In ‘Fatherless,’ James Dobson Portrays Bleak Future For Families

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Christian conservative leader James Dobson, the founder of the Focus on the Family ministry, has gained a new title: novelist.

Working with co-author Kurt Bruner, a Texas pastor, he’s out with “Fatherless,” the first of a dystopian trilogy that looks into the future when the elderly outnumber the young, advancing the culture wars to new dimensions.

Dobson, 76, answered emailed questions from Religion News Service about his new project.

Some answers have been edited for length and clarity.

Q: Why did you venture into fiction after writing about real-life parenting for so long?

A: This is my first novel, but not my first foray into fiction. I have always believed in the power of narratives to influence thought and shape the spiritual imagination. While with Focus on the Family I challenged the team to create a radio drama series called “Adventures in Odyssey.” My co-author, Kurt Bruner, led that team for several years. We couldn’t be more excited about the potential of this new trilogy to embody themes on which I have been writing, speaking and broadcasting for decades.

Q: With a plot that includes parents of more than two children being dubbed “breeders,” does “Fatherless” depict your worst nightmares?

A: Actually, that term is already being used in some circles today to disparage those who consider children a blessing rather than a burden. As we said in the prologue, a happy home is the highest expression of God’s image on earth. Marriage and parenthood echo heaven, something hell can’t abide. In 1977 I founded what became a worldwide ministry dedicated to the preservation of the home. That effort placed me in one cultural skirmish after another, unwittingly confronting forces much darker than I knew. I don’t pretend to comprehend what occurs in the unseen realm. But I know that we all live in what C.S. Lewis called “enemy-occupied territory.”

Written By: Adelle M. Banks
continue to source article at huffingtonpost.com

19 COMMENTS

  1. The missing subtitles of the trilogy are here provided. Fatherless: a short narrative of Jesus of Nazareth’s bastard life. Childless: the secret story of what Abraham actually did. Godless: a dystopia where I have to find a new cognitive dissonance .

  2. Gee, Jimmy – your portrayal of what constitutes a “happy home” strikes me as bleak and hellish. Your “dystopia”, where women have roles other than “breeder” and men aren’t obligated to support huge families, sounds pretty damn good to me. Your ideal of a patriarchal paradise is only a shrinking wasteland in your bible-addled brain.

  3. Another Christian Taliban view of ‘family’: a patriarch with subservient women, and a multitude of obedient children, and everyone’s happy. Fathers can be nice but so can any loving nurturing adult be, and who said this earth needs more children anyhow? It’s true the in much of the developed world, the elderly are numerous, but this can be, and usually is, offset by immigrants from cultures with high birth rates, and still the world population is exploding.
    Darwin save us from Promise Keepers! The very idea makes my skin crawl.

  4. As we said in the prologue, a happy home is the highest expression of God’s image on earth.

    Funny thing! – My happy home isn’t!

    Marriage and parenthood echo heaven, something hell can’t abide.

    Ah! Hell-mongering for kids! Yeah! Tons of happiness there – in the eyes of those suffering theist-brain-reversal!

    In 1977 I founded what became a worldwide ministry dedicated to the preservation of the home.

    If he wants to pop round, I have a spot of painting needing doing!

    That effort placed me in one cultural skirmish after another, unwittingly confronting forces much darker than I knew.

    Mmmmm! Those delusion-busting forces of reason !

    I don’t pretend to comprehend what occurs in the unseen realm.

    Lying for Jebus again!!

    But I know that we all live in what C.S. Lewis called “enemy-occupied territory.”

    That mean empirical reality. It makes you consider facts and take adult responsibilities, and opposes interfering delusionists.

  5. “A happy home is the highest expression of God’s image on Earth”.

    Talk about presumption of facts not in evidence!!!!!!

    Yeah, Dobsie, I watched ” Leave it to Beaver”, just like your little morons probably did.
    Only I laughed both with it AND AT IT!!!!!!!

  6. I’m surprised at the lack of serious discussion of the key idea in the article: low birth rates are going to change society.

    While it is easy to make fun of the author’s religious motivation, his central theme is one that our rich, western secular society is facing. Birth rates are dropping. Is this going to be a calamity? I don’t think so. Are small families bad for society? Again, I don’t think so.

    People are going to have to put aside money for their retirement and not depend on their children to support them, but given how rich our modern society is this should not be a problem for most people. The same technology that makes us so productive will enable us to support a society that is aging.

    Smaller families do not herald the end of a moral society. Small families allow parents to concentrate their love, care, and resources, and often results in happier children who grow up to be well adjusted, productive adults.

    The birthrate in much of the western world is below replacement levels, and only immigration keeps the population growing in some western states. As the overall world population is still growing this low birthrate will not be an issue for centuries. Still, something that will require serious discussion one day.

  7. Many thanks from the west of Canada, it did take 11 previous posts before the serious subject was address and I guess answered! Thanks for stepping in and letting us know what’s serious, sometimes it’s hard to tell from the west.

    Previous 10 posters, you know who you are!

    In reply to #12 by canadian_right:

    I’m surprised at the lack of serious discussion of the key idea in the article: low birth rates are going to change society.

    While it is easy to make fun of the author’s religious motivation, his central theme is one that our rich, western secular society is facing. Birth rates are dropping. Is this going to be a calamity? I don’t think so. Are small families bad for society? Again, I don’t think so.

    People are going to have to put aside money for their retirement and not depend on their children to support them, but given how rich our modern society is this should not be a problem for most people. The same technology that makes us so productive will enable us to support a society that is aging.

    Smaller families do not herald the end of a moral society. Small families allow parents to concentrate their love, care, and resources, and often results in happier children who grow up to be well adjusted, productive adults.

    The birthrate in much of the western world is below replacement levels, and only immigration keeps the population growing in some western states. As the overall world population is still growing this low birthrate will not be an issue for centuries. Still, something that will require serious discussion one day.

  8. Okay, here’s the real serious issue: Money. Yep, that’s what Dobson is really worried about – the dimming prospects of his ministry to suck it from the pockets of the ignorant and gullible. The church-going, tithing population is aging, and as they die and are not replaced by faithfully-tithing young people, the grotesquely overblown incomes of pastors, ministers, and other religious scam artists like Dobson will plummet. To top it all off, the less money these scammers have, the less influence they have in politics, and the less likely they are to maintain their cushy tax-free, unregulated privileges. Money and power are real movers and shakers. Religion is just a handy tool for creative psychopaths and con artists.

    Cynical? You bet – but that doesn’t mean it ain’t the real bottom line.

    • In reply to #14 by Sue Blue:

      Okay, here’s the real serious issue: Money. Yep, that’s what Dobson is really worried about – the dimming prospects of his ministry to suck it from the pockets of the ignorant and gullible. The church-going, tithing population is aging, and as they die and are not replaced by faithfully-tithing y……… The ignorant and gullible should be separated from their money. Send it to me. I’m certain I can make better use out of it than DaDaDa Dobson. In 2007 he made $138,000,000 off these stupid and/or misguided sheep. That’s the latest figures I’ve heard.

  9. In the UK, at any rate, those who go on about the importance of the family unit, and how fatherless kids are likely to become various kinds of undesirable, tend to be the same people (journalists, politicians etc) who gush about how we all pulled together in World War II and how noble we were then, as a nation. I’m not saying our fight was not noble, but…

    That war meant that I (born in 1934) had no father around during my formative childhood years, and of course many fathers never returned. I may not be up to much myself, but surely most of my generation didn’t turn out so very badly? You never hear a mention of all this from the family-boosters, because we mustn’t detract from the nostalgia for our glorious days when we stood against the Hun.

  10. Novelist? No way, no how. He’s gods version of Joseph Goebbels. The trash he writes is nothing more than, well, trash. Anyone that thinks he’ anything more than a propagandist should watch an excellent and very moving documentary called- FOR THE BIBLE TELL ME SO. It’s about gays and religion, but it definitely hit’s ole Dobson up side his head.

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