Days of wine – and bitterness

13

Former mayor Heather Tanguay and husband Jerry are leaving Palmerston North. Chris Hyde talks to them about socialism, wind farms and the happy and the horrifying times they have had in their favourite city.


When Palmerston North police knocked on the door of the office of the mayor, Heather Tanguay had no idea they were coming.

The knock happened in the middle of her campaign for re-election in 2007.

Heather and Jerry Tanguay have never spoken publicly about the events of that day.

Even in 2013 the experience strikes a raw nerve – it stings more than anything else in their 26 years in Palmerston North.

The police had arrived because they had caught the culprits repeatedly destroying her campaign signs.

The vandals were young and part of a youth group wing of a local church. One was a head student at a local school.

Police asked Heather if she wanted to prosecute them. She didn't, but demanded a face-to-face explanation and apology.

"We have to have a mayor that God can talk through," they told her.

"We were shattered by it," she says, tears streaming down her face. "It was a terrible experience."

Written By: Chris Hyde
continue to source article at stuff.co.nz

13 COMMENTS

  1. Sickening story and not just for the abuse by religion but their reaction; nice people, TOO nice.

    “We had to admit defeat” “if she wanted to prosecute them. She didn’t”

    No, you did not. Surrender in the face of intimidation is pathetic, you have enabled your abusers, well done.
    I have no sympathy for those without the courage to confront bullies.

    • In reply to #1 by Nodhimmi:

      Sickening story and not just for the abuse by religion but their reaction; nice people, TOO nice.

      “We had to admit defeat” “if she wanted to prosecute them. She didn’t”

      No, you did not. Surrender in the face of intimidation is pathetic, you have enabled your abusers, well done.
      I have no sympathy for those without the courage to confront bullies.

      They thought they were taking the higher road of forgiving them. Frequently, facing the person can settle more than tying up the courts. Unfortunately, (as I have learned) sometimes you need to battle it out in court to slam their face a few times so that their eyes are opened. ..but some people are arrogant, self-righteous, and will demonize you in order to feel justified in their actions.

  2. The police had arrived because they had caught the culprits repeatedly destroying her campaign signs.

    The vandals were young and part of a youth group wing of a local church. One was a head student at a local school.

    Police asked Heather if she wanted to prosecute them. She didn’t, but demanded a face-to-face explanation and apology.

    “We have to have a mayor that God can talk through,” they told her.

    “We were shattered by it,” she says, tears streaming down her face. “It was a terrible experience.”

    Bad call, and a sign of weakness in politics!

    They were given the chance to stop the nonsense and apologise, but offered defiance instead.

    Prosecution should have immediately followed. There was no apology!

    The failure to use laws to back up rights, invited the cheats and rogues to extend their dishonest campaign, get their people elected, and advance their influence. The results of appeasement are well known in history.

  3. Some people don’t have the confidence or courage to go to court and prosecute , especially against the church , the judges and everyone else will back the church as we have seen many times . I have a lot of sympathy for them

    • In reply to #4 by RichardofYork:

      Some people don’t have the confidence or courage to go to court and prosecute , especially against the church , the judges and everyone else will back the church as we have seen many times . I have a lot of sympathy for them

      Actually, this is in New Zealand, not USA. The judges would not back the church but the law.

      • In reply to #5 by currerbell:

        In reply to #4 by RichardofYork:

        Some people don’t have the confidence or courage to go to court and prosecute , especially against the church , the judges and everyone else will back the church as we have seen many times . I have a lot of sympathy for them

        Actually, this is in New Zealand, not USA. The judges would not back the church but the law.

        Indeed – and would receive wide support from the public for doing so.

  4. Refusing to prosecute is really symptomatic, because Free Thinkers, almost because we are such, don’t want to bother with the pettiness, the putting kids in jail or whatever. And you know for sure the other side would bewail the intolerance of someone against their own thoughts and religions. This is a discrimination case, plain and simple, a hate crime, and until we treat it as such, including prosecuting these poor brainwashed teenagers, nothing will change. Let their parents then get on their own megaphones (which they will), and at the same time, have to pay lawyers, plus damages and all. And if the town doesn’t prosecute, then we have to band together and sue the towns for sitting by.

    • In reply to #12 by aquilacane:

      Police don’t need her permission to prosecute. They caught them committing a crime, that’s all they need.

      The police do need co-operation from witnesses, but democracy does not last long if people refuse to prosecute and stamp out electoral malpractices!

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