though extraordinary, could just possibly be true. Besides, she looks 20 years younger than her chronological age. Can I get some health tips from her?

  11. The article looks like it may have been modified since recent comments here, to better explain the author’s intent.

    I’ve met one person who was psychotically disturbed and was very much a believer in Jesus and everything that goes with it.

    But while that person believed in Jesus, she also was very much aware that she was delusional and insane. She believed that her worst symptoms of insanity were a consequence of the anti-psychotic drugs she was prescribed for many years. So it is possible that even insane people are not always fully insane all the time.
    To some extent ‘conventional’ religious fundamentalism is pretty much exactly that same thing as belief in the CIA or space aliens.

    But conventional religious belief is less challenging. What the guy is saying is that some of this other paranormal nonsense is now going unchallenged, perhaps as a result of the Oprahfication of television broadcasting.

    I suspect that the world is about to experience a mental health epidemic associated with all the other NCD epidemics. There’s no reason why human mental functioning should be exempted when all our other bodily systems are also falling apart. So whether future increasing insanity is manifested in health industry expenditure, more crime and mayhem, more religion, or more Oprah or reality TV (paranormal or merely routinely subnormal as consumer tastes dictate) remains to be seen.

  12. As a sufferer of psychosis i am shocked to my core at this article, i am a strict atheist and so are many of my friends with mental illness.The lack of basic compassion is frightening, psychosis is absolutely terrifying and the hardest part of the illness is finally accepting that you are sick, it’s no wonder the lady in this article is reaching for reasons as to why she has these delusional thoughts,
    i really don’t think articles like this help anybody and are no more than someones cry for attention.

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