Long backlog for godless wedding services in Ireland

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Traditionally Catholic Ireland has allowed an atheist group to perform weddings this year for the first time, and the few people certified to celebrate them are overwhelmed by hundreds of couples seeking their services.


Demand for the Humanist Association of Ireland's secular weddings has surged as the moral authority of the once almighty Catholic Church collapsed in recent decades amid sex abuse scandals and Irish society's rapid secularization.

Until now, those who did not want a religious wedding could have only civil ceremonies. Outside of the registrar's office, only clergy were permitted to perform weddings.

But statistics show rising demand for non-Church weddings. In 1996, 90 percent of Irish weddings were performed by the Catholic Church or the Church of Ireland. But by 2010 that percentage had fallen to 69 percent.

Written By: Tom Heneghan
continue to source article at news.yahoo.com

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  1. I suppose the RCC will claim that these ceremonies are undermining the “true” meaning of marriage ! (Which is of course a property relation, before all else. )

    The Irish are seeing through Shady Brady and his gang !

    • In reply to #1 by Mr DArcy:

      I suppose the RCC will claim that these ceremonies are undermining the “true” meaning of marriage ! (Which is of course a property relation, before all else. )

      If you can’t sell your daughter for four cows and a goat you have already changed
      the definition of marriage.

      ~ Cecil Bothwell

      Marriage is primarily a legal contract, an agreement of mutual support, and a default way to split property on divorce.

      It is only peripherally about religion. There is an implied agreement about how to religiously indoctrinate children.

  2. Good to see the god-botherers’ monopoly being broken, in what was a RCC dominated country.
    Gatherings for celebrations of steps in life, should not require doses of mystical woo as preconditions.

  3. My cousin had a humanist wedding last year that was (I think) solemnised by someone from the Humanist Association of Ireland. It was great, all the readings and music were far more relevant than the usual church nonsense.
    Most of the couples I know who got married in the church “put up with” on the basis that it was tradition and it was expected by family.

    • In reply to #6 by max.tammbeck:

      When is England going to catch up with our neighbours in Scotland and Ireland, and legalise Humanist weddings?

      Why do we want humanist weddings? In Australia there have been civil marriage celebrants for best part of forty years. Usually retired civil servants or headmasters, it’s a good little earner for them (saves overtime for the civil service too). You can get married anywhere you want, whenever you want, and can write your own ceremony. 40-50% of Australian marriages are out of doors. The fees are not excessive, from memory the same as a registry office, but cheaper than a church. The system has never caused any problems.

      • In reply to #7 by Kevin Murrell:

        In reply to #6 by max.tammbeck:

        When is England going to catch up with our neighbours in Scotland and Ireland, and legalise Humanist weddings?

        Why do we want humanist weddings? In Australia there have been civil marriage celebrants for best part of forty years. Usually retired civil servants or…

        In the UK its been 130 years. But I’m with you. I think a state wedding register and a civil ceremony is a good thing. It is a contract in front of witnesses, thats the only bit that should be legal. Anything you want on top should be your own private business. I new a wiccan who had sex with his wife naked in a forest wearing a pair of anklers surrounded by a circle of chanting devotees. Thats one invite I’m glad i didn’t receive.

        • In reply to #8 by mr_DNA:

          In reply to #7 by Kevin Murrell:

          In reply to #6 by max.tammbeck:

          When is England going to catch up with our neighbours in Scotland and Ireland, and legalise Humanist weddings?

          Why do we want humanist weddings? In Australia there have been civil marriage celebrants for best part of forty years….

          I once officiated at a wiccan wedding in Australia. The girl next door asked me, though I was just as atheistic then. We had a civil celebrant just to make it legal. They explained that everyone should be naked, but as her granny and grandad, as well as her mammy were there, and moreover it was in the sunken gardens of the University, we skipped the nudity and bonking. Even her old grandparents, cockies from rural Tasmania, said that it was the best ceremony they had ever attended. I felt a bit of a fraud calling on Zeus, Afrodite etc, but I enjoyed a lot of the earth symbolism, them stepping over the broomstick and the handfasting, which seems to have crept into a lot of weddings lately, but which I had not seen before. Altogether a nice way to spend an afternoon.

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