Number Of Early Childhood Vaccines Not Linked To Autism

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A large new government study should reassure parents who are afraid that kids are getting autism because they receive too many vaccines too early in life.


The study, by researchers at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, found no connection between the number of vaccines a child received and his or her risk of autism spectrum disorder. It also found that even though kids are getting more vaccines these days, those vaccines contain many fewer of the substances that provoke an immune response.

The study offers a response to vaccine skeptics who have suggested that getting too many vaccines on one day or in the first two years of life may lead to autism, says Frank DeStefano, director of the Immunization Safety Office of the CDC.

To find out if that was happening, DeStefano led a team that compared the vaccine histories of about 250 children who had autism spectrum disorder with those of 750 typical kids. Specifically, the researchers looked at what scientists call antigens. An antigen is a substance in a vaccine that causes the body to produce antibodies, proteins that help fight off infections.

The team looked at medical records to see how many antigens each child received and whether that affected the risk of autism. The results, published in The Journal of Pediatrics, were unequivocal.

Written By: Jon Hamilton
continue to source article at npr.org

6 COMMENTS

  1. Believing anything the FDA says is irrational. The CDCs rep is still intact and I hope this does some good.

    The completely broken state of the FDA gave anti-vaxers a lot of mileage, particularly on the issue of injecting babies with mercury.

  2. ” A large new government study should reassure parents who are afraid that kids are getting autism because they receive too many vaccines too early in life. “

    Doubtful. Some say, ” If we just show them enough evidence, sharpen our arguments, sweeten our persuasions and be persistent we can convince these people of the validity of our positions. ” Doesn’t work with creationists and it doesn’t work with believers in woo either.

    A more basic change, a self-motivated change, must take place first in people before they apply critical thinking instead of feelings in matters such as this.

  3. Optimistic. Not whilst the likes of homeopaths still have such an agenda to sell their wares for ridiculous amounts. I always find it amazing that the anti-vaccine/medicine brigade harp on about pharma companies protecting their profits without realising that’s exactly what their own champions are doing!

  4. While antivax campaigners with no medical qualifications can publish books encouraging children to catch measles rather than get vaccinations, and get it sold on Amazon, there is no cause for optimism. Indeed, the money that can be made by being a conspiracy theorist is quite sizeable, when there are so many people willing to mistrust science or anything backed by the government.

  5. I don’t know why money was wasted on this study. First, didn’t the guy who started all this confess to being a fraud? Second, anti-vaxxers won’t believe a government study, or any study that doesn’t agree with their delusions.

    • In reply to #5 by A3Kr0n:

      First, didn’t the guy who started all this confess to being a fraud?

      Yeah, well obviously the govt and big pharma threatened his family. Or replaced him with a clone. Or used mind-control lasers on him. Something.

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