Raising Kids Without God: Atheist Parents in Indonesia

0

The members of Indonesian Atheist Parents come together to answer a simple question: How do you survive as an atheist parent in a country where such a stance is considered blasphemous?


In a place where a hint of holding an unpopular opinion — about God, no less — can land a person in jail, or at the very least make someone a social outcast, it can often feel like raising a child to think differently is impossible for both child and parent.

For too many, the social and administrative challenges will be too much. Seemingly trivial tasks such as filling out forms, visiting family and chitchat around the table become a burden wrought with personal ramifications.

Simply put, is the effort worth the trouble?

The Indonesian Atheist Parents Facebook community was established in April. As an outgrowth of Indonesia’s increasingly vocal atheist movement — showcased most visibly by Karl Karnadi’s Indonesian Atheist group — the group’s specific focus has garnered it followers with a dedicated interest toward what its founders tags as “parenting beyond belief.”

Written By: Marcel Thee
continue to source article at thejakartaglobe.com

NO COMMENTS

  1. When I visited Indonesia, I got all sorts of questions, including “Why are you so fat?” “How many children do you have”. You can’t do business without having tea for 30 minutes first to get acquainted. If you have the time it is quite charming. However, nobody ever asked me about my religion. It might have been a taboo subject. It was obvious to me most of the people were Muslim, though quite relaxed about it.

    The way to handle it might be to find some Islamic saying that you are not supposed to brag about your religion.

  2. If such a saying exists in the Koran (or any other book of religion), it’s not observed a whole lot. For what is preaching but to brag that your religion is “THE way to god”. There’s nothing modest about that really.

    In any case, Indonesian atheists have to be commended for their daring and foresight. They could take the easy way out and leave their country to go to a place where freedom of expression is law. But they choose to stay and fight to help establish that freedom of expression in their own country instead.

    Many folks I know (friends, family) disagree with me but the more I learn about the world, the more I am convinced that distancing ourselves from religion and religious belief is absolutely essential for human and social progress. If we can’t achieve that, we’re doomed.

    • In reply to #2 by NearlyNakedApe:

      If such a saying exists in the Koran (or any other book of religion), it’s not observed a whole lot. For what is preaching but to brag that your religion is “THE way to god”. There’s nothing modest about that really.

      In any case, Indonesian atheists have to be commended for their daring and foresig…

      I can never understand why religions feel so threatened by those who don’t believe in their god or follow their religion that they feel the need to institute so many forms of punishment. Isn’t the whole thing about a god/religion/belief that caring/love/understanding is paramount?

      As far as I can see, atheists/non-believers have the upper hand when it comes all the attitudes that really matter in this life.

  3. The courage exhibited by these folk is truly inspiring. It certainly puts our fear in the UK of being labelled islamophobic in perspective. I hope that I could find that bravery, and I hope I never need to.

Leave a Reply