Rising atheism among Genocide survivors

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His loving grandparents – who were proud to spent most of their lives within the walls of Kibeho Parish – were burned alive while they knelt in front of the altar hailing the Virgin Mary, but this time for their survival.

“I renounced Christianity to become atheist when, after the Genocide, I learned about what happened to them,” says Jacques Musoni, 32, a married man living in Nyamirambo. “I couldn’t possibly bear in mind how priests unleashed killers to exterminate their flocks. It was unimaginably incomprehensible. But also, I was wondering where that so-called omnipresent, omnipotent God was.”

For him, there was no way he could keep on praying for a God who seemed to be dead. He said God has never done anything for him. He always asked himself why that God chose to let people be killed in front of him like that. If it’s his decision, he argues, then that’s how he must be defined.

“He doesn’t exist. I decided to not waste time any longer. And if he exists, I don’t see any difference between him and genocidaires,” he says sternly. “He’s a God who ruthlessly murdered innocent babies, a God who proudly committed terrible massacres in the history of mankind.” 

It’s possible that you might have merely read Exodus 12:29-30 without having had a second thought of what happened in Egypt at that time. If you close your eyes and visualize the catastrophic events, then you’ll understand what Musoni meant by equating God to the genocidaires.

Here’s the verse: At midnight the LORD smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh that sat on his throne unto the firstborn of the captive that was in the dungeon; and all the firstborn of cattle…and there was a great cry in Egypt; for there was not a house where there was not one dead

To understand the verse well, this is what really happened: There was a funeral in every home in Egypt. Women were crying and every family was forced to bury its own dead because friends were also burying their innocent little ones. If you don’t understand it yet, think of what this tragedy would do if that large scale infanticide was committed in Rwanda – starting from your own family.  

Written By: Irene Nayebare
continue to source article at allafrica.com

14 COMMENTS

    • “I renounced Christianity to become atheist when, after the Genocide, I learned about what happened to them,” says Jacques Musoni, 32, a married man living in Nyamirambo. “I couldn’t possibly bear in mind how priests unleashed killers to exterminate their flocks.

      This is, I think, a major factor contributing to the growth of atheism, or at the very least the decline of organised religion. The sheer violence and cruelty that some individuals and institutions commit or promote in the name of their religion. We merely have to offer a humane and rational alternative, and the fanatics drive the others right towards it.

  1. I don’t know if I posted that correctly. I’m not good with computers. I signed up for an account on this site just to respond. But I wanted to post this quote from the article:
    “You do not need religion to know what is wrong and what is right,” says Ndahiro. “In fact, what religious people do practice is not morality. I consider a moral action as that which is free from promises like a heaven or fear of hell.”
    I think that needs to be a meme.

    • The link worked. Thank you MonkeyHead.

      “You do not need religion to know what is wrong and what is right,” says Ndahiro. “In fact, what religious people do practice is not morality. I consider a moral action as that which is free from promises like a heaven or fear of hell.”

      I think that needs to be a meme.

      I agree. It’s worth repeating.

  2. I know several fellow members of the Armed Forces who were sent into Rwanda in the immediate aftermath of the genocide and the stories they related were truely horrifying! Religion at its most disgusting.
    I really do hope as Sjoerd suggests that these kind of outrages do continue to help people sling religion in the dustbin of history were it belongs.

  3. Over the centuries many different tragedies, atrocities and general catastrophe have taken place through war, famines, natural disasters, etc. It would not have been uncommon say 200 years ago for a group of people to justify an accidental tragedy or a natural disaster as an act of some deity or devil and cling to that idea despite any evidence to the contrary. Tragedy is a very potent circumstance and religion has been quite notorious for attempting to weasel its half-hearted justifications to rally people around its tenets.

    And while it is something that is still practiced today, I am encouraged to read articles like this as well as saddened by the circumstances. We have more and more access to information about ourselves and the world, and in tragedy we appear to have more people looking less to some mysterious supernatural force for comfort and more to each other in consolation.

    I’m very much moved.

  4. The author is so right. Of course it comes down to the problem of evil in the world. The so-called loving God doesn’t give a shit and that’s that !

    All that shite about freewill is so much meaningless babble.

    God sits there, does nothing whilst humans murder other humans. What better “proof” of the non existence of a loving God?

  5. Look at what’s happening in the world, and look at what has happened in the world. If a creator god really is responsible for all of that, then that makes every reverent worshipper either atrociously ignorant or morally repugnant.

    • In reply to #13 by Pauly01:

      How is there a Jewish faith? These people are obviously positive. Given there near extermination would not have taken place if one man had got a premature heart attack.

      They’d probably offer their own survival as reason to believe. Which… well, we all know that’s not going to fly with us.

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