Lost Neanderthal Home Found On British Island, Discovery Brings Up ‘Exciting Possibilities’

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Scientists have stumbled upon a long-lost home for Neanderthals believed to have been lost through excavation 100 years ago.

In 2011, Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) scientists found preserved geological deposits in a cave on the island of Jersey, located off the coast of Normandy, France. The site, which houses sediments that date back to the last Ice Age, contains the only known late Neanderthal remains in northwestern Europe.

"We were sure from the outset that the deposits held some archaeological potential, but these dates indicate we have uncovered something exceptional," Dr. Matt Pope of the Institute of Archaeology at University College London, who helped lead the research, said in a statement. "We have a sequence of deposits which span the last 120,000 years still preserved at the site. Crucially, this covers the period in which Neanderthal populations apparently went 'extinct.'"

Written By: Zoe Mintz
continue to source article at ibtimes.com

5 COMMENTS

  1. When I was in England I toured the Wookey Hole caves. It is used today partly to age cheese. But what impressed me was a story of continuous occupation of the cave up almost to the present day. I could see how good it was for defence, but it would be pitch black inside without some sort of torch. It would have a even temperature all year round. You would have been protected from rain, wind and snow. Caves for humanoids must have been in short supply.

    • In reply to #2 by CEVA34:

      Our early ancestors would have needed to be careful exploring a potential cave-home, in case something large and unfriendly was already in residence!

      I am not sure about sea-levels or if Jersey was isolated from the European mainland at that time, but it is now a small island only a few miles long

      Jersey is 9 x 5 miles, (14.49 km East to West and 8.05km North to South ) 45 square miles. – 100 miles (160 km) south of mainland Britain, 14 miles (20 km) from the coast of France, situated in the bay of St Malo.

      If it was a small island then, it would probably be too small to support large predators.

      • In reply to #3 by Alan4discussion:

        I am not sure about sea-levels or if Jersey was isolated from the European mainland at that time, but it is now a small island only a few miles long….If it was a small island then, it would probably be too small to support large predators.

        I saw a documentary (I think it was “Coast”) that showed evidence that mammoths had been hunted in Jersey in canyons that are now under the sea. It was certainly connected to the European mainland in the past.

  2. There’s probably a lot more evidence of Neanderthal in Britain around the now underwater but previous coast line of UK before 50,000 Years ago and especially Doggerland where they dredge up mammoth bones quite regularly….

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