Calling ex-Muslim Imams and Mullahs

0

I spoke to Catherine Dunphy, Executive Director of the Clergy Project, at the Washington DC Women in Secularism conference end May about incorporating ex-Muslim imams and mullahs into the Clergy Project which is a confidential online community for faithless clergy.

If you are an imam and mullah who has finally seen the light, please get in touch with her. There have to be many – particularly since it must be hard keeping a straight face whilst speaking about peace and love (at least in English) when Islamism is slaughtering and terrorising left, right and centre.


Here are more details:

ClergyProject_exmuslims_Page_2

 

 

 

 

Other links of interest:

Written By: Maryam Namazie
continue to source article at freethoughtblogs.com

NO COMMENTS

  1. I dont quite understand the need for a “club” for ex religious leaders who are essentially athesists as opposed to open debate for all atheists together. Those “leaders” have not been chosen by Atheists as their leaders, its a bit misleading and quite often the ex religious people can be ranters or haters and are not as open minded as non corrupted Atheists. However anyway to get them to leave religion is good overall…

    • In reply to #1 by Light Wave:

      I dont quite understand the need for a “club” for ex religious leaders who are essentially athesists as opposed to open debate for all atheists together.

      It’s a place for clergy members who have lost their faith to get support from others who have been in similar situations and a way to find help leaving their position if they haven’t already.

      From their website:

      Currently, the community’s 455 plus members use it to network and discuss what it’s like being an unbelieving leader in a religious community. The Clergy Project’s goal is to support members as they move beyond faith. Members freely discuss issues related to their transition from believer to unbeliever including:

      Wrestling with intellectual, ethical, philosophical and theological issues

      Coping with cognitive dissonance

      Addressing feelings of being stuck and fearing the future

      Looking for new careers

      Telling their families

      Sharing useful resources

      Living as a nonbeliever with religious spouses and family

      Using humor to soften the pain

      Finding a way out of the ministry

      Adjusting to life after the ministry

    • In reply to #1 by Light Wave:

      I dont quite understand the need for a “club” for ex religious leaders who are essentially athesists a

      Cause islam kills whoever leaves. They need a bit more protection…

  2. Yeah I got the jist of the article and didn’t mean to sound unsympathetic, but in a world full of religious people, I’ve had to rationalise and reason practically by myself since age 8 and well I got through it with constant research and refusal to accept anything but what is instinctively true to my own rational heart….I do realise that its tough and they have to re-alter their perception, change lifestyles and maybe loose friends and family etc…..but its not the end of the world ….Its the beginning of the real world…..As I said I do Applaud any attempt to help people rationalise and escape religion – in fact are any of them speaking out about it annonomously or not ?

    • In reply to #3 by Light Wave:

      I do realise that its tough and they have to re-alter their perception, change lifestyles and maybe loose friends and family etc…..but its not the end of the world

      It might indeed FEEL like the end of the world when you lose your home, your job, your family and your friends and have to live in your car, like Jerry DeWitt, for example. Please use your imagination and understand that this loss of security can be very frightening for people.

    • In reply to #3 by Light Wave:

      Yeah I got the jist of the article and didn’t mean to sound unsympathetic, but in a world full of religious people, I’ve had to rationalise and reason practically by myself since age 8 and well I got through it with constant research and refusal to accept anything but what is instinctively true to m…

      I suggest you go back to the Clergy Project website and read some of the press coverage about newly “out” non-believing clergy before continuing to compare them to your individual situation. They have centered their lives and their family’s income on something they don’t believe in anymore. Their situation is different from yours.

  3. To all commentors – I do agree that its a good idea to help Anyone get away from religion .. I realise its quite different to my situation and is more dangerous for some people to denounce their religion – I wish Chris Hitchens was here, I’m not articulating sucessfully !!!

  4. Jehovah’s Witnesses are not violent at all, but being boycotted by friends and family when you leave the religious fold can be bad enough. Muslims are not like JWs though. Leaving a religion where violence is not that rare is a different story. Good luck.

  5. This is my first time commenting on this site. Before I submit my contribution to the robust and diverse discussions on this site I would like to render a brief insight into who I am. First of all and preeminent is that I am a follower of Jesus Christ. Thus I am a theist with a world view that is shaped by my belief in an omnipotent, omniscient, and omnipresent God. I am also a biologist and an avid reader of science related writings and materials. I like to think of myself as a cosmologist because I am curious about this hugely wonderful universe that was made just for our habitation and enjoyment. I am also an open minded thinker and I am willing to give up my faith in Christ if proof can be provided beyond a reasonable doubt that the resurrection did not occur because this is the foundation stone of Christianity. If the resurrection did not occur Christianity is dead. Now my first query is why are atheists theophobes and religiophobes? That is if atheists are these open-minded, fair-minded, liberal pursuers of truth and fairness why the invective and bigotry in regards to God and religion and Christianity in particular/

    • In reply to #9 by Tribforce:

      Now my first query is why are atheists theophobes and religiophobes? That is if atheists are these open-minded, fair-minded, liberal pursuers of truth and fairness why the invective and bigotry in regards to God and religion and Christianity in particular/

      Welcome Tribforce, I hope you stick around, we need more diverse opinions here. To answer your question many atheists, most of the ones I’ve known in person, neither hate nor are afraid of religion. Asking me “why do you hate God” is like asking “why do you hate Freud?” I don’t hate Freud, I just think he was wrong and that it doesn’t make sense to use him as the standard for psychology, we’ve learned a lot since Freud. So the same with religion, I don’t hate it, I just don’t think that myths from bronze age peoples who didn’t even know the age of the Earth or about the Big Bang are a good source for all our decisions about meaning and morality.

      Unlike some people here though I don’t completely dismiss religion. I think its worth studying scientifically and I think its reasonable to think that some of the basic ideas used to found the great religions probably have relevance to moral and other questions of human values. I think the idea of returning love for hate (which I think is the best idea from Jesus) has a lot of merit. And I certainly don’t hate people just because they are religious. As they say: some of my best friends are religious.

    • In reply to #9 by Tribforce:

      This is my first time commenting on this site.

      Welcome Tribforce. Richard Dawkins wrote in 2006 a great piece I’m sure you’ll find
      interesting. It’s entitled Atheists for Jesus

      And this is from the Wikipedia article on “Christian atheism”:

      “Jesus, although not seen as divine, is still a central feature of Christian atheism. Most Christian atheists think of Jesus as a wise and good man, accepting his moral teachings but rejecting the idea of his divinity. Hamilton said that to the Christian atheist, Jesus is not really the foundation of faith; instead he is a “place to be, a standpoint”. Christian atheists look to Jesus as an example of what a Christian should be, but they do not see him as God.

      Hamilton wrote that following Jesus means being “alongside the neighbor, being for him”, and that to follow Jesus means to be human, to help other humans, and to further mankind.”

      Maybe the (non)resurrection is not that important.

    • In reply to #9 by Tribforce:

      That is if atheists are these open-minded, fair-minded, liberal pursuers of truth and fairness why the invective and bigotry in regards to God and religion and Christianity in particular

      This is a generalisation and not correct in any way. Like Red Dog, I do not hate someone just because they are a christian, muslim or whatever. However, I do hate the things that some of these people do in the name of their religion. Probably because of my haemophilia I have a particular dislike of JWs as I find it hard to like anyone who would sit back and watch their child suffer and die when treatment was available, although the Schaible’s and their weird sect, who deny all medicine, are worse.

      I do not hate Marx, although I certainly do not agree with everything he wrote/said there was some stuff worth thinking about. Red Dog mentioned a couple of decent things attributed to Jesus and I would happily go along with them. However, when those interpretations of the bible cause suffering I will fight against them, I would not deny a women an abortion or contraception and deny condoms in the attempt to combat HIV. The list of evils perpetuated in the name of religion is endless and I think if you are more honest with your questions will find that the hatred you note, it is a hatred of what a religion does, not a hatred of religion in general.

      As for the question about a god, obviously there is going to be little or no respect for that concept from atheists, by definition the word atheism is a rejection of the notion of gods. However, that is not hatred only a thought brought about by logical thinking. You mentioned proving beyond reasonable doubt in one of your arguments. I do not normally get into exist/not exist debates as they are mostly pointless but as you cannot prove beyond reasonable doubt the existence of a god you should expect scepticism.

      You should also realise that atheists do not have one mindset, atheism is not a religion with its dogma or rules or customs etc, the only thing common to us is our rejection of a notion of gods, as for politics, philosophies etc, there will be a vast mixture and difference among us. However, for us, as thinkers, we can change a lot easier when something we have believed is shown to be wrong, that is not the case with a lot of religions where indoctrination from an early age creates a strict mindset that is hard to alter.

    • In reply to #9 by Tribforce:

      I am willing to give up my faith in Christ if proof can be provided beyond a reasonable doubt that the resurrection did not occur.

      Um, if I may state the obvious, the onus is on you to prove that it did occur. But before you do that, perhaps you can give us some evidence that he ever even existed. I know a big chunk of the world’s population believes that he did. However, a similarly large number also believe that Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster in fact still exist, so popularity contests don’t really prove anything.

    • In reply to #9 by Tribforce:

      This is my first time commenting on this site. Before I submit my contribution to the robust and diverse discussions on this site I would like to render a brief insight into who I am. First of all and preeminent is that I am a follower of Jesus Christ. Thus I am a theist with a world view that is sh…

      I have not one atom of transcendentalism in my body.

      I don’t think that you can prove a negative (resurrection didn’t happen), but presumably something happened. There is well known material about the conflation and adaption of stories, over time, and most bible stories seem to be structured from bits of other, older stories. Folk stories, mythology and even family stories go through the same processes.

      Like the Christian god, many ancient gods had several allotropes, think of Janus, Shiva, and many members of the Greco–Roman panoply; many of the things which Jesus did, appear in earlier, more primitive forms. I tell a story about my mother, which I firmly believed to be accurate, until she told me that it was, in fact, a mixture of two stories. Conflation seems to be an unconscious and unplanned process.

      The resurrection can be seen as a retelling of the primeval story of the rising from the dead of the corn god. It’s no coincidence that Easter is in the spring, the period of re-growth, and Christmas is at midwinter, the time of the rebirth of the sun.

      So even though it is not possible to prove that the resurrection did not occur, it is very easy to see that the events in Jerusalem, whatever they were, would lend themselves over time to conflation with other god or occult stories, resulting in the compelling narrative which was written down a couple of hundred years after the events.

      Having said which, I totally agree with you about the undue vehemence and lack of charity or even courtesy displayed by some, too many, of the contributors to this site.

      I hope that you enjoy the rest of us, and that you think about the better contributions you find here

    • In reply to #9 by Tribforce:

      I am also an open minded thinker and I am willing to give up my faith in Christ if proof can be provided beyond a reasonable doubt that the resurrection did not occur because this is the foundation stone of Christianity.

      Welcome to RD.net.

      Any proof for the resurrection needs to be provided by Christians, as we’re not here to falsify your individual beliefs.

      As a self-professed open minded thinker, have you read anything by Bart D. Erhman?

  6. Moderators’ message

    Please remember that our Terms and Conditions require comments to be on the topic of the OP. There is already potential for this thread to veer off onto a subject which, although potentially interesting, has nothing to do with this new initiative focusing on ex-imams and ex-mullahs.

    To submit something for consideration as a new discussion topic, please go to http://www.richarddawkins.net/discussions and click on Submit Discussion, having first read the Guidance/FAQ notes alongside it.

    Further off-topic comments posted on this thread will be removed.

    Thank you

    The mods

Leave a Reply