Blogger murdered in Dhaka

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Ahmed Rajib Haider, 26, was an active participant of the ongoing nonstop demonstrations at Shahbagh demanding death sentences for all ‘war criminals’.

Officer-in-Charge of Pallabi Police Station Abdul Latif Sheikh told bdnews24.com that they recovered Shuvo’s body from Laalmatia’s Palashnagar.

He said a scarf was wrapped around the blogger’s throat.

Another source

Shahbagh blogger killed in Pallabi

A  blogger and online activist, who was active in the Shahbagh movement, was killed in the capital’s Pallabi area Friday night, prompting the Shahbagh protesters to return to their 24-hour demonstration.

Police recovered the body of 30-year-old Ahmed Rajib Haider, full with indiscriminate stab injuries, from near his Kalshi residence in Mirpur.

Aggrieved by the news of the killing of fellow activist, organisers of the Shahbagh movement vowed to continue their movement for 24 hours.

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Continue to source article at The Daily Star

Written By: Zoglul Kamal
continue to source article at bdnews24.com

15 COMMENTS

  1. Its unfortunate that british media like BBC and Economist are supporting this religious fanatic and killers……..the blogger Razib was an atheist….and the killed him just in front of his house…….what BBC and Economist guys will say now? …shame……shame on them…..!

  2. Political murder should always be condemned and this blogger’s death in this way for expressing his opnion is deplorable.

    On the other hand, this guy supported the death penalty, which makes him far more part of the problem than the solution.

    A movement which actively advocates the death penalty is not worthy of support, no matter what their other positions may be.

  3. In reply to #3 by Ramases:

    On the other hand, this guy supported the death penalty, which makes him far more part of the problem than the solution.

    It also makes him fair game. He entered into a struggle, with the aim of killing people. He’s no victim.

  4. @Ramases
    thats the fun part of it………………these Islamic mullahs are killing hundreds and thousands of people in different parts of the country for last 42 years ….and we cannot seek a capital punishment for one of them…ha…ha…ha….life is really a fun….so we will be killed but we would not seek any ones capital punishment……..lots of fun….

  5. oh wow!!!…reading some of the comments here are a mirror to the irony and shameless disgraceful self righteousness of the self proclaimed intelligentsia!!..so,I’m to believe these commenters are against death penalty but justify the brutal murder of a fellow human being saying he’s no victim only because he disagreed with your views??!!..no wonder the world is what it is today and no wonder people still find solace in desert dogmas!!

  6. I don’t know about you guys, but we faced a similar situation in my own country not so long ago. After WW2 the people cried out for justice and 46 war criminals were executed.

    It would seem that brutal mass murder (and rape of minors to boot) is not something a people can just shake off.

    Wiki on Shahbagh Protest

  7. Wow, scary, some of these responses. I agree that promoting the death penalty is not going to solve any problems. What would help is treating all people as equals, including women, poor people rich people, police and bandit. This seems hard but it’s worth your while once you end up at the other side. It takes courage and determination to treat murderers and child molesters as humans. The end result will be less murders and less rapes. Death penalty works counterproductive unless you believe that the safest countries are the ones with capital punishment.

  8. A lot of places in the world that have the death penalty have it because they need it so I’m not going to condemn him for supporting that in Bangladesh – they need it. And just like the UN, the International Court of Justice is viewed as nothing more than a Western invention used to the benefit of the West and nobody else, so I can also understand why they’d rather issue justice their way than send the guilty off to The Hague.

    As for the murder itself, well I can’t even pretend to be surprised.

  9. In reply to #11 by Virgin Mary:

    A lot of places in the world that have the death penalty have it because they need it so I’m not going to condemn him for supporting that in Bangladesh – they need it.

    Why do they need the death penalty? Does it have some proven deterrent effect in Bangladesh that is absent elsewhere?

  10. In reply to #13 by Jabarkis:

    Why do they need the death penalty? Does it have some proven deterrent effect in Bangladesh that is absent elsewhere?

    Because some nations simply aren’t rich enough to waste $5M+ keeping these sacks of **** alive for thirty or forty years. Mob justice is never good, but as a pratical matter, the mob finances the goverment, and if they don’t broadly agree with general sentencing policies, they stop paying taxes, change/overthrow the government, or resort to actual mob justice.

  11. In reply to #14 by ANTIcarrot:

    Because some nations simply aren’t rich enough to waste $5M+ keeping these sacks of alive for thirty or forty years. Mob justice is never good, but as a practical matter, the mob finances the government, and if they don’t broadly agree with general sentencing policies, they stop paying taxes, change/overthrow the government, or resort to actual mob justice.

    I somehow doubt that the cost of keeping someone in prison in a developing country is as high as it would be in a developed country, but, leaving that aside, if the ongoing cost of imprisonment is the primary argument for the death penalty, why not impose it for any crime for which the cost of imprisonment exceeds X dollars?

    If the problem, on the other hand, is public opinion isn’t there a major risk that a death sentence imposed on an innocent would have the same government-toppling effect?

    There are many leaps of logic between adverse public opinion on sentencing (a tiny fraction of government policy) and popular revolt. Isn’t “the mob” rather more likely to grow restive if the government, say, couldn’t ensure the supply of food or water, or if it was thought to be fundamentally corrupt?

    Bangladesh and other developing countries have far more pressing concerns than the death penalty, and that’s just as strong an argument for its abolition as for its continuation – I’d be surprised if more than a tiny minority would express any opinion either way – so why not avoid the moral and procedural minefield of capital punishment entirely?

  12. Yes, but you forgot to mention that these are nations who don’t afford or even care about fair trials either… which gives them yet another reason to kill people. Dead people don’t complain, dead people don’t ask questions or protest! In these countries the media is strictly controlled by the government as well. Hence, I like to ask you who there is left to decide which ones are ” sacks of ****” and which ones are not?

    In reply to #14 by ANTIcarrot:

    In reply to #13 by Jabarkis:

    Why do they need the death penalty? Does it have some proven deterrent effect in Bangladesh that is absent elsewhere?

    Because some nations simply aren’t rich enough to waste $5M+ keeping these sacks of **** alive for thirty or forty years. Mob justice is never good, but as a pratical matter, the mob finances the goverment, and if they don’t broadly agree with general sentencing policies, they stop paying taxes, change/overthrow the government, or resort to actual mob justice.

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