Oklahoma Summer Camp Caters To Non-Religious Kids

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A Green Country camp that was in the center of a controversy over a fundraiser is teaching kids about science this week.


Organizers for Camp Quest were holding a fundraiser at a Broken Arrow restaurant in April, when the restaurant's owner learned it was a camp for non-religious kids and asked them to leave. Despite that dust up, dozens of children are spending the week outdoors with like-minded friends.

Haydn Kirkpatrick is 16 years old and said she's been waiting all year for this one week.

"It's the best time of my life," said 16-year-old Haydn Kirkpatrick.

She said it's the only time she can relax and not worry about being judged. Kirkpatrick is an atheist, something that she says doesn't come easy, living in Oklahoma.

"A lot of the times I feel like I can't tell people, because I feel like they won't be friends with me or their parents will think, 'Oh, I don't want them to hang out with that child. She's an atheist.' Because it tends to turn into a curse word," she said.

Written By: Dan Bewley
continue to source article at newson6.com

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  1. They were asked to leave because they weren’t religious? Restaurant owners must have spare cash to burn in the US.

    I think the situation in the US has a way more partisan overtone than here in Europe. Seems a bit “black and white”.

    • In reply to #1 by roxyrox:

      They were asked to leave because they weren’t religious? Restaurant owners must have spare cash to burn in the US.

      The owner of Oklahoma Joe’s did not want to be party to a non-religious organization – “goes against our Christian philosophy”. Praise the lord and pass the bbq sauce.

  2. Advertising this as non-religious is probably just a red flag. I suspect there are no religious or anti-religious activities, just science activities, and the usual summer fun. If they are learning to debunk Christianity, fine, but if not, no need to panic the Christians.

    I was head instructor at a computer summer camp. Religion just did not come up. It was irrelevant. Kids were learning to program computers. We did not advertise it as non-religious. I assume we had a mix of atheists and Christians. It just never came up.

    • In reply to #3 by Roedy:

      I suspect there are no religious or anti-religious activities

      CQ:”everything is designed to be religion free, and religious kids are welcome, also.”

      One camp’s activity was for kids to ‘disprove the existence of the Invisible Pink Unicorn’. (for a while, any kid who could do it would win a money note signed by RD)

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