India Supreme Court orders curb on sales of acid

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India's Supreme Court has ordered federal and state governments to regulate the sale of acid in an attempt to reduce attacks on women.


The court said that acid should be sold only to people who show a valid identity card.

Buyers will also have explain why they need the chemical and sales will have to be reported to the police.

There will also be more compensation for victims. There are an estimated 1,000 acid attacks a year in India.

The victims, who have to live with terrible disfigurements, are mainly women and are often targeted by jealous partners, correspondents say.

In Thursday's ruling, the Supreme Court ordered that acid should be not be sold to anyone under the age of 18. It also ruled that there should be no bail allowed for the offence.

In addition, victims of acid attacks will be entitled to more financial help from state governments – the court said compensation of at least 300,000 rupees (£3,320; $5,000) must be paid to help rehabilitate them after their ordeal.

Written By: BBC News
continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

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  1. About time…. Let’s hope this helps to someday eliminate this inhuman practice. It’s not a lot but it’s always refreshing to get some bit of good news from that part of the world.

  2. At the risk of pessimism…

    This is great, but unfortunately it won’t do much to treat the root of the problem. The less-than-noble aspect of human ingenuity is that people can always find alternative ways to inflict pain and suffering on eachother, and I’d imagine any number of readily available corrosive substances will have the “desired” effect.

    • In reply to #2 by The Devout Atheist:

      At the risk of pessimism…

      This is great, but unfortunately it won’t do much to treat the root of the problem. The less-than-noble aspect of human ingenuity is that people can always find alternative ways to inflict pain and suffering on eachother, and I’d imagine any number of readily available…

      Such as? What corrosive substances that are readily available and cheap in the market can have the equivalent effect of concentrated mineral acids to distort women’s face? Your comment lack depth.

    • In reply to #3 by A3Kr0n:

      Curbing acid sales does absolutely nothing to solve the problem, which is people wanting to hurt other people. Now they’ll just use caustic soda instead. Or fire. Or poison. Or…

      Caustic Soda? Really?? Caustic soda is solid unlike concentrated sulfuric and nitric acids. Please don’t make ignorant comments. How many incidents have you heard of people throwing caustic soda?

      • In reply to #5 by prabo.bhil:

        In reply to #3 by A3Kr0n:

        Curbing acid sales does absolutely nothing to solve the problem, which is people wanting to hurt other people. Now they’ll just use caustic soda instead. Or fire. Or poison. Or…

        Caustic Soda? Really?? Caustic soda is solid unlike concentrated sulfuric and nitric acids. Please don’t make ignorant comments. How many incidents have you heard of people throwing caustic soda?

        Trio jailed for gang rape and caustic soda attack on teenager

        …A neighbour who heard the girl’s cries found her with clumps of skin coming off her body. She was rushed to hospital with more than 50% burns and doctors feared she might die. A year on, she is permanently disfigured, faces further surgery and skin grafts and continues to undergo counselling for nightmares and panic attacks.

        Disfigured Vermont Woman Receives Face Transplant

        …More than 80 percent of Tarleton’s body was burned in the attack and she was placed in a medically induced coma for three months. Even though Tarleton, 44, endured more than 55 surgeries to treat her numerous chemical burns, she was left disfigured, legally blind and unable to move her neck.

          • In reply to #14 by prabo.bhil:

            In reply to #12 by Katy Cordeth:

            Trio jailed for gang rape and caustic soda attack on teenager

            Acid attack victims

            vs.

            Caustic soda attack victims

            Now, have I got my point across?

            Not really. You’ve just Googled acid attack victim and caustic soda attack victims and hyperlinked to the results. Do you mean that the first of these searches yields 82,000,000 hits compared to the second’s measly 938,000?

            Call me when you make it to a million, caustic soda attacks. Until then I’m not interested.

          • In reply to #15 by Katy Cordeth:

            Call me when you make it to a million, caustic soda attacks. Until then I’m not interested.

            Did you calculate the ratio? That’s important.

            The point is that to get hurt by NaOH require long exposure time as compared to battery acid (sulfuric acid).

            Acid attack is generally throw and run attack. That’s the main concern. Not like dousing as your links suggest for NaOH or KOH attacks.

            Do you know that you can hold NaOH beads in your hand as long as your hand is dry and atmosphere is not strongly humid?

            Put your finger for a second in conc. NaOH cold solution in a beaker you will have itchy feeling. Same with conc. HCl. You can keep conc. HCl in your palm without any harm.

            If you do that same for conc. sulfuric acid, you will have a burning sensation. Don’t try this.

  3. In reply to #7 by Smill:

    In reply to post 5. Don’t be so quick to call someone ignorant. If you don’t know how caustic soda can pose a ‘splashing risk’ then you have obviously never made your own soap.

    Caustic soda in water at high concentration level is corrosive but mild as compared to the corrosion caused by concentrated sulfuric or nitric acids. If caustic soda spill at your skin you have enough time to wash it with copious amount of water before irreversible damage is caused but in case of sulfuric or nitric acids you don’t.

  4. In reply to by Smill:

    To add: the point is, the problem isn’t the weapon, it’s the mind attached to the hand that wields it.

    That’s right. But it’s always better to have something done than just waiting for every lunatic to behave sane and doing nothing about it.

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  6. It’s sad that this discussion has somehow degenerated into a pointless debate about whether caustic soda attacks are as bad as acid attacks. Most of the news about that part of the world alternate from bad to awful. At least here, we’re hearing SOMETHING positive for once, even if it probably won’t have as big an impact as we would want it to.

    I think this is a typical case of us wanting things to be fixed overnight. We should know better.

  7. Seems to be a bit of an argument about whether one attack is worse than another attack. I think not.

    THE FUCKING ATTACK IS WRONG!

    The Indian Supreme Court’s action will not solve the problem, but it is vastly better than no action, and will hopefully lead to a series of better and more effective steps.

  8. When I read that headline, I’m like “Damn they sell acid in India.” But on the serious side I totally agree with (#18) SomersetJohn. It appears to be minimal effort for a major issue. Something more serious should be done, fast. It’s hard to figure the mindset of these kinds of peoples.

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