Gripping Science Tales Need Not Be Science Fiction

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From KHUF – Houston Public Radio – Ira Flatow interviews the authors in Phoenix

When does a story about science become science fiction? Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss and theoretical physicist Brian Greene discuss how to spin a yarn about string theory or the Big Bang, without hyping the science. And novelist Ian McEwan, whose books touch on neurosurgery and quantum field theory, talks about what science offers to fiction.


Continue to source article below for the audio interview with host Ira Flatow

Written By: Ira Flatow – Brian Greene, Lawrence Krauss, Ian McEwan
continue to source article at app1.kuhf.org

3 COMMENTS

  1. There has always been comic-book rubbish pseudo-science science fantasy which ignore known science.

    The best SF has been written by imaginative scientists – H.G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Douglas Adams ….. . ..

    • In reply to #1 by Alan4discussion:

      There has always been comic-book rubbish pseudo-science science fantasy which ignore known science.

      The best SF has been written by imaginative scientists – H.G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Douglas Adams ….. . ..

      Now, not that I don’t like Clarke, but I wonder how is writing about non-corporeal Grand Galactic Overlords that can jump from any point to any point in zero time not “ignoring known science”(for the sake of the plot being fun, of course, not because Clarke isn’t scientifically trained, but still) :)

      • In reply to #2 by JoxerTheMighty:

        In reply to #1 by Alan4discussion:

        There has always been comic-book rubbish pseudo-science science fantasy which ignore known science.

        The best SF has been written by imaginative scientists – H.G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Douglas Adams ….. . ..

        Now, not that I don’t like Clarke, but I wonder how is writing about non-corporeal Grand Galactic Overlords that can jump from any point to any point in zero time not “ignoring known science”(for the sake of the plot being fun, of course, not because Clarke isn’t scientifically trained, but still) :)

        SF is about adding speculation and future projection to the understanding of the science at the time. With hindsight much of it is proved to be wrong or fantasy, but the good authors try for some scientific credibility but speculating on unknowns is never going to be reliable.

        Clarke predicted geosynchronous orbits and was involved with BIS producing a very credible Luna landing module decades before NASA, but his first story “The Sands of Mars” was way off by today’s knowledge. Like “StarTrek” and “The Hitch-Hikers Guide” there are fictitious technologies and forces, to add interest, functionality and depth to the stories.

        I think the point I was making, was that some of these authors were writing science reference books and articles, as well as fiction, showing that they had a clear view of the separation of Sci-fact, Sci-fiction and sci-speculation.

        Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born American author of highly successful Science Fiction and Mystery novels and short stories, as well as popular science books.

        The list of his work in science and science fiction is massive! (see link)

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