Want to Know Why Texas Is STILL Arguing about Evolution?

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Many have been mystified that, even in the 21st century, Texas remains embroiled in a heated debate over evolution. In 2008 and 2009, for example, creationists on and off the State Board of Education insisted that new science curriculum standards for Texas public schools include requirements that would open classroom doors to anti-evolution junk science. The state board is set to adopt new science textbooks and other instructional materials for public schools this year.


But the argument over evolution in Texas really isn’t much of a surprise. That’s because the creationists have proudly rejected out of hand the overwhelming scientific evidence behind evolution. They have reveled, as former state chairman Don McLeroy infamously said, in “standing up to experts.”

In fact, McLeroy — a self-described “young Earth creationist” who lost his re-election bid in 2010 — continues to do so. Last month he agreed to be interviewed by Steven Novella, who is president of theNew England Skeptical Society (NESS). You can find the posts about that interview on the NESS blog, NeuroLogicalBlog. But if you don’t have time to check out those posts, just look at one to understand that it’s pointless to engage McLeroy in debate here. It’s pointless because, for people like McLeroy, “evidence” is an almost meaningless word. The sources and strength of evidence are irrelevant if they don’t align with their particular ideological point of view. McLeroy writes (to Novella) about their discussion:

“I admit that I do not have the time to read all the technical articles and read all the links you have referred to, but I do not admit that I am unable to judge the adequacy of the evidence evolutionists have presented for evolution. I have read the popular literature of highly acclaimed evolutionists; I have thought about how much evidence is required to demonstrate evolution. And, I have found it unconvincing.”

Written By: Dan – TFN Insider
continue to source article at tfninsider.org

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  1. McLeroy – I admit that I do not have the time to read all the technical articles and read all the links you have referred to, but I do not admit that I am unable to judge the adequacy of the evidence evolutionists have presented for evolution.

    Being too ignorant to know the limits of their very limited capabilities, – and even more limited knowledge, is a feature of fundamentalists.

    (God-did-it-by-mysterious-magic …. See – I know everything!!! Who needs edjukayshun?)

    • In reply to #2 by Stevehill: If you care at all about science education in the US, then you should care, because with Texas being such a large state and having a centralized textbook selection process, their standards and the materials they select have an impact on the whole country.

  2. I think people as adults should not be allowed to use technology unless they support the principles of science. Sorry you cannot use fossil fuels unless you understand that they come from fossils. Impractical for many reasons I already have streaming through my head but a nice fantasy that people who don’t accept science cannot benefit from it.

  3. If one finds the supporting evidence of evolution to be unconvincing?
    Then it is clear that such a person lacks the ability to think and apply reason!
    And therefore is as thick as pigshit!

  4. McLeroy’s comments about evolution remind me of the Guiness ads in the 1970s :

    I don’t like it, because I’ve never tried it” !

    Such a busy man, and so little time to find out about what he is objecting to ! Funny, if it wasn’t so serious.

  5. There is of course another linked article in this website about why people do not accept scientifically proven facts as against their cherished beliefs. It’s as if accepting the proven facts is somehow an admission that life will proceed from now on by empiricism, and this is a problem because it means you have to compete on a level playing field. Empiricism is the ultimate meritocracy, and when you look at the people most vocal about this, they seem to be the same ones who think they stand the most to lose by advancement on merit. For whatever reason, evolution and climate change are the most visible issue. Perhaps giving in to the science on this seems to these people as tantamount to giving up the unfair advantages they have had in the first place that has allowed them to stay in power.

    Perhaps there is also an element of fear that all cherished beliefs will be subject to this scrutiny: in other words, give up on challenging the science of evolution and pretty soon we’ll be talking about how white settlers stole all this land in Texas from Mexico, and in part because they didn’t want to give up slavery. It’s as if something in the deep recesses of their minds tells them their myths are just myths and they can’t face it.

  6. When debating a fool, sooner or later you will descend down to his level. We learned that a long time ago, so why persist in beating this dead horse? Why persist reinforcing these deluded people into thinking their ideas matter enough to be debated.

    • In reply to #15 by esmith4102:

      When debating a fool, sooner or later you will descend down to his level. We learned that a long time ago, so why persist in beating this dead horse? Why persist reinforcing these deluded people into thinking their ideas matter enough to be debated.

      I quite agree! But, unfortunately, in places like Texas apparently, such people have political influence and can do much harm, for example by having pseudoscience and superstition inserted in school curricula. Such delusional people do not see the issue as a “dead horse” but as an ongoing need to have their superstitious beliefs recognized by the state and established in its educational system. When whole communities are given over to delusions of this sort, sound education needs to be protected all the more. Tedious, yes, but necessary.

  7. Using the phrase ‘intelligent design’ strikes me as an oxymoron. I see no intelligence whatsoever in their argument. I would give Texas back to the Mexicans. But then some idiots in the Pennsylvania school system tried that ‘intelligence’s’ argument a few years ago. Luckily they were beaten back by real intelligence. Hopefully, Texas will do the same thing.

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