This Astronomer Recreated Starry Night with Hubble Space Photos

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Starry Night, possibly Van Gogh’s most famous painting, seems to be a favorite of astrophysicists. They’ve named an astronomy software system after it. They’ve named star watching events after it.


And last year, astrophysicist Alex Parker recreated the famous painting out of Hubble Telescope images. Click here to see the full size version.

Parker’s not the only one to figure out that these photos are amazing building blocks for art: the artist Sergio Albiac has created a series of portraits using just 50 hand-selected images from Hubble’s vast oeuvre. Parker chose to use the top 100 images from the Hubble Space telescope to create his rendition of Starry Night. You can download all 100 for free here, if you want to try to make your own mosaic out of space.

Written By: Rose Eveleth
continue to source article at blogs.smithsonianmag.com

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    • In reply to #8 by NearlyNakedApe:

      In reply to #2 by Katy Cordeth:

      .

      Wow! You got 7 likes from 4 users and 3 guests for posting a period. Now THAT’s what I call popularity ;-D

      Just like with stars, there’s more to that blue dot than meets the eye…. 8-)

      • In reply to #9 by CdnMacAtheist:

        Just like with stars, there’s more to that blue dot than meets the eye…

        I think it’s the most beautiful song ever, about possibly the most beautiful human ever.

        I can’t listen to it without crying.

        I get to the bit that goes

        Swirling clouds in violet haze / Reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue

        and it just destroys me.

      • In reply to #9 by CdnMacAtheist:

        In reply to #8 by NearlyNakedApe:

        In reply to #2 by Katy Cordeth:

        .

        Wow! You got 7 likes from 4 users and 3 guests for posting a period. Now THAT’s what I call popularity ;-D

        Just like with stars, there’s more to that blue dot than meets the eye…. 8-)

        Thanks for the heads-up. A very beautiful and moving song indeed. It reminds me of the time when I was a kid. My older sister used to play it on the family record player in the den. I have to admit I didn’t really appreciate it back then so this feels like re-discovering something I forgot a long time ago and didn’t pay proper attention to at the time.

  1. In reply to #10 by Katy Cordeth:

    I think it’s the most beautiful song ever, about possibly the most beautiful human ever.

    I can’t listen to it without crying.

    I get to the bit that goes

    Swirling clouds in violet haze / Reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue

    and it just destroys me.

    If that’s the case, then I definitely recommend AGAINST listening to “Der Abschied” (The Farewell), the last movement of Gustav Mahler’s “Das Lied Von Der Erde” (The Song Of The Earth) sung by Krista Ludwig (The Otto Klemperer version). There’s no coming back from that one. This piece is both a masterpiece and a haunting dichotomy. The highest summit of musical lyricism and the deepest abyss of despair all rolled into one. Listener beware!

    ;-)

    • In reply to #12 by NearlyNakedApe:

      In reply to #10 by Katy Cordeth:

      I think it’s the most beautiful song ever, about possibly the most beautiful human ever.

      I can’t listen to it without crying.

      I get to the bit that goes

      Swirling clouds in violet haze / Reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue

      and it just destroys me.

      If that’s…

      Mahler is awesome. I prefer the orchestral music (I used to play the french horn, few people write better music for horns) but I like everything he composed. He was also a victim of religious discrimination, its odd, there were plenty of Jewish musicians at the time but for a jew to be the lead conductor of the opera, I’m sure there is some fancy name for the position he had, was unusual and he received a lot of attacks as a result.

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