Sears repents for advertising on violent ‘Jesus’ skit

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Two major retailers have apologized or removed their ads after receiving complaints about a “Saturday Night Live” skit about “Jesus” returning from the dead as a vengeful murderer, says a traditional-values group.

“We applaud Sears and JCPenney for their wise action to stop funding damaging material such as the skit that mocked our Lord Jesus Christ on ‘Saturday Night Live,’” Tim Wildmon, president of the American Family Association (AFA) said Tuesday.

“I can tell you that as long as corporations support this kind of offensive material, their sales are going to suffer as shoppers abandon retailers that support blasphemy,” he said.

“I hope folks can reinstate their patronage to these stores, and that Sears and JCPenney can stick with the good decisions they have now made,” he added.

In an email from a corporate spokeswoman, Sears thanked the AFA for bringing the Feb. 16 skit to its attention. “We’re taking steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again,” the email said, according to Mr. Wildmon.

JCPenney removed its ads from the NBC-TV online site for its popular late-night comedy show, and it did not advertise on a recent show, the Tupelo, Miss.-based AFA said.

For decades, “SNL” has poked fun at sacred subjects, but it crossed the line for countless Christians with its Feb. 16 skit — a trailer for a fake movie called, “Djesus Uncrossed,” a gory spoof of a Quentin Tarantino film, “Django Unchained.”

Written By: Cheryl Wetzstein
continue to source article at washingtontimes.com

18 COMMENTS

  1. their sales are going to suffer as shoppers abandon retailers…JCP removed ads

    JCP’s new CEO is for certain gonna get flamed now. Shoppers have already abandoned thanks to a disastrous
    hip/modern makeover of stores. Also, they are currently embroiled in a 3-way legal battle with Macy’s and Martha Stewart. Of course they pulled ads, it is called CYA.

    applaud Sears and JCP…hope they stick with good decisions they’ve made.

    Ah yes, whilst AFA sticks them with red hot cattle prods, you mean. >(

  2. I recall another spoof movie trailer from the ’90s – Ghandi II.

    It had the little bald bespectacled Indian dude wrapped in a sheet swinging a baseball bat smashing car windshields as he strode towards the camera – “And this time there’s none of that non-violence crap” in the voiceover. Highly entertaining. Now, just waiting for the Djesus to finish buffering, so I can see if it’s as funny….

  3. Sounds brilliant. Where can I see it? If I shopped with them I’d stop. My protest at their spinelessness is therefore limited to tutting loudly and shaking my head. That’ll teach them.

  4. Here’s the link to the SNL skit:
    [DJesus Uncrossed] (http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/new-tarantino-movie/n32896)

    Christians need to get used to the idea that that religion is fair game for criticism and humor just like any other point of view.

    “If someone tells me that I’ve hurt their feelings, I say, ‘I’m still waiting to hear what your point is. In this country, I’ve been told ‘That’s offensive’ as if those two words constitute an argument or a comment.
    Not to me they don’t.”

    • Christopher Hitchens
  5. There will be strong disagreement with me for saying this, but those companies are in business to sell goods and services to as many customers as possible, not to stand up for issues. Doing things that will alienate customers and potential customers is bad business and a disservice to their stockholders. What they did in withdrawing sponsorship was a business decision; they knew they would alienate fewer customers (the likes of us) by withdrawing than they would by continuing their sponsorship. BLUEBIRD (comment 2) says that it is called CYA. Indeed it is, and much as I don’t like it, I can’t condemn them for it.

    • In reply to #10 by 78rpm:

      There will be strong disagreement with me for saying this, but those companies are in business to sell goods and services to as many customers as possible, not to stand up for issues. Doing things that will alienate customers and potential customers is bad business and a disservice to their stockholders. What they did in withdrawing sponsorship was a business decision; they knew they would alienate fewer customers (the likes of us) by withdrawing than they would by continuing their sponsorship. BLUEBIRD (comment 2) says that it is called CYA. Indeed it is, and much as I don’t like it, I can’t condemn them for it.

      I take the view Hitchens does: the fact that the decision has to be made at all isn’t because they respect the religious views, but because the religious will come down like a ton of bricks on them if they don’t.

      As much as I agree that this is a pragmatic decision under the circumstances, and therefore that the businesses shouldn’t be judged harshly for it, I still think there should be people who protest about the circumstances in the first place. The whole point of advertising is that people can take it or – if it’s not of interest to them – leave it. Demanding that adverts be rescinded because they blaspheme is yet another example of thin-skinned religious people making a big fuss about “offence”.

    • In reply to #10 by 78rpm:

      There will be strong disagreement with me for saying this, but those companies are in business to sell goods and services to as many customers as possible, not to stand up for issues. Doing things that will alienate customers and potential customers is bad business and a disservice to their stockholders. What they did in withdrawing sponsorship was a business decision; they knew they would alienate fewer customers (the likes of us) by withdrawing than they would by continuing their sponsorship. BLUEBIRD (comment 2) says that it is called CYA. Indeed it is, and much as I don’t like it, I can’t condemn them for it.

      I don’t think that it’s a very good business decision. SNL is aimed at the younger, more secular, audience so such advertising is probably aimed at grabbing those younger customers. How effective the advertising is I don’t know but it is certainly arguable that losing credibility with future customers is worse than annoying a section of current (and ageing) customers.

  6. I was gonna say that I’m not going to shop at Sears anymore, but then I realized that I have never shopped at Sears. That company has been on life support since the 80s, no?

    The “Jesus Uncrossed” skit is not even anti-religious. The only passion being ridiculed is Tarantino’s passion for blood-soaked revenge fantasies. If you don’t get that, you don’t have a sense of humor. Period.

    In all seriousness, this protest is nothing more than an attempt at censorship. I could understand putting pressure on companies to try to limit hate speech or something like that, but this ain’t it.

  7. That is so typical of religious fanatics. They take themselves way too seriously and they have no sense of humor whatsoever. No wonder so many young people are turning away from religion.

  8. Finally watched the skit: basically, DJesus comes back and this time there’s none of that turn-the-other-cheek crap. Typical Tarantino, the main target of the satire.

    Wouldn’t happen in Real Life, of course… lets see…. Jesus the prophet gets executed. So God sends along another one, this time with none of that pacifist bullshit…. Someone beginning with M…? (He who will not be ridiculed, lest some very humorless people decide to get angry and cause trouble)

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