Irish President signs Protection of Life During Pregnancy Bill into law

0

PRESIDENT MICHAEL D Higgins has signed the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Bill 2013 into law.


A statement from his office said that in accordance with Article 31 of the Constitution, President Higgins convened a meeting of the Council of State to discuss the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Bill 2013 yesterday.

Law

President Higgins has now signed the Bill into law, meaning it does not have to be forwarded to the Supreme Court to determine whether it is “repugnant to the Constitution” – or unconstitutional, in layman’s terms.

Now that the bill has been signed into law, it becomes the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act. A copy of the new act will be sent to the registrar of the Supreme Court to hold on file, while the bill will also be placed on the Irish Statute Book.

The act legally gives a woman access to an abortion where there is a real and substantial risk to her life, including risk of suicide.


continue to source article at thejournal.ie

NO COMMENTS

  1. The act legally gives a woman access to an abortion where there is a real and substantial risk to her life, including risk of suicide.

    You actually have to threaten with suicide before your opinion is taken into concern?

    That’s just bad politics.

    • In reply to #3 by Tyler Durden:

      Ireland is, finally, dragged kicking and screaming into the 20th century.

      Congrats to all involved. This is important legislation, for so many reasons.

      Hopefully they will take the final step soon, and allow women to have absolute rights regarding their own bodies.

    • In reply to #3 by Tyler Durden:

      Ireland is, finally, dragged kicking and screaming into the 20th century.

      Congrats to all involved. This is important legislation, for so many reasons.

      I’m afraid that you are quite wrong Tyler. I don’t know which country you live in, but this Bill has been widely misreported, even in Ireland. All it does is confirm a right that already exists, to have an abortion when the mother’s life is in real and imminent danger; presumably that decision belongs to the senior doctor on duty.

      Secondly, it confirms the existing right, granted by the Irish and European courts, to an abortion, if the woman is in real danger of taking her own life. However an abortion may only be granted on the word of two psychiatrists and one gynaecologist, who must confirm that the woman’s profession of suicidal ideation is genuine.

      IT DOES NOT, on pain of fourteen years jail, permit abortion under any other circumstances, including fatal foetal abnormality, a danger to the woman’s health, the prospect of the woman’s life being in danger later in the pregnancy, not wishing to have more children, a danger to the woman’s psychological health, the emotional ability of the woman to care for a child, or a threat to her career, education or financial ability to rear a child.

      The Bill, now an Act, actually diminishes the woman’s existing rights to abortion, since it hedges the presently untrammelled right of a suicidal woman, by making her choice of abortion dependent on the word of three senior specialist doctors – a consensus as unlikely to ever be realised as that of four male witnesses to rape in a Sharia court.

      Add to this the fact that every hospital in Ireland has fundamentalist Catholic snitches, who are just itching to report any irregularities to the police, health authorities, government, RC organisations… and you have a picture of virtually non-existent abortion rights.

      Before this row blew up, as a result of the Savita Halappanavar case, they were already trying to prosecute social workers for arranging or encouraging women to go to England for abortions. They have finished the campaign against the Act now, and they are already turning their attentions back to social workers.

      It is useless for the pro-choice movement to pursue changes in Irish law any further. The strategy now, the only kind, charitable or productive one for the women who find themselves in the unenviable situation of needing an abortion in Ireland, is to develop a national organisation, privately funded, which will provide counselling, financial assistance, organisation, transport, facilities in the UK, aftercare and support, to those women who are denied the services they require in their own country. It is useless to waste time and energy on trying to change the politico-religious network which controls reproductive law in Ireland.

  2. The devil will be in the details. Someone will have to determine whether a woman faces a real and substantial risk, and what that actually means. Are there going to be protections for doctors and/or pregnant women who get that decision “wrong”? Different doctors and hospitals may have different views on this standard. Then query whether insurance or national health plans will be tailored such that any questionable procedure will not be paid for. The same for risk of suicide. Who is going to decide that? A psychological evaluation isn’t like taking someone’s temperature. Meanwhile the patient, already under considerable stress, will have to await the decision.

    Perhaps this is a good crack in the edifice, but people who come up with these compromise laws need to think about what they actually entail.

  3. I hope he was uncareful, and the removal of a tumor, a vial of blood, drinking a glass of wine, smoking a cigarette while pregnant is inadvertently illegal.

    It is ridiculous, equating a single cell with a trilllion-cell baby. A fertilised egg is no more a baby than a blood cell is.

  4. Most commentators suggest that this was the prudent course of action. If it was referred to the supreme court (the other choice he had), the decision would be legally binding. Signing it into law means it can be legally challenged. So in one sense it’s good that Ireland has taken a tiny step out of the dark ages and closed this 20+ year old legal blackhole. In another it’s highly that this thing will drag on for years as anti-abortion groups like Youth Defence League (a militant Catholic group) take potshots at it.

    • In reply to #8 by locka:

      Most commentators suggest that this was the prudent course of action. If it was referred to the supreme court (the other choice he had), the decision would be legally binding. Signing it into law means it can be legally challenged. So in one sense it’s good that Ireland has taken a tiny step out of…

      I agree about the militant RCs, they will keep the lawyers in well paid employment for years. There are many such groups, of note is the Iona Institute, billed as an intellectual powerhouse of Catholicism, but much more like a clutch of skilful, media savvy spin doctors.

      Notable by its silence is the Opus Dei movement, which is powerful in Ireland, but has uttered not one word (that I have heard), on this matter. Its silence makes me suspicious that the vocal movements are front organisations, or at a minimum very heavily influenced, by this sinister outfit. It’s an old tactic, beloved of Lenin and Sinn Fein amongst others.

      Watch this space for a new political party.

Leave a Reply