Saudi Arabia cabinet passes ban on domestic violence

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Saudi Arabia's cabinet has passed a ban on domestic violence and other forms of abuse against women for the first time in the Kingdom's history.


The cabinet approved the ban on physical or sexual violence earlier this week, which applies both at home or within the work place.

The legislation makes domestic violence a punishable crime for the first time. It also provides treatment and shelter for victims of abuse and holds law enforcement agencies accountable for investigating and prosecuting allegations of abuse.

The ban includes penalties of a maximum12 month jail sentence and fines of up to $13,000.

 “All civilian or military employees and all workers in the private sector who learn of a case of abuse — by virtue of their work — shall report the case to their employers when they know it,” Alnbawaba reported the cabinet as saying in a statement. “The employers shall report the case to the Ministry of Social Affairs or police when they know it.”

A campaign calling for an end to violence against women was run for the first time earlier in the year, using an image of a woman wearing a hijab with her eyes visible through slits in the veil.

Written By: Heather Saul
continue to source article at independent.co.uk

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  1. This sounds like a very positive move on the face of it. The details would make interesting reading.

    Would it be too boorish to enquire how many witnesses the plaintiff will need to provide to the violent act/s?

    • In reply to #2 by Vorlund:

      This sounds like a very positive move on the face of it. The details would make interesting reading.

      Would it be too boorish to enquire how many witnesses the plaintiff will need to provide to the violent act/s?

      Not only would it be boorish it would be “racist” as per the left-of-the-centre British media.

      Sadly this law will have scant impact on the physical and sexual abuse suffered by female domestic servants in Saudi Arabia most of which are from Indonesia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and increasingly Ethiopia. Many of them live in a state of de facto slavery or at least indentured servitude.

  2. Is it yet an act or just a bill, if that’s how things work in that neck o’ the woods?

    The make up isn’t any good; her eye should have been made so swollen that it’s shut or just a slit. That’s a black eye almost recovered.

    It always strikes me as strange that since our eyes are the windows onto our emotions that the trick is missed by covering up everything except the eyes in the belief that it will “protect” woman from attention, when in fact it draws attention to them; that woman for instance has the most beautiful eyes!

    Ah well, I suppose it’s what the prophet prescribed and therefore must be obeyed.

    • In reply to #5 by Light Wave:

      At last – a protection for Saudi women… hope Arabia can influence others around the middle east to change their laws to protect women

      Not too many left to influence for the progressive Saudis:

      Women were granted the right to vote on a universal and equal basis in Lebanon in 1952,[47] Syria (to vote) in 1949 [48] (Restrictions or conditions lifted) in 1953,[49] Egypt in 1956,[50] Tunisia in 1959,[51] Mauritania in 1961,[52] Algeria in 1962,[53] Morocco in 1963,[54] Libya [55] and Sudan in 1964,[56] Yemen (Partly)in 1967 [48] (full right) in 1970,[57] Bahrain in 1973,[58] Jordan in 1974,[59] Iraq (Full right) 1980 [58] Oman (Partly) in 1994 and (Fully granted) 2003,[60] and Kuwait in 2005.[58] Saudi Arabia announced that it would give women the right to vote in 2015.[61].
      (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_in_Arab_societies#Women.27s_right_to_vote_in_the_Arab_world)

      • In reply to #7 by GOD:

        In reply to #5 by Light Wave:

        At last – a protection for Saudi women… hope Arabia can influence others around the middle east to change their laws to protect women

        Not too many left to influence for the progressive Saudis:

        Women were granted the right to vote on a universal and equal basis in L…

        The right to vote for women was Not what I commented on – although other Muslim countries are far more progressive than Arabia when it comes to voting rights and other women’s rights – thanks for all those dates….It was Protection from domestic violence that I particularly applaud, Any step forward for women in that regard anywhere in the world is long overdue…and Arabia are notoriously strict on women and not so progressive…So I applaud the fact that they’ve shifted their unmovable position….at last….if its a token gesture why would they publicly make it a law ? either way as long as this eases the suffering of women…that’s the main issue…

  3. Why would they do this? I gather it is because of the grinding pressure. They just did not like the black eye on Islam. It is another matter to change the behaviour, but am amazed Saudi authorities would change so drastically overnight. Good on ‘em.

    • In reply to #8 by Roedy:

      Why would they do this? I gather it is because of the grinding pressure. They just did not like the black eye on Islam. It is another matter to change the behaviour, but am amazed Saudi authorities would change so drastically overnight. Good on ‘em.

      It’s a slap in the face too for all those who dismiss the Arab Spring and call it a wasted effort.

  4. A step in the right direction. I just hope it catches on and doesn’t just become another piece of tokenism to point to when the more barbaric laws are broken.
    No matter though, I would still expect this law – if it ever passes, will be subservient to Sharia. jcw

  5. The left of centre British media has no particular wisdom in anything nor for that matter does the right of centre. They peddle their penny dreadfuls for profit, truth would only get in the way.

  6. If this becomes law, then there will have to be a clear definition of ‘violence’.

    Depending on what falls in or outside this definition we shall see how worthwhile this measure turns out to be.

    eg; Koran 4:34 Is variously translated as the husband should, as a last sanction: ‘beat her’ or ‘scourge her’.

    Apologist Imams in the west have explained that the typical implement that should be used in such a case is a toothpick!

  7. Saudi Arabia’s cabinet has passed a ban on domestic violence and other forms of abuse against women for the first time in the Kingdom’s history.

    There’s progress if it actually happens!

    Now! What about Saudi judicial violence?

    Judicial corporal punishment by flogging – http://www.corpun.com/counsaj.htm
    >

    Local courts routinely order floggings, often of hundreds of lashes — or even thousands, inflicted in instalments. Women as well as men may be flogged. Some sources suggest that hundreds of these flogging sentences are imposed every week, mostly without press publicity.

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