Businessman Gary Bolton jailed over fake bomb detectors

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Video at the link below

A businessman who sold fake bomb detectors around the world has been jailed for seven years.


The devices made by Gary Bolton, 47, were simply boxes with handles and antennae, the Old Bailey heard.

The prosecution said he sold them for up to £10,000 each, claiming they could detect explosives. The trial heard the firm had a £3m annual turnover selling the homemade devices.

Bolton, of Redshank Road, Chatham, Kent, had denied two charges of fraud.

As he passed sentence, Judge Richard Hone QC described the equipment as "useless" and "dross" and said Bolton had damaged the reputation of British trade abroad.


continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

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  1. Part of me thinks that the people who believe in such quack deserve what they got, but the GT200 has led to arrests and imprisonment of innocent people because they were “detected” to be the culprits. Not to mention unaccounted death and destruction where the real culprits got away from security checkpoints using these fake detectors. Also the government officials who usually buys these stuff are probably corrupt and buy it overpriced using tax payers money so they can line their own pockets with the excess paid (Mexico spent 27 million USD according to wiki).

    Regardless of how unethical this scam is, i gotta say this Gary Bolton is rather smart (although he got caught)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GT200

  2. This is also a sad reflection on the customers and their lack of basic understanding of science. The people who ordered these things using tax payers money should also be disciplined or dismissed.

  3. From Wikipedia:

    The GT200 consists of three main components—a swivelling antenna mounted via a hinge to a plastic handgrip, into which “sensor cards” can be inserted.[7] It requires no battery or other power source and is said to be powered solely by the user’s static electricity. The device becomes active when the operator starts moving and detects various substances via “DIA/PARA magnetism”.

    Promotional material issued about the GT200 claims that it can detect a wide variety of items including ammunition, explosives, drugs, gold, ivory, currency, tobacco and “human bodies” at ranges of up to 700 metres (2,300 ft) on the surface, depths of up to 60 metres (200 ft) underground or under 800 metres (2,600 ft) of water, or even from aircraft at an altitude of up to 4 kilometres (2.5 mi).

    Anyone who is gullible to be fooled by these claims deserves to get their money extorted.

    • In reply to #4 by C.Wood:

      Anyone who is gullible to be fooled by these claims deserves to get their money extorted.

      Seriously? In your view, it’s ok to exploit the ignorant or gullible? That’s disappointing.

      Those who bought these because they weren’t educated enough to know they were fakes do not deserve to be ripped off.
      Those who deliberately bought them with tax payers’ money knowing they were fakes in order to reap some personal benefit should be done for fraud. Those who peddled these objects with false claims should be done for breach of advertising in relation to the severity of the fallout (innocents arrested, death caused by products clearly not fit for purpose).

      But saying the gullible deserve to be exploited? Poor show.

      • In reply to #5 by BenS:

        In reply to #4 by C.Wood:

        Anyone who is gullible to be fooled by these claims deserves to get their money extorted.

        Seriously? In your view, it’s ok to exploit the ignorant or gullible? That’s disappointing.

        Well, I was being sarcastic :P

        But then again, government officials, and supposedly “educated” people blindly trust amazing claims with no evidence? An amazing device that works with the user’s static energy, just for starters? Amazingly stupid and gullible.

        To this day I was absolutely sure homeopaths and similars should get banned, jailed, or something. But right now I’m confused. Einstein was right, there is no limit to human stupidity. How far should we go?

        Well, I’m definitely for the suing and banning of these types of things. Is it ok that I don’t feel much sorry for this story’s victims? I do feel sorry for homeopath’s “victims”, however…

        • In reply to #9 by C.Wood:

          But then again, government officials, and supposedly “educated” people blindly trust amazing claims with no evidence? An amazing device that works with the user’s static energy, just for starters? Amazingly stupid and gullible.

          No, they are just greedy, corrupt, bastards with no concern for anyone other than themselves (no change there then).

          The wrong person went to jail. Basic checks would’ve uncovered “…the equipment as “useless” and “dross”…”.

          Why arms procurement goes wrong

          For those that can’t be bothered reading the whole paper.

          Corruption:

          Both the international arms trade and domestic military procurement—in both
          the developed and developing world—are highly subject to corruption, as has
          been widely documented by Oxfam, Transparency International and others.
          All the weaknesses in procurement processes discussed above contribute to
          this. The lack of a clear link between defence policy and procurement makes it
          easy for corrupted politicians and officials to manipulate procurement
          processes. Poor transparency in budgeting or the existence of off-budget
          expenditure outside public scrutiny greatly facilitates the corrupt diversion of
          funds. Weak, non-transparent decision-making processes, the prevalence of
          sole-sourcing, and similar failings all create vulnerabilities. The failure or
          inability of the parliament, civil society, auditing institutions and anticorruption bodies to properly scrutinize the military sector makes it far easier
          for corruption to go undetected and unpunished. The veil of secrecy that can run all the way through military decision-making processes likewise provides
          cover for the corrupt. In exporter countries, favoured arms companies may
          enjoy relative immunity (*see e.g. case study 12, the UK).

          Case study 12. The UK’s cancelled investigation into BAE Systems

          BAE Systems is alleged to have
          paid a Saudi prince £1 billion in
          ‘commissions’ relating to the
          ‘Al Yamamah’ arms deal; the
          British Government was
          criticized by the OECD for
          shutting down a corruption
          investigation into the deal in
          2006

          Procurement contract backhanders in the UK are nothing new…particularly when it comes to military or security equipment.

          Suppliers of everything from nails to armour plate, shirts to fighter jets, tanks to rifles…there is always a chubby brown envelope being past to some fecker who thinks his life isn’t at risk so why should he give a feck. Here’s just a couple of the more infamous examples that cost a bloody fortune…

          British Military Procurement Mysteries

          It has always been this way. Anyone having had the unenviable privilege of wearing a Shirt KF or “Shirt Hairy” as it was commonly called, will know what I’m talking about. Here is how one ex-serviceman blogger describes it…

          “Shirt, Mans, Combat” – or “Shirt, Mans, Itchy/sandpaper/unbearable, etc”…….whether khaki or green, the old hairy wool/nylon flannel KF shirt was just plain awful….especially in summer…..I remember putting my new ones in a bucket of 75/25 bleach and water in an attempt to burn away the hairyness……..

          The bastard that got the backhander for that tender has been decried by every squaddie that ever wore a Shirt Unbearable KF. Just one example among many fine examples of procurement underhandedness.

          So the question remains, why was Gary Bolton jailed over fake bomb detectors while all sorts of snake oil salesmen run about the country selling all sorts of fake products that don’t work? One rule for one, a different rule for another. Ya know what I mean? Wink, wink, say no more.};0)~

          • In reply to #12 by Ignorant Amos:

            In reply to #9 by C.Wood:

            But then again, government officials, and supposedly “educated” people blindly trust amazing claims with no evidence? An amazing device that works with the user’s static energy, just for starters? Amazingly stupid and gullible.

            No, they are just greedy, corrupt, bastards…

            Agreed, the shirt was terrible, but did you ever wear battledress? That was the one with the blouse which went to the waist only, and the webbing belt went over it. It was absolutely awful, made from the coarsest wool, and god knows what else, plus the fact that you could never stop it riding up your belly, making a midriff gap, which prefigured today’s fashions for bright young things.

          • In reply to #15 by Kevin Murrell:

            BD was before my time as standard issue. I did try it on though, and used 37 pattern webbing through basic training…a lot of crap.

          • In reply to #12 by Ignorant Amos:

            The wrong person went to jail. Basic checks would’ve uncovered “…the equipment as “useless” and “dross”…”.

            I would be amazed if none of the users had thought to test their equipment on their own munitions, and then failed to complain to their superiors when no alarm warning was given by the equipment!

            A cynic might suggest that the useless fraudsters, rogues and incompetents, should be put on mine clearing duties using their own dud equipment!

          • In reply to #17 by Alan4discussion:

            I would be amazed if none of the users had thought to test their equipment on their own munitions, and then failed to complain to their superiors when no alarm warning was given by the equipment!

            The whole story flabbergasts me I can tell you. As an ex-Royal Engineer Search Team Commander who has extensive experience in the training of personnel in the use of search equipment, including explosive detection equipment, I just can’t get my head around the fact that this “gear” got out into the field. All military equipment goes through trials before entered into service. Even the crap shit that should be rejected but gets passed because of the corruption, has to work to a certain degree.

            A cynic might suggest that the useless fraudsters, rogues and incompetents, should be put on mine clearing duties using their own dud equipment!

            That’s the point, the piece of kit in question is not a mine detector, so a false negative wouldn’t make a difference…the users were also never going to get a false positive…box didn’t work…it never worked….how did it get past muster?

            Bolton was a schister to be sure, but others bare a greater responsibility in this case…where are they?

          • In reply to #19 by Ignorant Amos:

            Bolton was a schister to be sure, but others bare a greater responsibility in this case…where are they?

            I agree. There is something amazingly wrong with a system that allows this to happen, the guy is the worst kind of con man but if other people aren’t held accountable, if the system isn’t fixed, it could happen again..

  4. What I don’t understand is how this fraud managed to operate for so long. James Randi was calling this guy out years ago. The claims made of the device itself defied all common sense and obviously put lives at risk. I just hope when he’s done his sentence here, that there are a queue of other countries lined up ready to extradite him.

  5. When preachers to psychics continue to rake in huge sums of money for essentially selling nothings, is it any surprise someone saw another huge potential for fleecing the public by taking advantage of their fears?

    This is a good step, but not near a big enough one. All salesmen should be forced to prove the effectiveness of their product before being allowed to label it as effective. The religious and alternative medicine industry should not continue to be exempt from this.

  6. Jurors found Bolton guilty of a charge of making an article for use in the course of fraud and one of supplying an article for use in the course of fraud, between January 2007 and July last year.

    So when can we expect to see the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Pope, Sally Morgan or Sara Eames , to name but a few, in the dock on charges of selling fakery to the gullible, or ignorant, or corrupt?

    In a separate case, McCormick, 57, of Langport, Somerset, was jailed for 10 years in May for selling more than 7,000 fake detectors.

    That is just plain ridiculous…10 years? 10 feckin’ years? WTF?

    In other news….”Disgraced priest Michael Hill was jailed for five years today for a series of sex attacks on boys.”

    And they say Lady Justice is blind…no shit Sherlock!!!!

  7. So Gary Bolton got sent down for 7 years for selling people an empty electrical box with no functioning parts that was supposed to detect things?
    Something with less functioning parts than a Fisher-price playcentre?
    I guess they could always be recycled as e-meters… anyone for a free personality test?

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