Brain Shape Confirms Controversial Fossil as Oldest Human Ancestor

3

A seven-million-year-old skull found in the Djurab Desert in Chad may indeed represent the earliest known member of the human family. Researchers unveiled the specimen back in 2002 and made quite a splash with their claim that the ancient fossil was our ancestor. They assigned it to a new species,Sahelanthropus tchadensis (nickname: Toumaï) and said it was very close to the point at which the human lineage diverged from that of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. Critics, however, countered that the skull was probably an ape’s instead of that of a hominin (a creature on the line leading to us), given its primitive features. But a new analysis of the skull—specifically, its braincase—supports the discoverers’ claim that Toumaï is a hominin.


Thibaut Bienvenu of the Collège de France and his colleagues reconstructed Toumaï’s endocast—a cast of the interior of the braincase, which reveals the shape of the brain. Because the fossil skull is distorted and filled with a highly mineralized matrix, they had to do their reconstruction virtually, which meant imaging it with 3D X-ray synchrotron microtomography and then feeding that data into a program that allowed them to remove the matrix and correct the distortion on screen.

The resulting virtual reconstruction of the endocast reveals that Toumaï had a cranial capacity of 378 cubic centimeters—consistent with earlier estimates. This puts it within the range of chimp cranial capacity. In comparison, modern humans have brains around three times larger than that. But though Toumaï’s brain was apelike in its small size, it was apparently homininlike in other ways. In a presentation given on April 2 at the annual meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society, Bienvenu reported that the endocast shows strongly posteriorly projecting occipital lobes, a tilted brainstem, and a laterally expanded prefrontal cortex, among other hominin brain characteristics.

Written By: Kate Wong
continue to source article at blogs.scientificamerican.com

3 COMMENTS

  1. Seven million years old? Not six thousand four hundred? What can this signify? Does this call into question religious faith? Or, is this a hoax?

    Hmmm! Let me think; oh no, mustn’t do that!

    Dives head first into sand again.

  2. Why is bipedalism correlated with a laterally expanded prefrontal cortex?

    I assume the strongly posteriorly projecting occipital lobes are relative to the tilted brainstem, and hence are a measurement artefact. If not – same question.

    • In reply to #2 by God fearing Atheist:

      Why is bipedalism correlated with a laterally expanded prefrontal cortex?

      I assume the strongly posteriorly projecting occipital lobes are relative to the tilted brainstem, and hence are a measurement artefact. If not – same question.

      If I recall correctly from anatomy and anthropology, the tilted brainstem (and the positioning of the foramen magnum accomodating the tilted brainstem) indicates bipedalism as it facilitates an upright standing person to easily look forward rather than upward (other species have a foramen magnum at the back of the skull and a brainstem that facilitates looking forward from a quadrupedal stance, except for other apes where it is located somewhere between the bottom and and the back of the skull).

      Posterior projection of the occipital lobes is structurally inhibited by the location of the of the cerebellum in such a skull (quadruped), whereas the tilting of the brainstem allows for the cerebellum to decend and make space for the occipital to expand (biped).

      I am uncertain why the lateral expansion of the PFC correlates to bipedalism.

Leave a Reply