How Our Minds Mislead Us: The Marvels and Flaws of Our Intuition | Brain Pickings

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“The confidence people have in their beliefs is not a measure of the quality of evidence but of the coherence of the story that the mind has managed to construct.”

Every year, intellectual impresario and Edge editor John Brockman summons some of our era’s greatest thinkers and unleashes them on one provocative question, whether it’s the single most elegant theory of how the world works orthe best way to enhance our cognitive toolkit. This year, he sets out on the most ambitious quest yet, a meta-exploration of thought itself:Thinking: The New Science of Decision-Making, Problem-Solving, and Prediction (public library) collects short essays and lecture adaptations from such celebrated and wide-ranging (though not in gender) minds as Daniel DennettJonathan HaidtDan Gilbert, and Timothy Wilson, covering subjects as diverse as morality, essentialism, and the adolescent brain.

One of the most provocative contributions comes from Nobel-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman — author of the indispensable Thinking, Fast and Slow, one of the best psychology books of 2012 — who examines “the marvels and the flaws of intuitive thinking.” 

Written By: Marla Popova
continue to source article at brainpickings.org

8 COMMENTS

    • In reply to #1 by Joz:

      My head is exploding at the thought of these authors teaming up.

      are THEY teaming up or being TEAMED up? i mean, is this a collection of already expressed thoughts, ideas, and observations, or something that these thinkers were asked for this specific publication?

      • In reply to #2 by Net:

        In reply to #1 by Joz:

        My head is exploding at the thought of these authors teaming up.

        are THEY teaming up or being TEAMED up? i mean, is this a collection of already expressed thoughts, ideas, and observations, or something that these thinkers were asked for this specific publication?

        I’m pretty sure it’s a collection, not an original work by all combined. You can tell by the cover it says “edited by John Brockman”. Still looks awesome though.

      • In reply to #2 by Net:

        are THEY teaming up or being TEAMED up? i mean, is this a collection of already expressed thoughts, ideas, and observations, or something that these thinkers were asked for this specific publication?

        According to a reviewer on Amazon, this book may well be worth getting. It certainly has an impressive line-up that would be worth reading in its own right — even if what they say is not exactly new.

        Also, from my recollection of the way Edge.org works, the publisher (John Brockman) asks a new question every year, and then selects leading thinkers to attempt a reply to it; the replies are then compiled in a book.

  1. This would suggest those good at religion have an unusual talent for ignoring contrary evidence. They see a unity in the bible that is not there. They are also people who tend to stick with their first hunch no matter what they learn later..

  2. Daniel Kahneman’s book “Thinking Fast and Slow” is itself a sort of collection of all the research he did with Amos Tversky on experimental psychology. A must read for students of critical thinking. Heady, fascinating stuff on the heuristics of intuitive judgments and cognitive illusions. He demonstrates how our intuitions can mislead us even when we are aware of their power to mislead.

    This man is years ahead of his time and and the sad thing is that many contemporary psychologists and therapists aren’t even aware of his work despite its crucial findings on how the human mind works.

  3. In the movies, any hunch always trumps reason. I presume the audience identifies with the hunch-haver and likes to see himself triumph over better-educated people. A side effect though is over-valuing hunches.

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