Saudi activist gets seven years jail and 600 lashes

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A Saudi court sentenced on Monday a rights activist to seven years in jail and 600 lashes for setting up a “liberal” network and alleged insults to Islam, activists said.


“Raef Badawi has been sentenced to seven years in jail and 600 lashes,” lawyer Waleed Abualkhair wrote on his Twitter account, adding that the judge ordered the closure of the website of the Saudi Liberal Network.

He said Badawi, a co-founder of the Saudi Liberal Network, was charged with criticising the religious police, as well as calling for “religious liberalisation”.

A judge had referred Badawi in December to a higher court for alleged apostasy, a charge that could lead to the death penalty in the ultra-conservative kingdom.

The judge said at the time that his lower court was not qualified to deal with the case.

But the charge of apostasy was dropped on Monday, activists said.

 

Written By: AFP
continue to source article at gulfnews.com

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  1. 600 lashes.

    Assuming that ten lashes is about all one should be given at one time, ( a fair assumption with some empirical support ) if punishment and not death is your aim, then in that seven years this person will be lashed sixty times.

    Utter barbarism!

  2. In unrelated issues, at the very same time, the Polo family was spotted crossing the border into Cathay, to visit the Emperor Kublai Khan; the Black Death has been plaguing much of Europe; the Incas are building some cool cities and of course, our friends the Saudis are much concerned with apostasy and the likely ending of the 13th century.

    • In reply to #4 by RDfan:

      So are we to take it that a country can commit crimes against humanity and deliver cruel and unusual treatment to its convicts so long as there is a religio-cultural raison d’etre?

      So long as the country is flush with copious amounts of oil, apparently so.

      I myself look forward to the day when the last drop of crude is extracted from under the Saudis’ feet and they must resort to cornering the egg-timer market.

  3. The network that he co-founded with female rights activist Suad Al Shammari, had announced on May 7, 2012 a “day of liberalism” in the Muslim kingdom, calling for an end to the influence of religion on public life in Saudi Arabia.
    >
    He knew that kind of talk wouldn’t go down very well in this lunatic epistemological time capsule. He’s a brave man but gives the impression of being a bit like a one man version of the ‘Charge of the Light Brigade’.

    Saudi Arabia’s version of Sharia, Islamic law, stipulates death as a punishment for apostasy, but defendants are usually given the chance to repent and escape being beheaded.
    >
    Their version appears to be much like all the other versions, in which case they will manage to kill him in around 30 mins unless the lashes are to be given with a small feather duster.

  4. It sounds like the “augment from authority” of the pig ignorant who are too incompetent and deluded to make a convincing case for their views. It does in some way reflect the US right wing! The collection of half-wits do not add up to the thinking power of a whole brain, but they have military weapons to impose their views – so who needs intelligence?

    • In reply to #10 by aldous:

      This case underlines why irreverence towards religion is the correct attitude. Those of us who are free to do so would be remiss not to take the opportunity to blaspheme when it arises.

      Irreverence towards and blaspheming religion is low hanging fruit.

      The fruit kept out of reach by cultural relativist accomodationists everywhere, including many commenters here, and all the more poisonous are the hand-wringing, apologist, let’s not paint the “moderates™” with the same brush as the “fundamentalists™”, mullticulti, I’m atheist but, sanctimonious sanctioners or purveyors of belief in belief such as the politicians and public “intellectuals” who, for example, enabled the creeping islamization of the former cradle of the enlightenment, Europe bastion of secular humanism. And, who fail completely to register any protest on, for example, this latest outrage in Saudi Arabia. Or can anyone point me to as much as a statement by any government or politician to that effect?

      If religion deserves to be blasphemed these spine and mindless in-house saboteurs who give it cover deserve constant outing and ridicule.

      • In reply to #15 by godsbuster:

        let’s not paint the “moderates™” with the same brush as the “fundamentalists™”,

        You’ve completely misunderstood the point that was being made. It was exactly the reverse of what you are saying. The supernatural tenets of religious creeds are equally piffle whether professed by moderates or fundamentalists. Therefore, on this point, the right attitude is precisely ‘painting moderates and fundamentalists with the same brush’.

        In the case of violations of human rights, such as the case in this thread, opposition to cruel and unjustified punishment comes from a concern for human rights whether the perpetrators are religious or not.

        • In reply to #16 by aldous:

          In reply to #15 by godsbuster:

          let’s not paint the “moderates™” with the same brush as the “fundamentalists™”,

          You’ve completely misunderstood the point that was being made. It was exactly the reverse of what you are saying. The supernatural tenets of religious creeds are equally piffle whether professed by moderates or fundamentalists. Therefore, on this point, the right attitude is precisely ‘painting moderates and fundamentalists with the same brush’.
          In the case of violations of human rights, such as the case in this thread, opposition to cruel and unjustified punishment comes from a concern for human rights whether the perpetrators are religious or not.

          The point that is not even being misunderstood because it is being entirely ignored and is the main point being made is that those who Richard Dawkins calls “quislings” or, if you will, apatheists, the cultural relativist accomodationists in our midst, should be coming in for no less grief than that what we here on these pages so generously heap on religion.

          The violation of human rights in the above case is religion driven implemented by the religious. Again, where is the outrage from our politically correct political classes who so wish not to offend (the hand on the oil spigot)? And who enable this state of affairs: Teachers ‘denied schoolboy, 10, water on the hottest day of the year to avoid upsetting Muslim pupils during Ramadan’

          • In reply to #19 by godsbuster:

            You’re quite right that the article in the Gulf News is about a so-called crime against religion. Making blasphemy a crime is the first line of defence of religious nonsense against rational opposition. That’s why we should be irreverent towards religion, even when professed by moderates.

            even mild and moderate religion helps to provide the climate of faith in which extremism naturally flourishes. R. Dawkins: The God Delusion

  5. I cannot think of anything so cruel as 600 lashes and seven years in prison Islam is in the Middle ages when the welfare of Prisoners are concerned. I just wish our Government and Europe would comment on this issue rather then take the oil and do nothing. I guess they do not want to upset the Arabs in case they sulk and not play the trading game.

  6. If one has facts and a logical argument, there’s no need for faith and force in the discussion. Evidently, jail and executions have always been great aids to piety and are so now in places where Islam is in power. Faith is a vice.

  7. It seems when it comes to Saudi Arabia this country enjoys a wide carte blanche as far as their atrocities are concerned. The press doesn’t say much about Saudi Arabia’s sado-masochistic “cultural” habits, in comparison with other atrocities in other countries, specially in unfriendly poorer countries. I suppose the press is afraid that their advertising account might suffer if the multinationals that do business in the Gulf stopped advertising in the newspapers.
    Money and friendship allow for many things.

    • In reply to #18 by Odalrich:

      It seems when it comes to Saudi Arabia this country enjoys a wide carte blanche as far as their atrocities are concerned. The press doesn’t say much about Saudi Arabia’s sado-masochistic “cultural” habits, in comparison with other atrocities in other countries, specially in unfriendly poorer countri…

      Actually, the story you’ve just read was published in Gulf News which has its base in Dubai. I don’t think you can say the press ‘doesn’t say much’ about violations of human rights in Saudi Arabia.

      • In reply to #20 by aldous:

        In reply to #18 by Odalrich:

        It seems when it comes to Saudi Arabia this country enjoys a wide carte blanche as far as their atrocities are concerned. The press doesn’t say much about Saudi Arabia’s sado-masochistic “cultural” habits, in comparison with other atrocities in other countries, speciall..

        I suppose Dubai must have huge quantities of oil and doesn’t need to flatter Saudi Arabia..

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