Chiropractors pushing anti-vaccination line face crackdown, audits

0

Chiropractors will be forced to stop making anti-vaccination and other misleading claims in a crackdown on shonky operators from the profession's governing board.


Earlier this year Fairfax revealed chiropractors were receiving government-mandated training by anti-vaccination clinicians who believe diet and ''keeping the spine in line'' will prevent deadly diseases such as polio.

On Thursday the chairman of the Chiropractic Board of Australia said it had removed some courses from its approved training schedule and would be randomly auditing practitioners to ensure they were not making unsubstantiated claims about the benefits of chiropractic.

It also announced all registered chiropractors would be required to remove anti-vaccination claims from their websites.

''We will not tolerate registered chiropractors giving misleading or unbalanced advice to patients, or providing advice or care that is not in the patient's best interests,'' chairman Phillip Donato said.
 

Written By: Amy Corderoy
continue to source article at smh.com.au

NO COMMENTS

  1. If chiropractors were to be dismissed for making unsubstantiated scientific claims, there would be no chiropractors left in the world.

    They are charlatans and their claims about pretty well everything are bogus.

    I am allowed to say that since they were comprehensively defeated in their UK libel action against science journalist Simon Singh, who said the same thing in a Guardian article which caused the fuss.

    The idea of chiropractors having a regulatory body is both amusing and oxymoronic.

    • In reply to #1 by Stevehill:
      The idea of chiropractors having a regulatory body is both amusing and oxymoronic.

      Most systems of belief have regulatory bodies, it is characteristical for most of religions. Since ciropractic is purely based on beliefs that are false, without a regulatory body, how would they know what to believe? In a way this regulatory body has made an error by removing these courses since ciropractic clearly teaches that 95% of all diseases can be cured by manipulating imaginary subluxations of the spine and the rest 5% of diseases can be cured by manipulating imaginary subluxations of other joints. Before we know it, the church will remove courses from priests where they teach exorcism and blessing of water and where would be the fun in that?

  2. Even their bone manipulaton is open to question. Manipulation without a preceeding deep massage is violent and jarring. I used a Chinese masseur for a dodgy back, you got a hallf hour massage first, then you didn’t even feel the manipulation and the spine being realigned. It worked every time and gave permanent relief, until I did something stupid and put it out again. He made no bogus claims, and had no time at all for chiropractors.

    • In reply to #2 by Kevin Murrell:

      Even their bone manipulaton is open to question. Manipulation without a preceeding deep massage is violent and jarring. I used a Chinese masseur for a dodgy back, you got a hallf hour massage first, then you didn’t even feel the manipulation and the spine being realigned. It worked every time and…

      Oh dear, Kevin, why did you stop your skepticism at “bone manipulation?” You didn’t, don’t, feel the manipulation because your spine is not being realigned. Just look at a chicken neck, or turkey neck, the next time one is being cooked – and examine the bone structures that keep the spine “aligned.” You have to break them off to twist the spine. The same thing holds in humans, in spite of the lucrative “snake-oil” pitches of the various salesmen.

      • In reply to #9 by machetegigante:

        In reply to #2 by Kevin Murrell:

        Spine realigned?

        what? if your spine gets out of line you die. Bones do not need alignment, and if they do, yo need surgery.

        Kevin was correct that spinal manipulation can reposition displaced vertebrae or manipulate damaged disks, to relieve painful pressure on nerves or help recover from strains.

        This is of course a regular medical treatment by physiotherapy which may have also been adopted by Chiropractors!

  3. WAIT just a minute. Chiropractors have their place. In the case of a whiplash victim, a good chiropractor can return the victim to normal within half a year. Without chiropractic manipulation it may take up to six months.

  4. ”We will not tolerate registered chiropractors giving misleading or unbalanced advice to patients, or providing advice or care that is not in the patient’s best interests,” – So they will not tolerate chiropractors?

  5. ”We will not tolerate registered chiropractors giving misleading or unbalanced advice to patients, or providing advice or care that is not in the patient’s best interests,” chairman Phillip Donato said.
    So…Why do they allow them at all? I’m just sayin’…

  6. This is just parenthetical: Some years ago I heard a talk by a speaker from the American Medical Association on the general subject of quackery, and of course chiropractic was prominently discussed. I raised my hand and asked the speaker if chiropractors really believed in what they were doing and saying. He thought for a moment and said that his rough estimate was that about 10% of them actually believed they were doing the patient good.

  7. In reply to #5 by DStowens:

    In reply to #2 by Kevin Murrell:

    Even their bone manipulaton is open to question. Manipulation without a preceeding deep massage is violent and jarring. I used a Chinese masseur for a dodgy back, you got a hallf hour massage first, then you didn’t even feel the manipulation and the spine being re…

    Don’t know what he did – I only know that it worked, and worked well. I’m probably guilty of a little hyperbole, since you could feel something moving, what I really meant, was that it didn’t hurt. I’m not easily conned, but I got long term pain relief several times from his treatment.

    Thanks to Alan for coming to my rescue.

  8. Of the Chiropractic, the worst offenders are those who practice “kenisiology”, which is akin to homeopaty in it’s implementation (touch a food product and then press muscle groups to see if you react. This will vary from session to session, causing the patient to keep returning while he or she has to keep being realigned to cure that “weakness”. How those who specialize in that can hang out their shingle is beyond me.

Leave a Reply