NASA Announces Brightest Lunar Explosion Ever Recorded

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A boulder-sized meteor slammed into the moon in March, igniting an explosion so bright that anyone looking up at the right moment might have spotted it, NASA announced Friday.


NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office is reporting the discovery of the brightest impact seen on the moon in the eight year history of the monitoring program.

Some 300 lunar impact events have been logged over the years but this latest impact, from March 17, is considered many orders of magnitude brighter than anything else observed.

“We have seen a couple of others in the ‘wow’ category but not this bright,” said Robert Suggs, manager of NASA’s Lunar Impact Monitoring Program at Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The blast lasted only about a single second and shone like a 4th magnitude star—making it bright enough to see with just the unaided eye.

Written By: Andrew Fazekas
continue to source article at newswatch.nationalgeographic.com

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    • In reply to #1 by Alan4discussion:

      There are a lot of rocks flying around up there! We really should be monitoring and tracking them better!

      Simple answer to that is we don’t have any technology that can track objects this small. By the time it was even detectable it would be on you. It would be like trying to spot a bullet being fired at you.
      The meteor that struck Russia fits into that category too.
      The good news is that Nasa claims to have tracked all the likely planet killer objects (over half kilometer across)that we know of and none of them are likely to hit the Earth in the next hundred years.

      • In reply to #4 by mr_DNA:

        In reply to #1 by Alan4discussion:

        There are a lot of rocks flying around up there! We really should be monitoring and tracking them better!

        Simple answer to that is we don’t have any technology that can track objects this small. By the time it was even detectable it would be on you. It would be like trying to spot a bullet being fired at you. The meteor that struck Russia fits into that category too. The good news is that Nasa claims to have tracked all the likely planet killer objects (over half kilometer across)that we know of and none of them are likely to hit the Earth in the next hundred years.

        I’m not sure about that hundred years! They have tracked quite a few big ones, but there are thousands and perhaps millions which could do us serious mischief! There are certainly some identified near misses in the next hundred years. http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/apophis/

  1. did anyone witness it?

    it was March 17th. if no one did then we have yet another reason not to tollerate the sale of those ridiculous oversized green hats to english piss-heads who for one day in the year don’t mind admitting to having some irish ancestory

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