Archbishop says dropping religion TV shows ‘dangerous’

0

Dropping religion from TV schedules would have "dangerous" consequences, the Archbishop of Canterbury has warned.


The Most Reverend Justin Welby said that abandoning religious programming would "cultivate ignorance".

He told the Radio Times that religious formats were the real "reality shows".

He also praised ITV's Strictly Kosher and Channel 4's show Islam: The Untold Story as examples of good religious programming.

The archbishop said: "For adults over a certain age who received little in the way of religious education at school – especially of an inter-faith variety – religious broadcasting is likely to be their best guide to the different faiths, not just of the people they see on the news but of the people they meet at the school gates, or queue next to at the post office."

He also said that there were some who believe faith and religious life should be kept behind closed doors.

Written By: BBC News
continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

NO COMMENTS

  1. Dropping religion from TV schedules would have “dangerous” consequences

    What evidence backs up which examples?

    abandoning religious programming would “cultivate ignorance”

    There’s no evidence people get their knowledge, of religion or anything else, from religious shows, but there is evidence atheists know more about religion than religious people do. (The same disparity occurs with science.)

    religious formats were the real “reality shows”

    Reality is provable, e.g. science. Religion can’t be provable, or even right (well, maybe one), because the beliefs of different religions are both incompatible and diverse.

    “The marvellous portrait of Manchester’s Jewish community in ITV’s Strictly Kosher is one example of how the media can help us to see the people around us as they really are.
    “Likewise, Channel 4′s Islam: the Untold Story gave viewers an opportunity to appreciate the rich and fascinating history of the Muslim faith.
    “Telling stories about ourselves and others, in a way that celebrates the full scope of what it means to be human: that for me is what makes a reality show.”

    How does he even know these shows were accurate, unless by comparing them against another data source, which we might as well stick to?

  2. I agree, a good factual programme about religion is interesting and often well worth watching. For example:

    Bible’s Buried Secrets

    However, I don’t quite think that this is the type or programming he is really worried about the TV channels dropping though is it.

    You can’t beat learning the truth about religion as an aid to becoming non religious yourself.

  3. Let’s set up a pre/post experiment that measures specific quantities before the programs are cancelled and periodically after the programs are cancelled. Then and only then could we say that this decision has any impact what so ever. Notice that this “intelligent” man doesn’t offer this as a solution.

  4. He told the Radio Times that religious formats were the real “reality shows”.

    But that is only his delusional “reality”.
    It is a property of “reality” that recognition of it, is based on evidence, and certainly not on “faith”! – Just more theist back-side-first thinking -
    (unless he means the “Big-Brother” type of contrived fake pseudo -”reality” show!)

  5. Quite the opposite, televising the kind of cosy religion he is thinking about on the fool’s lantern is cultivating ignorance of the worst kind and by one of the most influential methods.

    Some good programmes on the more interesting and controversial stuff would be illuminating especially if it focussed on the lack of evidence.

  6. The Most Reverend Justin Welby said that abandoning religious programming would “cultivate ignorance”.

    Isn’t it amazing the way that holy men get things exactly backwards? Religion relies on ignorance and superstition. Where does religion have its strongest hold over people? In the most poorly educated populations. That’s why it’s dying on its feet in the western European countries, and even in the USA, although more slowly there. Religion fosters ignorance.

    Of course the holy men stick together when presented with the increasingly godless society. Notice Welby’s slimy attempt to curry favour with the Jews and Muslims.

  7. What is bad in the UK is that the only classical music station worth listening to; Radio 3, sneaks in religious programmes. I’m fine listening to the great religious works of Bach et.al. especially if the galling lyrics are in a language I can’t understand, the music is sublime. The problem is that for the best part of two hours every week they broadcast an abomination called “Choral Evensong”, presumably they think that by shuffling in an aria from a Bach cantata, they can pass it off as a concert? All it does with me though is to get me to retune to Classic FM for 5 minutes until the Adverts and the inane chatter between the fragments of great music causes me to swear at the radio and reach for a CD.

    • In reply to #8 by Philoctetes:

      Exactly my behaviour until recently. I now have 5 or so European Classical stations cued up on my smart phone I rebroadcast to the radio. It has never been an enjoyable experience even when they once advertised it as “Evensnog”.

  8. …telling stories

    Then make it clear at the start of each program – ‘the following program is “real” in the extent that the content is delivered by real people with stories and anecdotes’.

    Danger, Will Robinson, danger – there are not enough shows cultivating free thinking!

  9. “Dropping religion from TV schedules would have “dangerous” consequences, the Archbishop of Canterbury has warned”

    … because it makes it much harder for them to advertise their illogical tax-exempt bullshit to potential new victims.

    Its dangerous to your Ponzi scheme Arch Bish, not to the country as a whole; you’re the danger to the country.

  10. In reply to #8 by Philoctetes:

    … classical music station

    Too bad ‘Evensong’ can’t be replaced with Karl Haas’ masterpiece ‘Adventures in Good Music’, a 60 radio program. I’m forever flummoxed why the programs can’t be re-broadcast.

    There is one lonely classical show on the car radio, m-f mornings only. Best part of my cable are the music channels. Baroque, chamber, and classical, and many others.

    • I agree. Used to listen to Karl on Public radio in the US. Fabulous music elucidated by one of the finest minds in all musicology. Miss that.

      In reply to #12 by bluebird:

      In reply to #8 by Philoctetes:

      … classical music station

      Too bad ‘Evensong’ can’t be replaced with Karl Haas’ masterpiece ‘Adventures in Good Music’, a 60 radio program. I’m forever flummoxed why the programs can’t be re-broadcast.

      There is one lonely classical show on the car radio, m-f morni…

  11. Seems to me the only dangerous consequences would be to the dear old CofE; less brainwashing of the huddled masses.

    Like others here I quite enjoy religious education programmes, as long as they are genuine educational programmes which teach the history, geography, psychology etc of religions. Songs of praise and the easter service do not qualify.

  12. The BBC is an excellent broadcaster, the best in the world in fact, and for being able to download so many free intelligent podcasts I am truly grateful. It would be worrisome if the BBC reduced science sociology, nature, exploration and philosophy programmes as they are insightful and educational.

    There is a new series ‘Tales from Ancient Greece’, http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/greekmyths, that should cover off mythology and keep Welby quiet surely. If the audience is to hear tales from Iron Age science fiction then ancient Greece is a good place to start. The stories of those who ride on a magic pony with the face of a woman and wings of an eagle, or talking shrubs and snakes or about men flying about without the aid of aviation devices are too much. I am still amused about the one in which baby Jesus crawls out of the cave and if he sees his shadow, it foretells an early spring here in the North East.

  13. “We would be cultivating ignorance where what we need is insight, and prejudice where we most badly need open minds.”

    The irony in that statement is mind blowing. Anyway, just replace ‘would be’ with ‘are’ and, there, all fixed. Just a slight verbage error. You’re welcome, Mr. PriestReligiousGuy.

    On a side note, N_Ellis, churches are not ponzi schemes. They are pyramid schemes. Ponzi schemes sometimes pay out to keep people coming. Churches only take and then pay upwards to the bosses.

  14. this is what is currently being shown on sky tv in the uk.
    http://www.believetvnetwork.com/
    http://www.olivetv.uk.com/watch-live-olive-tv/
    These are broadcast 7 days a week along with around 50 other religious channels.
    It about time we got our own atheist tv channel and start spreading our own message of reason, rational thinking, science and exposing religious privelige, discrimination, and harmfulness.

    Lets stop complaining and start doing. I’m sure richard dawkins has enough funds start a reason tv channel. We could put the god delusion documentary on at the same time as songs of praise and advertise it

  15. CofE are reverting to type with their archbishops. After the relatively sane and intellectual Rowan Williams it seems that the crazy faction characterised by the idiotic former A of C Carey is back in control in the persona of this Welby fool.

  16. would have “dangerous” consequences

    for who? (er whom?)

    “cultivate ignorance”.

    Of religion? is that so bad?

    real “reality shows”.

    Supernatural stuff is nor real.

    The Untold Story as examples of good religious programming

    No, it is good historical programming.

    religious broadcasting is likely to be their best guide to the different faiths, not just of the people they see on the news but of the people they meet at the school gates, or queue next to at the post office.”

    If he means historical or factual rather than use the word religious, I have no problem. In fact I am starting to see a trend here, better education for whomever wants it. (whomever?, bugger! … i’ll stick with science).

  17. Dangerous for con men, yes. Reduction in such programming could seriously impact their income. They need all the help they can get selling their snake oil. It is such nonsense, the only way to sell it is to persuade marks that everyone else believes it or at least considers it a plausibility.

    • In reply to #26 by GBile:

      “The Most Reverend” ????

      Sort of makes one wonder who “The Least Reverend” might be. Of course, here in the U.S, we have people who are known as “The Right Reverend” Whomever, which would suggest that there are also a few “Wrong Reverends” or at least “Left Reverends” out there.

      • In reply to #34 by IDLERACER:

        In reply to #26 by GBile:

        “The Most Reverend” ????

        Sort of makes one wonder who “The Least Reverend” might be. Of course, here in the U.S, we have people who are known as “The Right Reverend” Whomever, which would suggest that there are also a few “Wrong Reverends” or at least “Left Reverends” out…
        We have had these crazy titles debated before:reverend,very reverend,right reverend and most reverend.I am not sure what they are supposed to mean.Are we supposed to be more reverent towards these people as they get promoted within their organisation or does it mean they become more reverent? Who knows and who cares!

  18. So we will all be ignorant unless we watch ‘interfaith’ religious nonsense on tv? You couldn’t make it up could you! If I read once more that this silly man was recently ‘enthroned’ I am gonna break something !!!!

  19. Programs about the phenomenon that is religion can be interesting and informative, but I suspect the Archbishop is arguing from the viewpoint that religion is somehow a necessary part of the human experience. It’s not. He’s just part of the interest group that thinks it is. I’d like to see, as other posters have said, more programs on the history and phenomenon of music. But then, I’m a musician. For that matter, where are all the programs on the history of knitting?

  20. The thing is, he kind of has a point. culturally it’s important for the british public to be more aware of the religions that exist here and it’s part of the beebs remit to informa and educate. however i suspect he only wants the fluffy documentaries that show the nice characters and lovely stories they tell rather than ones about child rape and murder but i applaud his point, just need more balance.

    i propose a docu-reality type show called “know your enemy: what’s wrong with different people” or a weekly panel show with religious leaders invited to debate exactly what god thinks about the weeks events, maybe with physical chalenges to overcome any loggerheads

  21. My kids get RE lessons at school. I have a right as a parent to opt them out of RE, but choose not to do so – partly not to stigmatise them at school, but also to help them learn about religions (it’s a secular, state school – no indoctrination). I reckon if they learn (as they do) about all of the major faiths, they cannot but conclude that they cannot all be right, and there’s a high probability that none of them are right.

    In a sense, broadcast religious programmes (not that we watch any of them) serve a similar purpose. Some people are religious and want them; I don’t really have a problem with the public service broadcaster meeting their needs: the BBC has numerous channels if you want to watch or listen to something else.

    Would it be “dangerous” to drop any of them? No, that’s nonsense. Christianity seemed to do alright promoting itself prior to 1922.

Leave a Reply