Saudi religious police boss condemns Twitter users

0

The head of Saudi Arabia's religious police has warned citizens against using Twitter, which is rising in popularity among Saudis.


Sheikh Abdul Latif Abdul Aziz al-Sheikh said anyone using social media sites – and especially Twitter – "has lost this world and his afterlife".

Twitter was the platform for those who did not have any platform, he said.

His remarks reflect Riyadh's concern that Saudis use Twitter to discuss sensitive political and other issues.

The conservative kingdom is believed to have seen the world's fastest increase in the uptake of Twitter, says the BBC's Sebastian Usher.

'Losing battle'

The sheikh's comments echo those of the imam of the Grand Mosque in Mecca in April who used his sermon – seen by millions on TV – to warn that Twitter was a threat to national unity, our correspondent says.

Earlier, Saudi Arabia's grand mufti, the kingdom's most senior Muslim cleric, had dismissed Twitter users as "fools".


continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

NO COMMENTS

  1. Under the guise of national unity and security to bash the opportunity for open conversation, these religious “police” are ridiculous to watch. Certainly hope the population will not be deterred by such petty accusations. But I guess isolation is religions’ best and only bet for keeping the populace in check.

  2. Saudi is at the core of much of the strife in the world with its agenda for and sponsorship of islamodomination of the world. Social media in the hands of the common people will undermine the verminous mullahs. This is what they are petrified of. The destruction of their hateful and pernicious scheme.

  3. Twitter was the platform for those who did not have any platform, he said.

    That is correct imbeciles! Because you do not openly permit freedom of thought and speech in your theocratic asylum they have to resort to means beyond your control.

  4. I think all religious leaders should be called “Grand Muftis”. The Grand Mufti of Mecca; The Grand Mufti of Rome; The Grand Mufti of Canterbury. It suits them perfectly. And their followers, the little Muffettes…

  5. From generation to generation, conservative forces have tried to stifle progress, and over and over again they have failed at that.

    That’s the funny thing: every time progress is made, those who oppose it are the last of their kind. They will always be remembered as the cranky people dreaming about days past, and who slowed down inevitable progress by fighting it tooth and nail. Is that the legacy they want to leave behind? Do they want their names to remain in history books to remind future children of who tried to make their lives harder?

    It’s the same with for example gay marriage. Those who oppose it now will be remembered by future generations as the ones who, in the face of overwhelming support and rational reasons for it, still were against it, thus making it harder for society to move forward. On the other hand, those who are for it will be remembered as heroes, human rights fighters and future minded people who changed the world.

    The Saudi religious police is fighting a losing battle, how can they not see it?

  6. Apparently,
    Skype has also been threatened by the Saudi powers that be. (no surprise).

    Every time one of these dinosaurs issues another new edict I cackle with glee. While the middle generation of Saudis and other Sunni Muslims elsewhere just roll their eyes and carry on tweeting and Skyping, the teens and young people there are developing a sense of resentment and disdain for the decrepit old clerics. What is happening is that the revolting old men in magical hats and dresses are coming to be seen as sad and pathetic, much the same as my view of Catholic Priests.

    I hope the clerics have their way and get these technologies blocked as they have threatened to do. It could be an important tipping point in that part of the world.

    From the same website, another article:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-21932432

  7. Sheikh Abdul Latif Abdul Aziz al-Sheikh should have a look at Twitter. It is designed to dumb down any discussion to an exchange of team colours. Surely this is the sort of thing he dreams of — content-free communication.

    • I’d go with Twitter any day; it rolls off the tongue much better than his own litany of a name…

      In reply to #14 by Roedy:

      Sheikh Abdul Latif Abdul Aziz al-Sheikh should have a look at Twitter. It is designed to dumb down any discussion to an exchange of team colours. Surely this is the sort of thing he dreams of — content-free communication.

    • Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s grand mufti, the kingdom’s most senior Muslim cleric, had dismissed Twitter users as “fools”.

      Pot – Kettle – black! : – Deluded – backside to the sky, comic in fancy-dress, calls superficial Twittering “foolish”!

  8. Didn’t the Christians and other reactionaries say the same thing about rock n’ roll in the 1950s ?

    Of course there’s nothing second class about the technology used by the Saudi armed forces. Quite a chunk of it for the purpose of keeping the ruling elite in power. Chief arms suppliers to Saudi Arabia? Let me guess, at No. 1 the USA ? Britain not far behind.

    Oh Oil, hallowed be thy name.

  9. The Church of Jesus tried to ban the printing press
    The Church of Stalin tried to ban the photocopier, or at least limit its’ use.
    The mullah’s try to ban, or at least limit, social media.

    Same old, same old…..

  10. “The more you tighten your grip, the more systems will slip through your fingers.”

    Religious leaders are losing their control faster each day. They’re clutching at straws now, trying to stop people communicating.

Leave a Reply