Antiscience bills in Colorado and Montana fail

8

Two bills encouraging the teaching of alternative ideas in evolution and climate change will not be going forward in Colorado and Montana, though others still exist in Indiana, Oklahoma, Arizona, and Missouri.
House Bill 13-1089 (PDF), which would have encouraged teachers in Colorado to misrepresent the scientific status of evolution and climate change, was rejected by a 7-6 vote in the House Committee on Education on February 4, 2013. The committee also voted 7-6 to postpone further consideration of the bill indefinitely. Otherwise a typical instance of the “academic freedom” strategy for undermining the integrity of science education, HB 13-1089 was unusual in targeting higher education as well as K-12 education. The primary sponsors of HB 13-1089 were Stephen Humphrey (R-District 48) in the House and Scott Renfroe (R-District 13) in the Senate — in Colorado, bills in either house of the legislature will have a sponsor in the other house. Among those testifying for the bill was a representative of the Discovery Institute, who claimed that his organization helped to draft the bill. Among those testifying against the bill were representatives of the Colorado Association of School Boards, the Colorado Education Association, and the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education.

Read more about the Colorado bill

Montana’s House Bill 183, which purports to “encourage critical thinking regarding controversial scientific theories” such as “biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, random mutation, natural selection, DNA, and fossil discoveries,” was tabled in the House Education Committee on February 5, 2013. As NCSE previously reported, the bill was originally intended to “[r]equire public schools to teach intelligent design along with evolution,” which would presumably conflict with the decision in the 2005 case Kitzmiller v. Dover, in which requiring the public schools to teach “intelligent design” was held to be unconstitutional.

Read more about the Montana bill

Written By: NCSE
continue to source article at ncse.com

8 COMMENTS

  1. House Bill 13-1089 (PDF), which would have encouraged teachers in Colorado to misrepresent the scientific status of evolution and climate change, was rejected by a 7-6 vote in the House Committee on Education on February 4, 2013. The committee also voted 7-6 to postpone further consideration of the bill indefinitely.

    It looks like the committee has a “retard index” of 46% .

  2. “Don’t argue with idiots. They’ll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience”.

    Well in that case, they’ll just drain you out. Part of their ‘wedge’ strategy. It seem that these ‘spammers’ have nothing better to do than to drag academics and teachers to these fights.

    Until next time…

  3. The thing that irritates me about all this isn’t just that such lunacy exists, but that there’s no number of “No!” rulings that legally prevent us from having to do it all over again. There really ought to be something analogous to double jeopardy to protect against evolution being put on trial repeatedly until these people get the guilty result they want.

  4. Rick Brattin – R-Mo, ‘traditional values’ baptist, sponsor of HB291. (reportedly/paraphrased), he wants C/ID taught along side evolution because “most people believe in a higher power. It confuses students who believe in god when told they’re from primordial ooze. Both should be taught so students can make up their own minds.”

    The bill is not scheduled for a hearing, and is not on the calendar. I hope this means other Missouri lawmakers recognize BS on a silver platter when they see it.

  5. That the bills were defeated or deferred indefinitely is good news, but the ratio of votes was disturbingly close. Is it possible to say which way the tide is going on this – whether the younger generations in Colorado and Montana and the other states that have similar bills on the table are increasing the number of supporters for pseudoscience in schools or moving away from it? Will support for pseudoscience in schools decline in these states as the baby-boomer generation starts to die off? It is disturbing that this kind of superstition is actually posing a real threat to the educational system of states in the Western world.

Leave a Reply