Malala Yousafzai, Shot by Pakistani Taliban, Is Discharged From Hospital

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Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head three months ago by the Taliban for advocating the education of girls, has been discharged from a British hospital. Doctors said she had made “excellent progress” and would be staying with her family nearby before returning for further surgery to rebuild her skull in about four weeks.


“Following discussions with Malala and her medical team, we decided that she would benefit from being at home with her parents and two brothers,” said Dr. Dave Rosser, the medical director.

Video released by Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, showed Ms. Yousafzai walking slowly out of a ward, wearing a head scarf and accompanied by a nurse.

The release was a promising turn for the teenage activist. Her shooting brought global condemnation of the Pakistani Taliban, whose fighters killed six female aid workers this week in the same region in northwestern Pakistan where Ms. Yousafzai was shot.

On Oct. 9, gunmen halted her school bus as it went through Mingora, the main town in the Swat Valley, singled her out and opened fire. A bullet grazed her brain, nearly killing her, and traveled through her head before lodging in her neck.

Six days later, after emergency treatment in Pakistan, she was airlifted to the hospital in Birmingham, which specializes in treating British soldiers wounded in action in Afghanistan.

Medical experts say Ms. Yousafzai has a good chance of making a full recovery because of her youth, but the long-term impact of her head injuries remains unclear.

Written By: Declan Walsh
continue to source article at nytimes.com

14 COMMENTS

  1. Brave brave young girl. My heart goes out to you and your family I hope that your sacrifice proves to be for something that lasts and lingers. Something akin to freedom for you and your descendants. You are like Rosa Parks in many ways. It would be great if your triumph over these pieces of excrement ushers in a new era where anyone with a brain can get an education.

  2. In reply to #6 by OHooligan:

    Will the UK grant her asylum? She’s probably got the clearest, strongest case ever.

    Here father has been given a diplomatic post with the Pakistani government in the UK. So she will presumably stay there for the forseeable future.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/world/middleeast/pakistani-girl-shot-by-taliban-will-stay-in-britain.html?ref=asia

    She actually left hospital on the 4th of January.

    Michael

    EDIT: Yes an edit button !

  3. In reply to #8 by paulmcuk:

    I cannot even begin to imagine what it must be like to be 15 years old and know that thousands, if not millions, of people want you – personally – dead.

    She will be consoled by the fact that there will be many more millions who want her to stay alive.

  4. Vorlund, Much as I agree with you, I don’t think Malala will be deconverting any time soon.

    I hope she will inspire Muslims to FIGHT ignorance and misogyny instead of implementing it. If she needs religion to do this, so be it.

    Something about her beautiful, calm demeanor strikes me as one who is more determined than ever.

  5. In reply to #1 by crookedshoes:

    Agreed.

    What Malala Yousafzai has done is bring attention to the single most powerful way we can improve things for everyone and most especially in underdeveloped or socially regressive corners of the world, to whit ensuring women have equal access to education. Starting from there the virtues will cascade down, those of equal access to the democratic process, the protection of the Law and eventually the subverting of the will-crushing paternalism of fundamentalist religion.

    Are there any charities of note that can aid this important task?

  6. In reply to #12 by phil rimmer:

    In reply to #1 by crookedshoes:

    Agreed.

    What Malala Yousafzai has done is bring attention to the single most powerful way we can improve things for everyone and most especially in underdeveloped or socially regressive corners of the world, to whit ensuring women have equal access to education. Starting from there the virtues will cascade down, those of equal access to the democratic process, the protection of the Law and eventually the subverting of the will-crushing paternalism of fundamentalist religion.

    Are there any charities of note that can aid this important task?

    I recommend Plan International’s “Because I am a Girl” campaign, helping families keep girls in education rather than marrying them off or forcing them to work instead. We sponsor a child through Plan (actually a boy in our case) and I highly recommend their work, which is refreshingly free of any religious association unlike so many organizations working in this field.

  7. In reply to #13 by Jonathan Dore:

    I recommend Plan International’s “Because I am a Girl” campaign, helping families keep girls in education rather than marrying them off or forcing them to work instead. We sponsor a child through Plan (actually a boy in our case) and I highly recommend their work, which is refreshingly free of any religious association unlike so many organizations working in this field.

    Many thanks Jonathan. This looks great. I’m passing it on to others I know have been trying to find this kind of carefully targeted charity.

    Because I’m a girl.

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