End of the line for Christian radio network that predicted 2011 rapture

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Two days before the date his boss had predicted as the Apocalypse, Matt Tuter made an auspicious decision: He canceled the skywriters.


Family Radio, the Oakland-based evangelical network run by Harold Camping, had already spent more than $5 million on 5,000 billboards announcing Judgment Day — May 21, 2011 — according to tax documents. Now, Tuter said, he feared that the airplanes, which were to inscribe the warnings in the skies above major U.S. cities, were one expense too many for a business operating as if there really would be no tomorrow.



Two years later, Camping's predictive powers have been thoroughly discredited. But the financial reckoning that Tuter foresaw for Family Radio may be coming soon, according to public financial documents and current and former high-level Family Radio employees who spoke to this newspaper.



Among the indicators:



Former and current insiders allege the situation may be even worse than it appears, claiming donations have dropped almost 70 percent since the Rapture prediction proved incorrect, leading to numerous layoffs of longtime Family Radio staff members. Those insiders say the nonprofit mishandled the sales of the stations, reaping far less than they were worth, and is on the hook for millions of dollars to devotees who have loaned them money over the years. Since the failed prediction, at least two letters have been sent to the California Attorney General's Office requesting an investigation into the station sales and Family Radio's handling of donations. The office does not confirm or deny investigations.

Written By: Matthias Gafni
continue to source article at dailyfreeman.com

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    • In reply to #1 by prettygoodformonkeys:

      Radio silence from religion = music to my ears.

      Small potatoes. Not going away is Pat Robertson’s Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN). In this article on the Christian Right, Evangelicals, Reconstructionism, John Birch Society, there’s some stuff about CBN. It’s an eye-opening, sobering view on their strategies.

  1. I remember reading about a couple with a toddler and expecting another baby who gave away everything they had because of this guy. I still wonder about them and how they picked up the pieces afterward.

    • In reply to #3 by Kim Probable:

      I remember reading about a couple with a toddler and expecting another baby who gave away everything they had because of this guy. I still wonder about them and how they picked up the pieces afterward.

      There were also much more tragic reactions. Blood was spilled in the frenzy.

      Life savings were liquidated, fools were made, many lives ruined because some weirdo thumps a Bible. This is where Xianity trips me out. I can see having faith in a cosmic force, if one accepts the premise of its existence, that makes sense. If one accepts Jesus could fly, faith in Him makes sense. When does this become faith in St. Paul? When does this become faith in the Council of Nicea? When does it become faith in King James, or Harold Camping? Ultimately, their faith is in themselves. They don’t doubt themselves at all.

    • In reply to #3 by Kim Probable:

      I remember reading about a couple with a toddler and expecting another baby who gave away everything they had because of this guy. I still wonder about them and how they picked up the pieces afterward.

      These people seem to be young enough to work and dig themselves out.

  2. Give no thought for the morrow! HAR HAR HAR HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HArrrrgh!

    World without end! HAR HAR HAR HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HArrrrgh!

    I can’t help feeling a tad sorry for those he duped. We should hear their stories and broadcast those as a warning to others who order their lives around the ‘one book batshit method’ of making decisions.

  3. The idea of a rapture is so pathetically anthropocentric and evidentially wildly misguided, yet doubtlessly hoards of people will follow the word of the next moron who calculates an end date. That never ceases to amaze me.

  4. Who wouldn’t want their life work to survive them? To bring a benefit to the world greater then one’s self? Does he have no thought for the people he employees?

    If this is true, Camping is a narcissistic oger.

  5. Just a quick aside:

    This asshole’s prediction for the end of the world fell on the morning after the Senior prom at the high school where I work. All i could imagine was hundreds of Senior boys coercing their dates by saying to them ….”C’mon, c’mon, please???? You know we are all going to be dead tomorrow morning…. why not???? “

    I wonder how many small con men got their way because this large con man was listened to?

  6. Poetic justice. Camping made many of his followers bankrupt, it’s only right the radio network that broadcasted his drivel should now go bankrupt. Hopefully it will. I’m glad the stations he sold were to secular broadcasters and not religious groups.

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