A New Age – Part 3 in the March of Reason Series – YouTube

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"A New Age" – Part 3 in "The March of Reason" Series Here is part 3 in the March of Reason series. It isn't necessary to have seen the first two, since each film stands on it's own. This third episode touches on New Age beliefs, psychics, alternative medicine, religion's treatment of women, and a few other topics. As in the first two films, I alternate interviews of believers with atheist speakers and performers at the 2012 Reason Rally in Washington D.C. Special thanks to Scott Fray and Madeline Greco of http://LivingBrush.com (three-time World Champions in the International Body Painting Competition in Austria) for the use of the footage I shot of their spectacular show "Arise the White and Wintry Queen." I am in awe of their talents.

Written By: Scott Burdick
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  1. A timely reminder of why I have a loathing of all things religious. Of course I exempt the art, music, architecture etc. which are entirely human products.

    Jeez the natural world is difficult enough to understand without all those witch doctors, shamans, priests, tea leaf readers and all those other charlatans, confusing things !

  2. Although this was entertaining, I felt it was a bit scattered. It went from New Agers’ views on spirituality, woo, alternative medicine to clips from the Reason Rally to atheists expressing their views – even quoting Carl Sagan to views on life after death from new agers, Christians from the Reason Rally to atheists to various views on morality…to women dying in childbirth…to contraception….missionaries hijacking technology…. The title does not reflect the content; I think it needs to be changed.

    When I travel I have come across memorials that list people’s names who have died in wars, through oppression, etc. Perhaps a list memorializing the names of people who have died for religious causes should be named.”X” died in childbirth because of religious advice prohibiting sterilization…” Perhaps one day a marble wall or monument or at least digital site will be built for these individuals.

  3. Well!
    Having now watched the whole thing .I’m happy that there is now a movement to contribute to the atrophy of quasi religious nonsense.
    Common sense to trump dogma and social slavery!

  4. Loved it! It was hotchpotch of ideas and counter-arguments as QuestioningKat #4 mentioned, however this had the effect of keeping me on my toes whilst watching, ( how is this going to turn out?)

    I found the airy-fairy new age nonsense spouted by a couple of the interviewees particularly troubling. Why do so many women think see the world through this lens? I feel embarrassed on their behalf, especially the naive comment made that many atheists are better Christians than Christians!

    • Thanks, Nitya. Yes, I meant this full version with all five parts to be more like a book, with each section akin to a chapter covering a topic. My hope is that by jumping from chapter to chapter it is obvious how all these religious, new age, and pseudo-scientific medical beliefs are no different from one another in the way they rely on wishful thinking rather than reason and evidence.

      After all, is “channeled readings from purported ET sources” any different than the Angel Moroni appearing to Joseph Smith? Or Paul’s road to Damascus? Or Psychics?

      The Christian may watch this and find those hearing voices from aliens crazy and vice-a-versa, but by seeing them all together along with the presentation of how one uses reason and logic to evaluate these claims, I’m hoping some people will make the connection.

      Reason versus superstition is the overall theme I had in mind to tie them all together, but it may be that I didn’t make that clear enough.

    • In reply to #6 by Nitya:

      Why do so many women think see the world through this lens?

      I can give a few really good ideas, but I usually get slammed for being politically incorrect. Here’s a few: We are drawn towards understanding and empathizing other people’s feelings. The aspects of belief that involve gratitude, feeling, empathy, admiration, relationships, and feeling a connection to “God” others, etc. are magnets for us. It is not that we are unable to intellectualize topics, we seem to avoid them in personal social situations. At a party, women will talk about their relationships, personal issues, etc. while men may do the same but topics then move towards sports and maybe politics or some other impersonal topic.

      Belief can involve pretty things. Tarot cards are pretty as Greta Christina mentioned. There are hundreds of different decks each illustrated by different artists. Some cards have words – compassion, creativity, joy, abundance, etc. by reading these types of cards you get an impression that you can relate to what is said thereby forming a mini relationship/connection to what is being said. Stained glass and other objects may have utilitarian purposes, but it also makes an attractive room/building. What’s not to like about bling?

      Belief also provides community which is similar to an extension of family. It keeps people unified and women general like this sort of thing.

      Now ask yourself how is this website like this? How is the atheist movement like this? ——In general – It’s not.

      • In reply to #8 by QuestioningKat:

        In reply to #6 by Nitya:

        Why do so many women think see the world through this lens?

        I can give a few really good ideas, but I usually get slammed for being politically incorrect. Here’s a few: We are drawn towards understanding and empathizing other people’s feelings. The aspects of belief that i…

        I have to agree, particularly with your reference to notions of community and belonging, ( though not so sure about the attractive objects connection). There is the community of Librans, for instance. It’s harmless and a small gathering can empathise about the struggles we “well balanced” folk have negotiating this chaotic world. It’s in an almost jocular mood that members of such a group conspire to leave their critical faculties at the door and just go with the flow.

        In stark contrast is a community such as this, where one really has to have one’s wits about them in order to survive with self esteem intact. It’s this very aspect that appeals to me, because I really can’t fake believing in something that I find unbelievable.

      • In reply to #8 by QuestioningKat:

        In reply to #6 by Nitya:

        Why do so many women think see the world through this lens?

        I can give a few really good ideas, but I usually get slammed for being politically incorrect. Here’s a few: We are drawn towards understanding and empathizing other people’s feelings. The aspects of belief that i…

        You may think its strange for me to reprise this discussion, but I’ve had some more thoughts on the subject of women and religion and I’m keen to know your thoughts.

        Here goes; I has been said that women think subjectively and men think objectively. In my experience this appears to be true for the most part. I’ve become aware that posts from Christians also involve a great deal about themselves as people and seem to give a more rounded picture of who they are as opposed to the regular user. These personal details become part of the narrative and add an extra dimension to their posts.

        This personal element in religions could be the hook that draws in the female adherent. Just a thought.

  5. I did enjoy some of the amusing interpretations of the Bible; obviously some people are privy to god’s inner most thoughts, but, in the most humble and modest of ways of course.

    I felt strong sympathy for Sarah Womack. No child deserves a father like hers.

    • I agree with you about feeling sorry for Sarah Womack. She actually gave Breanne, my friend who was helping me conduct those interviews, her phone number on a piece of paper because she was so intrigued that we were atheists. But we talked about it later and didn’t think it would be a good idea to contact a 14 year old and talk to her about atheism. Sad as it is to see her so indoctrinated, it just didn’t seem like the right way to go about it. Maybe the encounter will plant a questioning seed in her mind that she will pursue on her own sometime.

      In reply to #10 by Stafford Gordon:

      I did enjoy some of the amusing interpretations of the Bible; obviously some people are privy to god’s inner most thoughts, but, in the most humble and modest of ways of course.

      I felt strong sympathy for Sarah Womack. No child deserves a father like hers.

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