Lawrence Krauss: Atheism and the Spirit of Science | TVO

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The unmovable mover, the first cause, the Big Bang. For centuries, we have grappled with the moment of creation: How did something come from nothing? Physicist Lawrence Krauss says it just does. In fact, he says 70% of the energy in our universe is contained in the empty space between quarks, atoms, and galaxies. He sits down with Steve Paikin to discuss the notion of a creator-less universe, and how science can be spiritual.


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  1. Lone the interviewers face when Krauss says, ” it makes god more irreverent and that’s a great thing! “

    Spiritual/physical intersection?!? What does that mean? They do try so hard, don’t they?

    Yes, it is not the answers but the questions that drives us!

    Gee, no faith, no life? I think I could have found a sharper word than pompous for the cardinal’s inanity.

    I saw a video made by that friend of Feynman’s recently. Quite a character! I wonder what this character thinks of the art the Hubble presents to all mankind.

    ” We do not come into this world, we come out of it. ” We are star stuff.

  2. A great discussion. I just wish that the word “spiritual” would have been (more) clearly defined. I gathered that Krauss meant “awe and wonder” as opposed to ” a higher state of conscience” or some Chopra-ism.

  3. Neo- you have inspired me by your disdain for his use of pompous to coin a new collective term for the religiously certain- they will henceforth be referred to as members of the “Hubristocracy”- though the Brits on board may quibble with the spelling, it has a nice ring or should I say “peal.”

  4. I love listening to Krauss, he has such a friendly demeanor combined with high intelligence and a way with words that makes it easy for dummies like me to grasp everything he’s talking about.

    The perfect ambassador for the “new” atheists as our western societies become less religious. Does he have an equal in the Islamic east?

  5. It was great to hear someone as knowledgeable and eloquent as Lawrence Krauss explaining clearly that God is irrelevant and the world would be better off without organized religion. Everything else he said was great too, especially his positive view of uncertainty as a driving-force in scientific endeavor. The interviewer did a reasonable job of striking a balance between questions the viewers of the television interview might be interested in and questions that would enable Prof. Krauss to express his own thoughts. There is an ingenuousness and friendliness about Prof. Krauss that make him an engaging ambassador for reason and science. We are lucky to have him.

    • In reply to #8 by Cairsley:

      It was great to hear someone as knowledgeable and eloquent as Lawrence Krauss explaining clearly that God is irrelevant and the world would be better off without organized religion. Everything else he said was great too, especially his positive view of uncertainty as a driving-force in scientific en…

      Steve Paikin is improving his knowledge of science by interviewing LK again like this. His first attempts at interviewing him a few years back at Waterloo University Perimeter Institute made him look clueless when he challenged scientific thinking.
      LK was at his best here and continues his education of Paikin … and us.

  6. It doesn’t matter what he says about the universe and how it works, if it’s not cognitive and common sense, then its just as mumbo-jumbo as any other religion where believing is required.

    • In reply to #9 by SGde3a:

      It doesn’t matter what he says about the universe and how it works, if it’s not cognitive and common sense, then its just as mumbo-jumbo as any other religion where believing is required.

      I’m not exactly sure to what you’re referring here. Are you implying that LK is talking jumbo-jumbo when he makes an educated assessment when talking about the origin of the universe?

    • In reply to #9 by SGde3a:

      It doesn’t matter what he says about the universe and how it works, if it’s not cognitive and common sense, then its just as mumbo-jumbo as any other religion where believing is required.

      Is Quantum Theory, the most successfully accurate Theory in all of Science, mumbo-jumbo then? It can’t possibly be common sense to anyone.

    • In reply to #9 by SGde3a:

      It doesn’t matter what he says about the universe and how it works, if it’s not cognitive and common sense, then its just as mumbo-jumbo as any other religion where believing is required.

      Unfortunately cognition is not all that common, especially in fields like quantum physics. However, the field produces results, so we are all forced to admit that some sort of cognition is taking place even if that sort of cognition is a bit beyond one’s own capabilities.

  7. SGde3a:

    It doesn’t matter what he says about the universe and how it works, if it’s not cognitive and common sense, then its just as mumbo-jumbo as any other religion where believing is required.

    But of course what LK says is not mumbo jumbo, but based upon a thorough understanding of the currently known laws of physics. No faith required.. As to the “other religion” jibe, in what way is science a religion? My friend, I think you have it exactly “back asswards” ! A lovely expression that could only be from the USA !

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