Sensitive riders want a safe place away from B.C. Ferries Wi-Fi

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While debate rages on over the effects of wireless technology on human health, those who claim a hypersensitivity to electromagnetism have called on B.C. Ferries to provide options to limit their exposure.


Louise Campbell of Nanoose Bay says her sensitivity to wireless devices can make a ferry ride to the Mainland a nightmare.

“For me, my day is thinking about how long I can spend in the mall, because there’s Wi-Fi in the mall. If I’m going to a friend’s house, I have to ask them to turn the Wi-Fi off,” she said.

Campbell claims her condition causes her to become lightheaded when exposed to wireless devices.

A two-hour trip into the city can leave her fatigued for the rest of the day. Campbell avoids restaurants, coffee shops, movie theatres and anywhere she expects exposure.

The situation impelled Campbell to call on B.C. Ferries to provide a way to limit exposure to the ship’s wireless technology while on voyages to the Mainland.

She is not the first to make the request, said B.C. Ferries spokeswoman Deborah Marshall. Marshall advised people like Campbell to reach out to the customer care department.

Written By: Ben Ingram
continue to source article at timescolonist.com

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      • In reply to #2 by Kim Probable:

        In reply to #1 by Timothy McNamara:

        Double blind tested? nope. Hand out the tin-foil hats.

        It has been. No effect from wifi was found.

        Should’ve said “supporting double blind test results?” (couldn’t find a proper study in my search) Good to know nonetheless.

  1. The same stupid debate is happening in our land locked town. This time in relation to cell towers close to a school. Tests were done by independent engineers and the results published, the largest source of radio waves was of course the local, and terrible, radio station and the cell tower was thousandths of the legal amount but did it make any difference – no. Hand out the tin foil hats.

    The worst part was they just wanted it further away, no specific distance, no recommendation, no idea just further. Cell service is excellent in town where do they think is dangerous, only at the school I guess.

  2. I want to scream at nitwits like this woman.

    WiFi is about 200 mw. It is so weak, it can only travel through a single building.
    Cell phones are about 1500 mw. They have to reach a cell phone tower which could be kms away.

    People put cellphones right next to their heads (unless they use bluetooth). If you sit next to someone chatting on a bus, the cell phone is only 30 cm from your head.

    Radiation obeys an inverse square law. Every doubling in distance reduces your exposure to 1/4. With WiFi you will probably never get any closer than 2 meters. just walking through. Distance is by far the most overpowering factor in determining exposure.

    Finally there is the duration of exposure. If you sit between two people on the bus chatting on cell phones, you get 2 hours of exposure on your ride. If you walk through the WiFi lounge you might get 15 seconds exposure.

    The total amount of power for WiFi could be provided by one AAA cell. Contrast this with 1500,000 milliwatts of 120 V act running through your kettle.

    My basic complaint is this women is a hypochondriac crank. She is gagging on a gnat and swallowing a camel. This same nuttiness applies to smart electric power meters. The bottom line is the net exposure from WiFi (or a smart meter) is microscopic compared with a cell phone. It is like worrying about getting wet from the dew during the Calgary flood.

    • In reply to #6 by Roedy:

      Your comment was right on the money.

      Knowing the very same facts I once installed a WiFi hub on my child’s window ledge – about 18″ from her head when she was sleeping. It was supposed to be a temporary thing but lasted a year. She suffered no ill effects, though it is difficult to get tops with two neck holes, don’t you find?

      I also, far more foolishly, once stuck my head into the trumpet of a failing, switched on, satellite uplink transmitter. Although this was Ku band rather than S band (used in microwave ovens) the effect, it seems to me, must have been pretty similar. I have survived unscathed for twenty years since that incident.

      The 1.5 seconds of exposure revealed the reason we were getting rain fade even on sunny days with blue skies (condensation in the transmission path).

      Before anyone asks; no I don’t put my head in microwave ovens as a party piece.

  3. There are places where the unwary can get fried by radio emissions, (which is why those in the navy are told to keep away from active radar dishes.)

    There is a certain irony of those on metro-trains dodging wi-fi while sitting on top of massive electric motors.

  4. I think the “light-headed” response holds a clue to the problem. Not a visible rash, or something able to be quantified, but a feeling of lightheadedness. There are a myriad other possible symptoms I can envisage happening to these super sensitive souls. I wonder if the subject would be open to the possibility of a controlled test on herself? It would be easy enough to set up….behind a screen, exposure to wifi or no wifi.

    • In reply to #8 by Nitya:

      I think the “light-headed” response holds a clue to the problem. Not a visible rash, or something able to be quantified, but a feeling of lightheadedness. There are a myriad other possible symptoms I can envisage happening to these super sensitive souls.

      Probably the vegan diet. I suggest a lot of raw steak. :)

  5. I’m not a fan of “head in device culture” but making up bullshit is still making up bullshit. My main problem is that too many people are clueless and thoughtless enough without their heads being buried in their iphone or whatever. Pay attention to where you are going! And please please please watch the road!

    • Captain Long John Silver: “Wattz up wi u Jim Ladz?”
      Jim Lad: “I’m feelinz a tad seasixz, captain, sir.”

      Captain Silver: “Nooooo it aintz Jim Lad”. “Yood be asufferinz fram that thar ‘Wee Fee feeling’!”
      JimLad: Wii wattsz, capin sir?”

      Captain Silver: “Aaargh, Jim boyo, oy got it oncez piratin BC ferree cargo in that icy Nanoose Bay” “Neerly got kot by a Royal BC navyeez frigate yoozin a strange ‘eelectricmagneetus’ Intarnetz canon thingee”.
      Jim Lad: “If themsz WiFi Royals ‘ad kot you they would ‘ave made you really light’eded, captain!”

      ;) m
      In reply to #11 by Jumped Up Chimpanzee:

      Louise Campbell of Nanoose Bay says her sensitivity to wireless devices can make a ferry ride to the Mainland a nightmare.

      Or maybe she just suffers from seasickness?

  6. Maybe she needs to recast her horoscope to help select more favourable dates for her extraordinary restaurant and coffee shop adventures. She might not have fully accounted for the subtle energy field impact of wi-fi transmissions disrupting planetary influences.

    The article also mention whether she has taken these obvious steps to mitigate the radiation:

    Wi-Fi blocking wallpaper

    EMF Healing Crystals

    I think she will find that a combined approach of revisionist astrology and conventional crystal therapy will be more effective than lobbying BC Ferries.

    Generally you find that people with chronically low energy and easily fatigued are taking an entire cocktail cabinet worth of naturopathic, homeopathic, and prescription pharmaceuticals. Each medication targeting the symptoms of the side effects of the others. Kind of like the woman who swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

    Plus there’s the lifetime nutritional history of someone that age. If they are in any way sensitive about their state of health then chances are very high that they followed generally accepted public health advice about nutrition. Or, even worse, may have caught a devastating memetic disease such as vegetarianism. There is a close link between vegetarianism, astrology, and sensitivity to subtle emanations from crystals. So she might be in luck there.

    This article is a good example of the prevailing assumption that anything less than perfect health needs an explanation, something or someone to blame. And presumably someone to sue for compensation.

    Ultimately the underlying problem might be the existence of lawyers, who are prone to paying attention to this kind of potentially lucrative phenomena. Maybe there needs to be a technology approach that can assist with diminishing the ubiquitous and malignant impact of lawyers. My suggestion is that scientists and engineers turn their attention to the problem of teaching maths and science in primary and secondary school. That seems to be where the root cause of the problem with lawyers begins. Many otherwise intelligent and talented children end up studying law for no other reason that it pays very much better than a real job, plus they don’t have to study terrifying and humiliating subjects like maths or physics etc.

  7. I don’t usually pay much attention to stories like this. Although I will say that decades ago when my parents first got Sky TV, both me and my mother went dizzy and light-headed the moment the engineer switched the box on. It was really odd and hasn’t happened since.

  8. How does she know it’s not the type of cloth on the ferry seats that she’s reacting to, or the aftershave of other passengers? Sounds like a case of placebo effect – she feels crappy after riding the ferry a couple of times (sea sickness anyone?) then looks for a cause and, based on her existing biases, blames the new Wi-Fi system. Now every time she sees a Wi-Fi sign she expects to feel unwell.

    • In reply to #20 by Martin_C:

      Also – prejudiced and generalised statement to follow, but – looks like a tarot reader/palmist.

      She reminds me, in a small way, of the woman -how do I describe this- partook of fasting, with just a bit of water, to cleanse herself so as to open to the truth of the universe. Her experiment failed, obviously.

      Anyway, I’m curious if there is a report describing the “average” wi-fi sensitive folk.

    • In reply to #23 by Agrajag:

      Lord help her if she ever needs an MRI!

      I had two CT scans a fortnight ago, following an accident doing tree surgery when I was clobbered by a log.

      They showed precisely what surgery was needed, and unsurprisingly, show no signs of doing me damage.

    • In reply to #24 by Sample:

      I only buy radiation that is natural and free range.

      Yes, well. It’s terrible when radiation is constrained in a one-dimensional box to the extent that it interferes with itself, IMO. Or is that electrons? Aren’t they kind of slow beta radiation? I dunno. I do try to avoid battery electrons. That said, I think Li-polymer battery electrons come from an organic source. It’s all a bit confusing. Then there’s the matter of fair trade. When it doesn’t happen, eventually there’ll be a storm brewing.

  9. In reply to … well most of the above.

    I feel that that this lady’s problem is worth investigating, for two reasons. First off, not all human beings are identical. please remember that only a few years ago we used to dismiss people who could “see” auras around others. Now we understand it is related to synaesthesia, Perhaps something in this lady’s head makes her sensitive to microwave transmissions, ( I am thinking the arrangement of metal fillings in her teeth, unique to her). Most of the dismissive studies mentioned above were done on ordinary people, That is like doing a double blind pregnancy testing on males.

    Secondly If there is even a possibility of human heads picking up microwave transmissions, that would open up the possibility of a form of telepathy or the ultimate in built in Wi-fi access.

    I know that last bit sound like utter science fiction, but scepticism works both ways. I am yet to be convinced that she is a crackpot.

  10. I need wi-fi boosters at home to get the signal through the fairly solid stone walls of my house, despite British Telecom claiming their unit will work up to 300 meters away. There people have been surrounded by far stronger RF signals since before they were born.

    If they want to live in a Faraday cage that’s their choice. Just don’t expect the rest of us to pay to have them installed in all pubs and restaurants etc.

    • In reply to #28 by Stevehill:

      I need wi-fi boosters at home to get the signal through the fairly solid stone walls of my house, despite British Telecom claiming their unit will work up to 300 meters away. …

      Or the problem could be BT’s claims (just kidding). I can’t even get a wireless router to work.

  11. Special treatment? WiFi free areas? Nah she can buy herself an Aaronia Shield head veil like the rest of us.

    They work brilliantly well except they appear to produce mild auditory side-effects. Wearers often report what they describe as a periodic and gentle fluttering sound (some have likened it to giggling) from somewhere behind their heads.

    • In reply to #31 by phil rimmer:

      Special treatment? WiFi free areas? Nah she can buy herself an Aaronia Shield head veil like the rest of us.

      “NB: the variations observed in TEST 1 were due to strong gusts of wind during the test, which goes to show that EMFs are influenced not only by the humidity present but also by strong winds.”

      Excuse me while I try to stop laughing.

  12. I have experienced lightheadedness too, though, as far as I know, it had nothing to do with electromagnetism and much to do with my not having had enough for breakfast. Of course, humans vary widely in their reactions to things, but, surely, the scientific evidence that has been produced about electronic devices should trump individuals’ assertions about their own experiences.

  13. In reply to #31 by phil rimmer:

    Special treatment? WiFi free areas? Nah she can buy herself an Aaronia Shield head veil like the rest of us.

    WTF is this. Some new kind of tinfoil hat? I gotta have one of these.

  14. I’m continually amazed at the utter lack of scientific understanding and sheer idiocy of my fellow humans.

    As someone else mentioned… Can you say seasickness… I knew that you could…

    This is as ridiculous as the people who claim those silly magnetic bracelets cured their arthritis. The magnet isn’t even strong enough to stick a single sheet of paper. The thickness of an average sheet of paper is .18 mm and the average thickness of the human skin is approx. .75 mm… about 4 times the thickness…
    This doesn’t even take into account the density of the underlying muscles and ligaments….

  15. Those suggesting that this woman protect herself with tinfoil are offering poor advice. by covering her head with tinfoil she is effectively turning herself into an antenna. A necklace of garlic is the most effective prevention against werewolves, vampires, Mormons and wifi.

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