God told me to, say 38% of Americans

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38% of Americans say that they have done something because God told them to, while more than half of people who believe in God say that the deity sometimes controls weather and disasters.

New research from YouGov suggests that many Americans believe God plays an active role in their lives. 

Out of the 76% of Americans who said that they personally believe in the existence of a God, half say that they have at least once before done something because God told them to. Including non-believers, this makes up 38% of the entire country. 

The group most likely to have acted on God's command are 'born-again' or evangelical Christians, who make up about a third of Americans. Almost two-thirds (65%) of born-again Christians say God has told them to do something at least once before. Only a quarter (25%) of the remaining population have ever had the same experience.

Written By: Peter Moore
continue to source article at today.yougov.com

58 COMMENTS

    • In reply to #1 by Neodarwinian:

      Bad news here.

      Reading the bible makes one shudder at what god has told people to do and 38% of Americans think that they have done just that.

      His best documented commands all involved murder and genocide. Consider Abraham. I am revolted this mentally ill man is still revered.

  1. This is a preposterous delusion. The creator of the universe took time to tell you which used car to buy. Stupid people love this delusion because it makes them feel important. Think of all the things a voice in your head could be. Christians presume God without any evidence.

    And the Father himself, which hath sent me, hath borne witness of me. Ye have neither heard his voice at any time, nor seen his shape.
    ~ John 5:37

  2. Including non-believers, this makes up 38% of the entire country.

    Why would you want to include non-believers in data about American believers and how they positively acted on God’s commands?

    Anywho, what’s surprising is that only 38 percent of them actually acted at least once on God’s command — I would have thought it to be 100 percent.

    Are the rest of them not hearing God’s commands, or are they acting regardless of what God tells them to do? If it’s the former, that would be ironic; if the latter, it would beg the question: on what basis do they act, if they’ve never acted on God’s commands?

    • In reply to #7 by ShadowMind:

      Some-one remind me: why is religion not considered a mental illness?

      Because some of the religious are involved in running the asylum. None of them think they’re deluded. They think it’s a profound philosophical question.

    • In reply to #7 by ShadowMind:

      Some-one remind me: why is religion not considered a mental illness?

      It’s been said before, but you must have forgotten: if only one person claimed that he believes in a Zombie Jew who lived 2000 years ago and walked on water, raised the dead, and healed the sick, we would say he has a mental illness. If millions of people say they believe the same thing, we call it a religion and give its proponents a tax break.

    • In reply to #12 by Stevehill:

      Bush invaded Iraq because god told him to.

      If he had said that a pixie told him to invade Iraq people would have said he had mental health issues. But because he said God told him, apparently most Americans don’t question that. BTW, it’s a pity God did not tell him there were no weapons of mass destruction in Iraq (which is another reason he gave for the invasion).

  3. In reply to #10 by Tahoe Blue:

    How do they know the difference between god and their inner voice?

    How do they know the difference between God and Satan, since the latter is supposedly quite a convincing deceiver?

  4. The group most likely to have acted on God’s command are ‘born-again’ or evangelical Christians, who make up about a third of Americans.

    “Born Again”, seems to be a metaphor for “Restarted life with brain impairment”!

  5. Long ago, when I was a Catholic, it was not considered proper to receive intelligible messages from God nor to do something because one believed God had told one to do it; that sort of thing was for those gross Protestant bible-thumpers. However, one was encouraged to be sensitive to the “promptings of the Holy Spirit”, which might over time even indicate the rightness of a certain course of action. One was encouraged to submit such promptings to a spiritual mentor (usually a priest, but not always) and not to rely solely on one’s own judgement in such matters. I have found, since my apostasy, that such promptings are actually quite natural experiences, in which there was no need to implicate a holy spirit. Such experiences I now refer to usually as hunches, and I have from time to time, like many other people I know, done something on a hunch.

  6. I have become convinced that the demise of the human species is inevitable and will be because of it’s capacity for self delusion. The mind is an incredible organ, but in humans it plays tricks upon itself by seeing patterns which aren’t there, and then convincing itself it’s proof of a supernatural being that is aware of us. Emotionally, we never really mature out of infancy and need those reassuring feelings we get from parents. Only those aware of those needs as being the residue of our total helplessness as children have a chance to free themselves from this infantile regression.

  7. Coming from young children this would be understandable, but how can you reason with this nonsense when it comes from adults?

    I hear a voice telling me whether or not to do things; it’s mine!

    If I thought otherwise I’d probably be a tad psychotic.

  8. Reading some of the above comments, I’m forced to ponder what the commentators would do with “Born-again” Christians if in government etc. And, before you all leap on injustices that has been wrought by religious organisations, these cannot be denied: but think, too, about the good that many people are driven to do because of their Christian faith. Atheists tend to forget about the good aspects of faith because it does not suit their cause.

    As for the question of why religion is not considered a mental illness: it seems unreasonable and irrational that you would so easily write off (or lock up) millions of people for simply believing something that you don’t believe. The audacity of such a presumption is staggering. The people you would dismiss as mentally ill would include doctors, scientists, teachers; indeed, people from all walks of live who, because of their faith in a loving God have sought to be good to their neighbors or have started humanitarian projects for the good of others. Hardly deserving of being locked up in an asylum, wouldn’t you say?.

    I also detect a derogatory tone in the comment about religion being a mental illness, rather than one of care and concern. This is also unwarranted. If you really think it’s an illness, why not speak with compassion, like you would when talking about cancer etc?

    Now, on the matter of the subject itself, it may well be that people have done things because they believed God told them to. Humor me for a moment, but suppose God does exist; some of those people may be right and others may be wrong. What the commentators on this site generally do (which is unfair) is to pick out all the bits of the Bible they dislike and fire that as an accusation against Christians, and thereby, justify to themselves a discounting of God’s existence. That, as I said, is unwarranted, unfair and irrational.

    I have, of course, not forgotten the possibility that God does not exist: in which case, you atheists have the easy task of writing them all off because they’re all wrong. But don’t forget that you cannot actually know God doesn’t exist, for the same reason that you accuse Christians of believing in God without any evidence.

    Just think, for a moment; what if someone has experienced something that you have not experienced. What authority do you have to dismiss them? I just wish you would all treat people with more respect, even if you don’t see things the way they do.

    I know my reference to a Loving God will drive you all crazy. It’s not there as bait, but simply to show you how believers see God.

    • You are free to say and believe what you want and I am not the ultimate arbiter of “correctness”. But, at least from my perspective, you have made tons of assumptions, most of which are deeply unfair and stereotypical. It is as if you have READ about atheists (through your christian filters) but that you have absolutely ZERO experience with any in real life.

      Here’s some examples:

      As for the question of why religion is not considered a mental illness: it seems unreasonable and irrational that you would so easily write off (or lock up) millions of people for simply believing something that you don’t believe.

      That is not and has never been a topic that atheists harp on. We’d like people locked up who break the law. We’d like to have “special exemptions for religious folks” done away with. But no one I’ve ever met calls for writing off or “lockin up” some one for the simple “crime” of believing different stuff. Religious folks do this every day and have done it every day from the beginning of recorded history. POT; KETTLE.

      What the commentators on this site generally do (which is unfair) is to pick out all the bits of the Bible they dislike and fire that as an accusation against Christians, and thereby, justify to themselves a discounting of God’s existence. That, as I said, is unwarranted, unfair and irrational.

      This does occur. You are correct to point it out. However, it occurs in response to religious folks who do the same thing. Look for a moment at the Catholic Mass. Talk about cherry picking! They trot out the same 500 or so verses from the bible while they stand on the lectern. The priests have homilies all set for the standard cherry picked verses. What about the other 20,000? POT;KETTLE.

      but think, too, about the good that many people are driven to do because of their Christian faith.

      Prove that it is their faith that is responsible and that they are not just “nice” people. Do not dismiss the blame and take the credit. Some people (religious as well as not) are nice people. Some are not. You’d have to do some pretty detailed research and have some real evidence of this to actually make this claim mean anything other than your own interpretation of it.

      The people you would dismiss as mentally ill would include doctors, scientists, teachers; indeed, people from all walks of live who, because of their faith in a loving God have sought to be good to their neighbors or have started humanitarian projects for the good of others.

      And you think that none of these groups could have mentally ill folks in their ranks? Then who is mentally ill? People that disagree with YOU? Again, you have to prove that they are doing this BECAUSE of god (a thing that is not even proven to exist)…. They might just be nice people. Also, how many of these do gooders would help an atheist? Or allow an atheist to assist them in their mission? They exclude and then claim superiority. You seem to be doing the same thing.

      But don’t forget that you cannot actually know God doesn’t exist, for the same reason that you accuse Christians of believing in God without any evidence.

      But don’t you forget that “those who assert something are obligated to prove it.” Wanna play a game? I will assert that oranges exist. Do you think I can prove it? You see, the reason I don’t think a god exists is because you have never offered any evidence. We do not have to prove otherwise. It comes down to confidence in ideas. I have confidence that oranges exist. I have very little confidence that a god does. You (erroneously) put them both on even footing and then back peddle to justify what you want and need to be correct even though you know you are probably wrong.

      Wishing is not the same as knowing. i respect that you wish. You do not respect that I know.

      In reply to #22 by Lonevoice:

      Reading some of the above comments, I’m forced to ponder what the commentators would do with “Born-again” Christians if in government etc. And, before you all leap on injustices that has been wrought by religious organisations, these cannot be denied: but think, too, about the good that many people…

      • In reply to #30 by crookedshoes:

        As for the question of why religion is not considered a mental illness: it seems unreasonable and irrational that you would so easily write off (or lock up) millions of people for simply believing something that you don’t believe. That is not and has never been a topic that atheists harp on.

        Unfortunately it is. At least if by atheists you include a non-trivial number of Dawkins supporters who comment on this site. Several times I’ve seen people comment that religious people are by definition mentally ill and I’ve tried debating with them a couple times as well about what a sensible definition of mental illness is. Also, the fact that advocating the state should treat religion as a mental illness and coerce the religious to seek psychiatric help (as people have seriously done on this site) is essentially one of the things the Soviet Union used to do, use the mental health system as a weapon against people whose beliefs the state didn’t agree with.

        • My point was that no one calls for their being locked up unless they break the law and that if a person breaks the law and then claims it was due to their religion (see faith healers and allowing children to die etc etc) they should not be “cut a break”. Perhaps I should have been more explicit. I have seen the references you speak of and am aware of the thought process. I guess I should have worded my post a bit more carefully. Thanks for highlighting my mistake.

          But, like the Nearly Naked Ape proffers, if they are hearing voices, perhaps they do need some help. BTW, don;t get me started on our treatment of the mentally ill and attitudes toward mentally ill folks here in the US; it is a disgrace.

          In reply to #31 by Red Dog:

          In reply to #30 by crookedshoes:

          As for the question of why religion is not considered a mental illness: it seems unreasonable and irrational that you would so easily write off (or lock up) millions of people for simply believing something that you don’t believe. That is not and has never been a t…

        • In reply to #31 by Red Dog:

          I think it depends. On the one hand, it’s too easy to dismiss an opponent as being deluded, and we should guard against such tactics. Declaring someone deluded for the crime of having wrong ideas is tantamount to saying mere intellectual difference is evil. Of course it isn’t, and to insist otherwise would be to expect perfection, a delusion of its own that punishes people for the crime of being human. In any case, if self-deception were a disease, then we’d all be sufferers.

          On the other hand, the psychiatric definition of a delusion fits well with how several religionists behave. When beliefs are taken way too seriously and are impervious to any kind of input from the real world, then they’re delusion. Yet, the only reason we don’t treat some religious people as deluded is because they’re protected by cultural traditions. In such a scenario, I think a case could be made that one should, whenever possible, expose it for what it is and declare it a delusion.

          To be fair, by that definition, most religious people are perfectly sane. I imagine they at least can acknowledge that their minds could be changed. But the ones who use it to dictate their twisted ideas of morality over others, and who jump through intellectual hoops to support a prior conclusion, are not, and one main reason why they aren’t described as deluded is that a history of religious privilege has left a widespread cultural legacy of favouritism towards religion that it doesn’t really deserve.

          Basically, you have a right to air or argue for your beliefs, and even to act on the more harmless ones, but the point is that if we treat them as any different from, say, delusions in superstition, in self-importance, or in any other way one could be deluded, then there’s a problem of double standards.

        • In reply to #31 by Red Dog:

          In reply to #30 by crookedshoes:

          As for the question of why religion is not considered a mental illness: it seems unreasonable and irrational that you would so easily write off (or lock up) millions of people for simply believing something that you don’t believe. That is not and has never been a t…

          I think that a survey of mental health patients that delves into their religious beliefs would be very interesting. Personally I would not be surprised if this survey revealed that a majority of patients have (or had) a serious, committed belief in the supernatural.

          As much as one can know oneself; I am certain that my religious up-bringing caused me to exist in a precarious mental state for much of my early adult life.

        • In reply to #31 by Red Dog:

          When I was a girl I remember coming across a woman on a soapbox expounding her version of fire and brimstone religion to everyone in earshot. She was literally foaming at the mouth with religious fervour. My mother pulled me aside ( because it was quite an alarming spectacle) and told me that the woman was mad and that asylums are full of such people. Things are different today and the lunatic asylums of old no longer exist, but there is a difference between frothing at the mouth madness and simply holding a different belief to the mainstream.

    • In reply to #22 by Lonevoice:

      But don’t forget that you cannot actually know God doesn’t exist, for the same reason that you accuse Christians of believing in God without any evidence.

      Which god is it that does not exist?

      I have seen no evidence that Xtians believe in all of them, so perhaps you can explain how Xtians can dismiss all these other gods, and yet seem to think atheists should accept theirs (different Xtians don’t even claim the same specifications for their various versions of gods) – without evidence.

      Absence of evidence (where there should be evidence) is evidence of absence.

    • In reply to #22 by Lonevoice:

      Reading some of the above comments, I’m forced to ponder what the commentators would do with “Born-again” Christians if in government etc.

      Hello again Lonevoice. I can’t speak for every over the top commentator on the site but if you want to know if a majority atheist country would start putting Christians into death camps or insane asylums I suggest you simply look at countries like Norway and Iceland. To the best of my knowledge, that’s not happening there.

      As for the question of why religion is not considered a mental illness: it seems unreasonable and irrational that you would so easily write off (or lock up) millions of people for simply believing something that you don’t believe. The audacity of such a presumption is staggering.

      I don’t believe that religious belief in it’s self is a mental illness. I think it’s a form of cognitive dissonance, which affects many people (even my self sometimes) over a whole range of topics. Believing in some kind of vague, unknowable, ubiquitous cosmic force that somehow controls everything is one thing, believing in a being that’s supposed to be the epitome of love and forgiveness yet sends seventy to eighty percent of every person that’s ever lived to be tortured for eternity because they weren’t perfect is cognitive dissonance.

      The people you would dismiss as mentally ill would include doctors, scientists, teachers;

      Isaac Newton may have been the most brilliant person that ever lived, that doesn’t mean alchemy is true.

      What the commentators on this site generally do (which is unfair) is to pick out all the bits of the Bible they dislike and fire that as an accusation against Christians, and thereby, justify to themselves a discounting of God’s existence. That, as I said, is unwarranted, unfair and irrational.

      There’s parts of the Bible that are so bad they taint the whole rest of the book. It’s a bit like saying I have this great uncle. He loves me, he takes me places, he buys me all kinds of great stuff but he’s molested me three or four times, besides that he’s great. Lonevoice, god killed every single person in world in Genesis, save one family. It asks a father to kill his child, it permitted the torture of the most moral man on the planet along with the murder of his family to satisfy a petty bet with Satan.It told the Jews to murder homosexuals and adulterous women by stoning them to death yet you continue to hold this entity up as the wisest most benevolent mind in the universe. Cognitive dissonance.

      Just think, for a moment; what if someone has experienced something that you have not experienced. What authority do you have to dismiss them?

      I think this is where we start to venture into the domain of mental illness (or at the very least over active imagination). If your hearing voices that are telling you to do things, I tend to think your dealing with some kind of illness. Not because your Christian, just because your ill. I’ve tried contacting god many times. I’m up late at night, can’t sleep, got nothing better to do so I give it a try. I think it would be quite a interesting experience to interact with a god, but nothing ever, ever, ever happens, and that makes me skeptical about other people. I don’t believe that they have some kind of special power I don’t have. I find it hard to believe that every Jimbo and Bubba in Mississippi has this close, personal relationship with god, yet Mother Teresa (who the Vatican will make a saint one day) agonized for decades about the fact that she couldn’t feel god’s presence. You have whole regions of the world where god doesn’t seem to want to talk with anybody. That makes no sense.
      .

      • In reply to #48 by Ryan1306:

        In reply to #22 by Lonevoice:

        Hello again Lonevoice. I can’t speak for every over the top commentator on the site but if you want to know if a majority atheist…

        Thank you for the reassurance that the comments I had referred to were over the top. I am under no illusion that all atheists without exception would act upon the extreme comments that have been posted.

        There would also be much to talk about if this were not such a public platform. The Bible refereneces you have alluded to are indeed difficult, to say the least and there are theological explanations. Howver, we would be off topic if we were to tackle them here.

        There are many and varied reasons why diferent people ‘hear’ from God, and some (probably most) coild be explained by cognative dissonance or even mental illness and delusion. However, you already know that I do not think that that necessarily means that God cannot exist.

        For anyone who would come to him has to must beleive that he exists. I will be accused of circular reasoning, but if he really is wiser than man, he can hide himself or make himself known at will. The thing is; he is not accountable to man for that, but rather it’s other way round.

        good to hear from you

        • In reply to #51 by Lonevoice:

          Thank you for the reassurance that the comments I had referred to were over the top. I am under no illusion that all atheists without exception would act upon the extreme comments that have been posted.

          Yet you generalised. Does the Westbro Baptist Church speak for all Christianity? Of course not. Think about it please. that of believers. Some atheists are bitter bastards because they have seen the crimes against humanity that were carried out in the name of religion up close and personal, other atheists are wishy washy because they have been fortunate enough to have lived in an environment without much religious confrontation and have a “lets not upset the religious fuckwits because every believer I’ve ever come into contact has been a jolly decent chap”. That’s okay…but they shouldn’t sit in their ivory towers dictating the best way to address the issue.

          There would also be much to talk about if this were not such a public platform. The Bible refereneces you have alluded to are indeed difficult, to say the least and there are theological explanations. Howver, we would be off topic if we were to tackle them here.

          Yep, lets talk only about 20% of the scriptures that are nice and avoid 80% of the word of GOD that is totally shite as inconvenient for these times, times that an omniscient deity might well have been aware about..

          There are many and varied reasons why diferent people ‘hear’ from God, and some (probably most) coild be explained by cognative dissonance or even mental illness and delusion. However, you already know that I do not think that that necessarily means that God cannot exist.

          One of the discriptions might be schizophrenia….

          “.A person diagnosed with schizophrenia may experience hallucinations (most reported are hearing voices), delusions (often bizarre or persecutory in nature), and disorganized thinking and speech.”

          But if you grant cognitive dissonance or even mental illness and delusion as a possibility for MOST others(believers), why then, do you exempt yourself?

          Do you think Hindus are rational in espousing 33 million gods? Nah, I didn’t think so. When it comes to other religions, or even denominations, “cognitive dissonance or even mental illness and delusion” is par for the course…Scientologies Thetans for example?

          Why is Peter Sutcliffe in a mental institution and George W. Bush is not?

          For anyone who would come to him has to must beleive that he exists. I will be accused of circular reasoning, but if he really is wiser than man, he can hide himself or make himself known at will. The thing is; he is not accountable to man for that, but rather it’s other way round.

          Bollocks, word salad…nonsense…postmodernist garble. Who is “HE”? If “HE” is not accountable> to man, why should man give a flying fig?

          good to hear from you

          Support is always going to be welcomed. Some call it accommodationist.

    • In reply to #22 by Lonevoice:

      Just think, for a moment; what if someone has experienced something that you have not experienced. What authority do you have to dismiss them?

      A friend of mine insists she has a gift to connect with ghosts, spirits, etc. She shares these experiences with me and I usually respond with a dull, Uh-huh. She will then say, “You believe me don’t you? It’s important that you believe me; I don’t want you to think I’m nuts.” I say to her that if she believes it I’m cool with that. But she presses – she wants some sort of validation from me. I can’t give it. The thing is, and I explain this to her, is that I don’t care that she sees ghosts. It’s not something I’m wowed by, it simply doesn’t interest me. Same goes for gods and notions of an afterlife, reincarnation, hell, heaven and so on. I don’t dismiss her, because she is my great friend goblins and all, but I do dismiss her ideas on that subject. The reason is that to me being dead is the end. I don’t see it any other way, nor do I care to. So my brain can’t even process what she’s saying, forget about believing it, so there’s nothing I can do but dismiss it.

  9. Any time I see stats like this I wonder how statisticians correct for the right answer bias.
    I think many times, particularly during war, or in a police state, the respondent will tell you what they think you want to hear.

    For example if some guy with a Marine haircut and corny full body tatts, were to ask me my opinions of the US military, I might not be forthcoming. If some little old ladies with flowers on stems growing out of their hats asked me about my opinions of Jesus, I might give them a seriously watered down version of my true opinions. If a tall, bearded young man with a shaggy haircut were to ask me questions about the environment, I might tend to exaggerate just how much of an activist I am.

  10. My ex wife is intelligent but deeply religious. She voted for G.W. Bush (twice!) because, she said, God told her to. This after shedding tears of fury at the president’s mendacity in starting the Mideast wars (our son was in the military at the time). On gentle questioning, it turned out that the actual words had come from her Southern Baptist minister who presumably was the Big Guy’s interpreter. Many people crave easy, simple answers and want to be let off the hook for hard decisions and their consequences. These “moderate” religionists and their leaders fuel more of the horror in the world than all of the extremists combined.

    }}}}

  11. According to one chart, 34% of people never did something because dog told them. Now either dog never told them, or they were told, and decided to ignore it. Always look on the bright side.

  12. 22: Lonevoice.

    People do good things out of the innate altruism and compassion which we all possess; religion is surplus to requirements.

    In fact, belief in one religion can prevent the holder of that particular set of beliefs from showing any kindness at all to someone who holds beliefs in a different religion. Indeed, sectarian murders are commonplace.

    I don’t think you’ll find secular individuals behaving in that manner.

    • In reply to #29 by crookedshoes:

      The ultimate cop out. Why, then is it not admissible in court? Because it is a bullshit statement.

      You can certainly argue the point in court if you want. On the evidence, it might well fly with a US jury.

      But it didn’t do Joan of Arc a lot of good with the Inquisition.

  13. So 38% of Americans are hearing voices?? Religion IS a mental disorder. It’s the only explanation I can find for intelligent otherwise rational people for believing in such nonsense.

  14. The voice in our heads is our own conscience – the voice of reason – our moral sense of right and wrong

    If you are finding it difficult to distinguish between yourself and what’s perceived as another, you may actually be mentally ill….
    It isn’t normal to hear a voice that’s not your own inner voice, especially if its commanding you to do stuff…..very scary !
    and its not the same as people memorising the sound of their deceased parents voices etc….That’s just the mind re-creating the memory of their voices……
    Those who claim to hear god …its not god….its you…

  15. Studies have been done regarding this issue. Apparently God tells Christians of different denominations different things about the same topic. For example, he may tell a Catholic that contraception is a sin, but he tells a Protestant that it’s a good thing for family planning. Interesting…

  16. Believing that an invisible being is telling you to do something is showing signs of mental health issues. If it was anyone other than the Religiously deluded claiming this, they would be into therapy before they could say “Amen”. No good can come of this, especially since there are more than a few of them in the House and Senate of the US.

  17. God having a chat with one of these brain damaged religious victim!
    Are there any Muslims who have a chat with Allah?
    Belief in devils,angels,heaven ,hell etc.is as absurd as belief in fairies.
    My guardian angel has never chastised me!

  18. On the topic of mental illness, and partially in response to Lonevoice.

    If any one of us encountered someone on the street, who proclaimed they could hear the voice of God and he was commanding them to do all sorts of things such as tell you to obey certain commandments or attempt to heal the sick, you would believe he was crazy. Some of you more theistic-minded individuals may be strung a long for a while but you too would eventually concede that he was probably insane the more he went on and on about this voice inside his head.

    We do this all the time and we constantly lock people up in psychiatric institutions because of it. But it would be impossible for anyone other than the individual hearing the voices to ascertain whether or not this really was the voice of God.

    From this we can only draw two conclusions.

    Either it’s incredibly likely that Moses, Jesus and any number of other biblical prophets in history or biblical fiction were all insane, hearing voices in their heads.

    Or our mental asylums are jam packed full of prophets in communion with a vague and inconsistent deity.

    You can’t practically claim any middle ground as it would be impossible to determine which ones were really speaking to God. If you believe it’s possible Moses was really communicating with God, then you must concede the possibility that everyone locked up in a mental asylum could be the real deal. If so, why are you not concerned about it? You should be campaigning to have every single one of them set free.

    Worse yet, we could have locked up the second coming of Christ! Are you just going to stand by and let that happen, or will you concede it’s possible that the entire Bible could be the ramblings of mad men?

    • In reply to #50 by Seraphor:

      will you concede it’s possible that the entire Bible could be the ramblings of mad men?

      Or liars. Don’t forget the possibility that the whole thing could be fiction…

    • In reply to #50 by Seraphor:

      On the topic of mental illness, and partially in response to Lonevoice.

      If any one of us encountered someone on the street, who proclaimed they could hear the voice of God and he was commanding them to do all sorts of things such as tell you to obey certain commandments or attempt to heal the sick,…

      A lot of good points made there…but there are a lot of Dudley Do Rights commenting here. A quick scope of definitions should be enough for most to get their head round the subject.

      So….Red Dog, strawman skyscrapers aside…explain why, in your opinion, that belief in religion and the mythological scriptures is not delusional, asinine or ignorant…compartmentalisation being taken into consideration of course.

      Bearing in mind I consider my mother to be ignorant, stupid and delusional when it comes to religion. in an objective understanding of those three words of course. …I love my mother to bits by the way. as I do many other ignorant, stupid and delusional friends and familiy.

  19. CHRIST,
    VOICES MAKE NOISE. Noise is disturbance in the particles that comprise the AIR. If someone can FUCKING hear it, it MUST be a disturbance in the air, Even if I cannot “hear it” I can MEASURE it. Does everyone NEED a lesson in basic physics?

    Do these “hearers” of the dead possess substructures in their ears that the rest of us do not have? Certainly we’d be able to DETECT THEM. As well as the “sound” that hey hear. THERMODYNAMICS ANYONE?

    Stop with the “maybe” bullshit. Here is how it works. SOUND is measurable, even if a person cannot hear it. We know that elephants communicate in a pitch that human ears cannot hear. BUT WE CAN MEASURE IT. You are being fucking stupid really really fucking stupid if you assert that certain people can “hear” things that you cannot. Hear? YES. MEASURE? no.

    stop the bullshit.

    Can humans “see” in ultraviolet? NO? Then how do we know it exists? This is perhaps the most rigorous exercise in “dumb” that I have been witness to in all the years I’ve contributed to this site. Goddamn. Are you kidding me?

    Energy is measurable. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE demonstrate just ONE example of this being wrong. Just one exception. If not stop spouting off horseshit and trying to get it to pass for acceptable.

    • In reply to #54 by crookedshoes:

      CHRIST,
      VOICES MAKE NOISE. Noise is disturbance in the particles that comprise the AIR. If someone can FUCKING hear it, it MUST be a disturbance in the air, Even if I cannot “hear it” I can MEASURE it. Does everyone NEED a lesson in basic physics?

      Do these “hearers” of the dead possess substruc…

      Sir…have you been imbibing? While I completely agree with you…you need to watch that sort of attitude. Tone trolls are everywhere.

      • Amos,
        You are so damn smart (and here I thought I read somewhere that atheists are unintelligent). Apologies for the tone of the post — it was influenced by — you guessed it! Two Crown Royal Manhattans. Delicious (not so nutritious), but definitely fuel for my attitude with this post. I stand by it; minus the profanity and capitalization!

        In reply to #57 by Ignorant Amos:

        In reply to #54 by crookedshoes:

        CHRIST,
        VOICES MAKE NOISE. Noise is disturbance in the particles that comprise the AIR. If someone can FUCKING hear it, it MUST be a disturbance in the air, Even if I cannot “hear it” I can MEASURE it. Does everyone NEED a lesson in basic physics?

        Do these “hea…

        • In reply to #58 by crookedshoes:

          Apologies for the tone of the post — it was influenced by — you guessed it! Two Crown Royal Manhattans. Delicious (not so nutritious), but definitely fuel for my attitude with this post. I stand b…

          Two drinks of CR fueled that post? Alcohol is not your friend. Were you able to hear person with the bullhorn yelling: MAN OVERBOARD – I REPEAT, MAN OVERBOARD! Maybe try reading posts a few times before going into freak-a-zoid mode. You might find you’ve actually misread something or decided to plop in a few extra meanings, which would mean that you actually reacted to your own thoughts.

  20. An emphasis upon the mind and subjective thought in prayer can be potentially dangerous. I can’t say though that these statistics point merely to only those groups who hear “small voices” but indeed I’m sure it probably refers to some.

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