Malala Yousafzai fund ‘to boost education’

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Shot Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai has described how a fund has been set up in her name to help all children get an education.

Malala, 15, was speaking in an interview recorded before surgery at a Birmingham hospital on Saturday.

She was shot on a school bus in October in Pakistan by the Taliban after campaigning for girls’ rights.

Surgeons at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital said Malala was recovering “very well” from the latest operation.

A bullet was removed from her head by surgeons in Pakistan, before she was flown to the UK for further treatment.

Malala was discharged as an inpatient from Queen Elizabeth Hospital in January and underwent a five-hour operation at the weekend to fit a titanium plate over her damaged skull.

She also had a cochlear implant fitted to deal with some deafness caused by her injuries.

Speaking in the video in English, Malala said she wanted to “serve the people”.

Written By: BBC News
continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

24 COMMENTS

  1. Is this god that Malala thanked the same god that the Taliban no doubt thanked when they shot her in the head? (Rant over.)

    I think Malala is a great example to girls and boys around the world (her beliefs notwithstanding). Articulate, thoughtful, old beyond her years. If only there were more young people like her.

    Get well soon, Malala (and don’t forget to thank the scientists, engineers, doctors, paramedics and nurses who helped you)!

  2. I feel slightly sickened that the recovery is attributed to prayers. Why not stay in Pakistan if this was the important factor? I don’t like the way this girl is being lauded, when the majority in Pakistan don’t appear to support progress. This is an awful incident that will be repeated. I used to live in a largely Pakistani area of Nottingham. I remember that my neighbour never responded to my greetings in 4 years, and scowled at me if I said hello to his wife over the garden wall. Still, at least the Indians have someone to look down on.

  3. I feel very strongly that we should stand alongside Malala against the barbarism of the Taliban. I have heard other comments from her father who has profusely thanked the doctors and other supporters for their help. In this rather short clip that the BBC have selected, they have shown the bits about god.

    I personally would be very impressed if one day Malala makes a new public statement – maybe this will happen in a few years’ time – where she is standing alongside Maryam Namazi and explaining why she is no longer a Muslim. In the meantime, I think it’s good for us to come across as friendly and supportive and reasonable and above all NOT RACIST while waiting for this to happen to our Muslim friends.

  4. In reply to #4 by Capt. Bloodeye:

    I feel slightly sickened that the recovery is attributed to prayers.

    I don’t freaking care about that. I don’t mind it, all things considered. It’s her way expressing gratitude to all of us who wished her well. And she is recovering. thank science.

    I hope she continues to recover, and gets the education she fought so hard for.

  5. In reply to #1 by RDfan:

    Is this god that Malala thanked the same god that the Taliban no doubt thanked when they shot her in the head? (Rant over.)

    I think Malala is a great example to girls and boys around the world (her beliefs notwithstanding). Articulate, thoughtful, old beyond her years. If only there were more young people like her.

    Get well soon, Malala (and don’t forget to thank the scientists, engineers, doctors, paramedics and nurses who helped you)!

    She’s a great example, her beliefs notwithstanding? What on Earth does that mean? Malala’s beliefs are part of what makes her the person she is. They’re integral to her character. Take them away, in other words, travel back in time and somehow persuade her parents to raise her as an atheist, and what you’d have today is someone completely different.

    Malala’s faith in God is evidently very strong; it’s possible it aided in her recovery. Would she have taken the stand which resulted in her attempted assassination without the conviction that God was on her side?

    In reply to #4 by Capt. Bloodeye:

    I don’t like the way this girl is being lauded, when the majority in Pakistan don’t appear to support progress.

    I don’t get this. You seem to be saying that we shouldn’t laud people who fight against social injustice if they themselves are from that society. Should all attempts at societal change only be supported if they’re being made by outside agents?

  6. In reply to #7 by Katy Cordeth:

    She’s a great example, her beliefs notwithstanding? What on Earth does that mean? Malala’s beliefs are part of what makes her the person she is. They’re integral to her character. Take them away, in other words, travel back in time and somehow persuade her parents to raise her as an atheist, and what you’d have today is someone completely different.

    Malala’s faith in God is evidently very strong; it’s possible it aided in her recovery. Would she have taken the stand which resulted in her attempted assassination without the conviction that God was on her side?

    Clearly what I meant by her beliefs is her belief in a deity. This has been an “integral” part of her character, but it is not essential, not indelible and not something I wish others her age to emulate. Judging from her interviews and blogs on the BBC and so on, she is clearly very knowledgeable. So it’s not unreasonable to hope she sees through the patent falseness of god-belief.

    I too believed in such woo when I was around about her age, but I don’t anymore. I am, for all intents and purposes, the “same” person I was then (given that my world view has changed and the cells that were “me” at that age are probably all changed by now). So people can change their views with respect to religious belief and yet still argue for and against certain causes.

    Whether or not she would have taken such a stand without her belief in god is an interesting, though hard to test, hypothesis. But it’s not unheard of for non-believers to take a principled stance.

    Did her beliefs aid her recovery? Maybe; maybe not; that’s yet another interesting “What if…?”.

  7. In reply to #7 by Katy Cordeth:

    In reply to #1 by RDfan:

    Is this god that Malala thanked the same god that the Taliban no doubt thanked when they shot her in the head? (Rant over.)

    I think Malala is a great example to girls and boys around the world (her beliefs notwithstanding). Articulate, thoughtful, old beyond her years. If only there were more young people like her.

    Get well soon, Malala (and don’t forget to thank the scientists, engineers, doctors, paramedics and nurses who helped you)!

    She’s a great example, her beliefs notwithstanding? What on Earth does that mean? Malala’s beliefs are part of what makes her the person she is. They’re integral to her character. Take them away, in other words, travel back in time and somehow persuade her parents to raise her as an atheist, and what you’d have today is someone completely different.

    Malala’s faith in God is evidently very strong; it’s possible it aided in her recovery. Would she have taken the stand which resulted in her attempted assassination without the conviction that God was on her side?

    In reply to #4 by Capt. Bloodeye:

    I don’t like the way this girl is being lauded, when the majority in Pakistan don’t appear to support progress.

    I don’t get this. You seem to be saying that we shouldn’t laud people who fight against social injustice if they themselves are from that society. Should all attempts at societal change only be supported if they’re being made by outside agents?

    It left a bad taste in my mouth when I heard her saying that prayer to her savage god had made her well (rather than medical science and the dedication of human doctors) – but at the same time, it is to be expected, given her upbringing and culture – and I’m sure she has thanked the doctors and nurses in private.

    As Katy infers, it wouldn’t matter if she believed in the Jelly Monster from the planet Zarg, the important thing is that she is alive and well and is still willing to try to make a difference in her country of birth.

    The comment about giving Indians someone to look down on is a little foolish too, considering their problems with violent gang rape that have been recently in the news.

  8. After thanking everyone’s prayers for her recovery I am beginning to wonder what kind of education she has in mind. However that is her world view the one in which she has been brought up. If she manages to satisfy her thirst for knowledge at some point in her life she may re-evaluate her position on religious belief.

    I wish her well, she is great example of the indomitability of the human ‘spirit’.

  9. I feel nothing but deep admiration for this girl, her doctors and the nursing staff. It’s a wonderful example of how science can work for the betterment of the human condition. Civilisation and compassion trump barbarism and hate!

  10. In reply to #4 by Capt. Bloodeye:

    I feel slightly sickened that the recovery is attributed to prayers. Why not stay in Pakistan if this was the important factor? I don’t like the way this girl is being lauded, when the majority in Pakistan don’t appear to support progress. This is an awful incident that will be repeated. I used to live in a largely Pakistani area of Nottingham. I remember that my neighbour never responded to my greetings in 4 years, and scowled at me if I said hello to his wife over the garden wall. Still, at least the Indians have someone to look down on.

    Sorry, your take is mean-spirited; she is very young and has been subjected to the indoctrination of Islam. Give her time to mature whilst absorbing the influences of a different culture. Criticising her for being ‘lauded’, which she has no control over is ‘on the nose’. She’s a hell of a lot braver than me (and likely you, too)- that much is certain.

  11. In reply to #13 by Virgin Mary:

    I’d love to know who is behind her and who’s interests she is now serving.

    What the hell? Are you suggesting some conspiracy theory, or will you explain in more detail?

  12. First time since the launch of the new website that I’ve needed to quote….. how the hell do you do it?

    In response to comment 13:

    I’m not suggesting any conspiracy theory, I’m suggesting that a 15 year old Pakistani girl who has suddenly been thrust into the global media spotlight is the stuff of dreams for the cronies in power of one of the most corrupt and contemptible countries on the face of the planet. Anybody who thinks that anything less than 100% of the words that come out of her mouth are not scripted is simply naive.

  13. So sad she said that ‘god had given her another chance’. (BBC News) The same God I imagine that ‘allowed’ the Taliban to shoot her in the first place? Lets hope one day she will be able to carry her logic a step further and her ambition to further her education will liberate her from the very thing which constrains her. Anyway, a brave young woman and an icon for oppressed young women everywhere.

  14. In reply to #4 by Capt. Bloodeye:

    I feel slightly sickened that the recovery is attributed to prayers. Why not stay in Pakistan if this was the important factor? I don’t like the way this girl is being lauded, when the majority in Pakistan don’t appear to support progress. This is an awful incident that will be repeated.

    What on Earth do you mean why not stay in Pakistan. This girl is being lauded because she is a stood up to bullies trying to deny her and other girls an education! Her blog had been going for ages yet nothing about her and her bravery was mentioned on this site until she was shot! Why not?

    If you want to end the worse excesses of religion the education of girls in countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan is key. And you don’t encourage them to be educated by telling them first and foremost to ditch their beliefs and cultures, you educate them to a point where they choose to ditch those beliefs and cultures becuase they no longer see them as relevant. That, after all, is why the Taliban shot her, brave intelligent girls don’t choose to live in cultures where they are the chattels of the sorts of sad inadequate males that join the Taliban.

    I also think we ought to be questioning why muslim girls are the brave ones standing up for education when in our own secular country the aspirations of girls are far lower? A friend volunteers for Women into Science and Engineering which is trying to address future shortfalls in numbers of engineers by trying to encourage more women into STEM subjects. She held a day for girls from local schools who were considering physics/maths A levels. What did she, an atheist, find? Apart from the obvious large number from a selective girls grammar school, the bulk were either from the two local faith schools or if from the non faith schools a disproportionate ammount were clearly muslim. Teacher friends often despair at the lowering aspirations of so many of the girls they teach after a long period when things improved, and also comment on the disproportionate numbers of mildly religious ones that are ambitious.

    So what exactly is going wrong. In backward Pakistan we have a girl from one of the most awful religions fighting for the rights of girls to be doctors, lawyers, politicians and engineers whilst in the UK we have non religious girls wanting to be WAGs and Jordon? A muslim girl seems to have done more to raise the profile of girls education in Pakistan than this website. That shouldn’t be the case. This foundation is made up of three men and one woman, guess who is in charge of organising childcare? That shouldn’t be the case either.

    Athests really should be the ones doing what Malala had to do – Gender equality should be a basic part of our remit shouldn’t it? Yet often it seems not to be.

  15. In reply to #19 by atheistengineer:

    What on Earth do you mean why not stay in Pakistan. This girl is being lauded because she is a stood up to bullies trying to deny her and other girls an education! Her blog had been going for ages yet nothing about her and her bravery was mentioned on this site until she was shot! Why not?

    What is wrong with the question “Why not stay were you are?” That is a valid question. I suggest we need to ask these questions to anyone who seeks asylum to any nation.

    If you want to end the worse excesses of religion the education of girls in countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan is key. And you don’t encourage them to be educated by telling them first and foremost to ditch their beliefs and cultures, you educate them to a point where they choose to ditch those beliefs and cultures becuase they no longer see them as relevant.

    What is the point of education if you can’t teach the truth? Are you saying, we need to leave issues that we know for sure causes human suffering? If superstition, religion, (3rd world)culture and traditions are known to be counter-productive to increasing the well-being, should we not oppose/mock/ridicule them and teach them to do the same?

    I also think we ought to be questioning why muslim girls are the brave ones standing up for education when in our own secular country the aspirations of girls are far lower? A friend volunteers for Women into Science and Engineering which is trying to address future shortfalls in numbers of engineers by trying to encourage more women into STEM subjects. She held a day for girls from local schools who were considering physics/maths A levels. What did she, an atheist, find? Apart from the obvious large number from a selective girls grammar school, the bulk were either from the two local faith schools or if from the non faith schools a disproportionate ammount were clearly muslim. Teacher friends often despair at the lowering aspirations of so many of the girls they teach after a long period when things improved, and also comment on the disproportionate numbers of mildly religious ones that are ambitious.

    Other than anecdotal experience, do you have any evidence to support that claim? Here are few sources that seem to contradict your observation,

    http://goo.gl/yg8el

    http://goo.gl/a4UKs

    Excerpt from the article, “The analysis confirms some facts on ethnic attainment gaps and yields a number of striking findings. We confirm that in the high stakes exams taken at age 16, pupils from some ethnic groups achieve considerably lower scores than white pupils on average: pupils with Black Caribbean heritage, other Black heritage or Pakistani ethnicity. Students with Indian or Chinese ethnicity score much higher than their white peers.”

    Those god-less commies and polytheistic heathens!

    So what exactly is going wrong. In backward Pakistan we have a girl from one of the most awful religions fighting for the rights of girls to be doctors, lawyers, politicians and engineers whilst in the UK we have non religious girls wanting to be WAGs and Jordon?

    As Marx would have exclaimed, Class antagonism. Made worse by the celebrity worship inherited via a reverence to monarchy? Look around in Europe like in Scandinavia, US & Central Europe. The gender divide isn’t that bad.A very intelligent, academic who is also a powerful politician – Angela Merkel?

    Athests really should be the ones doing what Malala had to do – Gender equality should be a basic part of our remit shouldn’t it? Yet often it seems not to be.

    And they are doing exactly that! Combating religion head on, and not pussy-footing around bronze-age superstitions :)

  16. R.E. Katy Cordeth

    ‘Would she have taken the stand which resulted in her attempted assassination without the conviction that God was on her side?’.

    Would her potential murders have did what they did without the equal conviction that god was on THEIR side? The idea that all children regardless of gender have the right to be educated does not in any way depend on the idea that there is a god that says this should be so. It is obvious to anymore who believes that all humans are equal. Although other things can cause people to deviate from this, the idea that god has made females as the inferior sex to be used by males like domestic slaves and chattel and that all threats to male domination is to met by murderous violence has to be counted as one of the biggest insults to humanity currently on this planet. It can be left to the godly, not atheists, to shoot little girls in the head (or throw acid into their faces) for the ‘crime’ of going to school.

    As she is still a child we can all admire Malala for her courage whilst the same time hoping that one day she will outgrow apologising for the very reason she was shot in the first place.

  17. In reply to #17 by Virgin Mary:

    First time since the launch of the new website that I’ve needed to quote….. how the hell do you do it?

    Just click on “Reply” at the bottom right of the comment you wish to quote. This will paste the text and link will be pasted to the comment box. You can edit it from there.

    Hint: Make sure there is a blank line between the quoted text and your comments so that the system doesn’t mix them together.

  18. In reply to #21 by paul1983:

    R.E. Katy Cordeth

    ‘Would she have taken the stand which resulted in her attempted assassination without the conviction that God was on her side?’.

    Would her potential murders have did what they did without the equal conviction that god was on THEIR side? The idea that all children regardless of gender have the right to be educated does not in any way depend on the idea that there is a god that says this should be so. It is obvious to anymore who believes that all humans are equal. Although other things can cause people to deviate from this, the idea that god has made females as the inferior sex to be used by males like domestic slaves and chattel and that all threats to male domination is to met by murderous violence has to be counted as one of the biggest insults to humanity currently on this planet. It can be left to the godly, not atheists, to shoot little girls in the head (or throw acid into their faces) for the ‘crime’ of going to school.

    As she is still a child we can all admire Malala for her courage whilst the same time hoping that one day she will outgrow apologising for the very reason she was shot in the first place.

    Very true, but let’s remember that she is still a child – a child who has spent her first 15 years on this planet being brainwashed, mostly by her parents, into believing myths and fantasies that originated in the Bronze Age…

    The fact that she says the things she does about equality already (the very same things that got her shot in the first place) are a great sign that eventually, as she grows into an adult, she will discard the other disgusting religious baggage that currently smothers her.

    So I think she will, given time, outgrow her filth (sorry, faith) and become even more of an example to her people than she is now.

    There is one thing I wish for even more than that – that she is not the only one…

  19. Isn’t it amazing – millions of dead innocent angered Iraqis, Afganis and American solders later, Taliban is still there…Sorry, but there is something wrong there!…..

    May be Malala should start sucking up to Taliban as well in order to stop them from harming and killing her… It’s a brilliant strategy!

    Many people living on the territory of the US keep forgetting that Pilgrims called America America before the emergence of all those modern day US population with all their bullshit in here….Let’s just call them…redundant.

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