Al-Qaeda in Syria raids wedding party, warns against music and singing

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Al-Qaeda’s main branch in Syria, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), has raided a wedding party in the suburb of Aleppo and ordered stopping music and singing, the Asharq al-Awsat reported, quoting Syrian activists.

“One leader of the Islamic State warned residents that if a music band is invited to a wedding again, the person responsible will be arrested because this is immoral,” the newspaper reported, citing an internet page of the Syrian Revolution in Menbej.

The al-Qaeda leader reportedly asked the man in charge of the wedding to memorize a verse of the Quran and attend several religious courses at al-Qaeda’s center in Maskana, near Aleppo.

Written By: Al Arabiya
continue to source article at english.alarabiya.net

40 COMMENTS

    • In reply to Al Arabiya:

      “Al-Qaeda’s main branch in Syria…”

      “Main Branch?” In other words, in Syria, Al-Qaeda is now like a library system in a major American city. There’s a “Main Branch” and numerous satellite branches. Does this branch also have a headquarters, like say, Walmart does in Benton Arkansas? Finally, do Hamas, Hezbollah and The Taliban all also have “Main Branches” in Syria, and are the four organizations in competition with one another for…for…I don’t know, whatever?

      • In reply to #8 by IDLERACER:

        In reply to Al Arabiya:

        “Al-Qaeda’s main branch in Syria…”

        “Main Branch?” In other words, in Syria, Al-Qaeda is now like a library system in a major American city. There’s a “Main Branch” and numerous satellite branches. Does this branch also have a headquarters, like say, Walmart does in Benton…

        I hear Hamas do a better selection of bacon, but the Taliban have a two-for-one on hot dog sausages at the mo…

  1. Where did this no music no dancing thing come from? I don’t recall reading it in the Qur’an.

    Ashcroft demonstrated the Christian expression of this belief.

    The Buddhists decried “pot blowing” a primitive form of music on the grounds it made people too attached to the senses.

    • In reply to #2 by Roedy:I doubt that Buddhists slaughtered anybody over such, however.

      Where did this no music no dancing thing come from? I don’t recall reading it in the Qur’an.

      Ashcroft demonstrated the Christian expression of this belief.

      The Buddhists decried “pot blowing” a primitive form of music on the grounds it made people too attached to the senses.

    • In reply to #2 by Roedy:

      Where did this no music no dancing thing come from? I don’t recall reading it in the Qur’an.Ashcroft demonstrated the Christian expression of this belief.The Buddhists decried “pot blowing” a primitive form of music on the grounds it made people too attached to the senses.

      It could have come from the Plymouth Brethren; although to give them their due, you are allowed to sing, but only the songs they permit.

      I speak as one who knows.

  2. Thanks Russia and China. By preventing the West from doing a “Libya job” very early in the Syrian civil war, you turned a reasonable chance of a peaceful secular Syrian state emerging in the next few years into a bloody sectarian mess that will fester for decades.

  3. If western culture and education are haram then why these sanctimonious prigs are using sniper, missile launcher, tanks and grenades and other modern tools of warfare instead of limiting to swords, bows and arrows, spears and axes just like their Muhammad.

    • In reply to #4 by prabo.bhil:

      If western culture and education are haram then why these sanctimonious prigs are using sniper, missile launcher, tanks and grenades and other modern tools of warfare instead of limiting to swords, bows and arrows, spears and axes just like their Muhammad.

      Not to mention computers, the Internet, mobile phones, televisions, radio, cars, lorries, motorbikes…

      I don’t remember any of these being mentioned in the Koran or being Islamic inventions either…

      • In reply to #9 by Dr Bob:

        In reply to #4 by prabo.bhil:

        If western culture and education are haram then why these sanctimonious prigs are using sniper, missile launcher, tanks and grenades and other modern tools of warfare instead of limiting to swords, bows and arrows, spears and axes just like their Muhammad.

        Not to ment…

        Think what would happen if the Amish all of the sudden got pissed-off at the world, armed themselves and began fighting mormons, catholics, lutherns, etc. A religious civil war with no good outcome. All of you religious people, go back to 1850, stay there and leave the rest of us alone.

  4. Afghanistan illustrates the fundamental unfairness of the earth. Imagine having to choose between ruled by Al Qaeda, the Taliban or the Americans. You just want them all to go away and leave you to your traditional ways.

    • In reply to #5 by Roedy:

      Afghanistan illustrates the fundamental unfairness of the earth. Imagine having to choose between ruled by Al Qaeda, the Taliban or the Americans. You just want them all to go away and leave you to your traditional ways.

      Traditional ways? One should brush up on Afghan history and stop hating America so much at every opportunity.

        • In reply to #20 by aldous:

          In reply to #17 by veggiemanuk:

          Traditional ways? One should brush up on Afghan history and stop hating America so much at every opportunity.

          Jihadist America has no legitimate place in Afghanistan.

          Jihadist America…… I lost interest at this point.

          • In reply to #27 by inquisador:

            In reply to #20 by aldous:

            In reply to #17 by veggiemanuk:

            Jihadist America has no legitimate place in Afghanistan.

            Jihadist America??

            What is that?

            According to Wiki, jihad translates as struggle, particularly against those who do not believe in the Islamic God.

            The “lesser jihad” is the physical struggle against the enemies of Islam.

            If you were to substitute the words Christian and Christianity for Islamic and Islam in the above, you might find yourself faced with something called Dominionism, a doctrine which states that Christians have the God-given right to impose their religion on the world and govern over non-Christians.

            Harmless enough arrogance from our Jesus-worshipping friends; nothing new here. Except that two people who wish to hold the office of President of the United States have links to this movement.

            Those good folks who can hardly wait for the moment the beardy one makes his return and they all go floating off to Heaven, sans clothing, to observe the Apocalypse from atop a comfy cloud, and whose ranks include the aforementioned Governor Perry and Rep. Bachmann, support the state of Israel because their Bible tells them its existence is a prerequisite before the Rapture can commence.

            Israel – God’s Prophetic Timepiece:

            …As God turns back to Israel and pours out His Wrath on their enemies, these two wars are likely to usher in the Tribulation, where God will test and refine Israel. As a result, Israel will come to a saving knowledge that Jesus is Messiah (Zechariah 12-14). The events of “Daniel’s 70th Week” will begin in Israel, expand out globally, and return back to Israel in Armageddon, right before Jesus returns. Israel is clearly God’s “timepiece” and the “epicenter” of prophecy.

            I don’t know about you, but all this sounds sort of jihaddy to me.

          • In reply to #28 by Katy Cordeth:

            I don’t know about you, but all this sounds sort of jihaddy to me.

            I’m fine if people want to reserve Jihad for Islamic holy warriors but there are plenty of things about the US military that seem pretty much like holy war to me:

            Bible Verses inscribed on US Army gun sights

            War on Terror is a battle against Satan says US general

            Discussing the battle against a Muslim warlord, US General Boykin told an audience, “I knew my God was bigger than his. I knew that my God was a real God and his was an idol.”

            Edit: Sorry some of those links were messed up. I think they are fixed now.

  5. Music is played in taverns and other places of pleasure which lead people away from the true path so it is haram. Apparently listening to music distracts your attention from Allah to earthly things whereas banging your head on the floor has the effect of focusing your attention. Simples!

    • In reply to #15 by Free Speech:

      Islam, the blood-lust totalitarian ideology of fun and games …

      The ideology is refined to the point of being Monty Pythonesque.

      Al-Qaeda chief Ayman al-Zawahiri on Friday ordered ISIL to disband and stop interfering in Syria. He said al-Qaeda in Syria is to be represented only buy al-Nusra Front.

      The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) is to be abolished, while the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI) remains functioning,” he said in a video.

    • In reply to #16 by Blasphemyman:

      Slaves to dogma enforcing slavery to Allah.
      Extreme religious dogma is nothing more than bully boy misery!

      Yep. And worse, this particular brand of human misery self-replicates like a meme. Which is what makes it so dangerous to mankind. It’s the only kind of mental disorder that is contagious.

  6. Jihad is an ideology, not really equivalent to any other religions.

    It has as its’ goal the establishment of worldwide peace, by the dominion of Muslims, for all people, under Islam and sharia law. By any and all available means; however long it may take.

    This is of course a totalitarian aspiration, which if achieved would entail the slaughter of all the people who refused to convert or to be subjugated as dhimmis (paying special taxes and being bound by oppressive rules, without the same rights as muslims)

    Not forgetting all the cultural richness that comes with Islam, such as capital punishment, including crucifixion, stoning for adultery, beheading. Warfare with other Muslims for sectarian differences, slavery of women and prisoners of war. Even burning of houses with their occupants for failing to attend mosque is credited to Mohammed. None of this can be compared with the relatively harmless religious nuttery of American Christians.

    To suggest otherwise is to take cultural relativity to inane lengths. It’s like saying that in WW2 the allies were as bad as the Nazis, because both sides were religious.
    Perhaps when Hamas, inspired by the example of Mohammed in de-Judaising the Arabian Peninsular, finally realize their ambition to slaughter all the Jews, as promised in their founding charter, you might then admit the similarity between Islam and Fascism.

    I suppose what US General Boykin should have said is something like :-

    “My God is that of the Old Testament; a nasty, capricious and vicious being, and the God of the Muslims is exactly the same God.

    The difference is that we have a New Testament, in which Jesus mitigates some of that OT savagery with some goodness and morality. This has taught us to ignore most of the worst old Biblical crap and start to think for ourselves at least a bit.

    Sadly we can’t say the same for the Muslims, who still adhere to the cruellest and crappiest stuff in the Bible as well as some even worse beliefs from other sources. So although we share the same God, that is about all we have in common.”

    • In reply to #30 by inquisador:

      we have a New Testament, in which Jesus mitigates some of that OT savagery with some goodness and morality.

      It generates hypocritical statements but has no effect on ‘savagery’. In WW2 Christian Germany and Christian Britain behaved ‘savagely’ beyond the wildest aspirations of Muslims today.

      • In reply to #31 by aldous:

        In reply to #30 by inquisador:

        we have a New Testament, in which Jesus mitigates some of that OT savagery with some goodness and morality.

        It generates hypocritical statements but has no effect on ‘savagery’. In WW2 Christian Germany and Christian Britain behaved ‘savagely’ beyond the wildest aspirations of Muslims today….

        So are you saying that Britain was equally as unjust or immoral as Nazi Germany on account of her necessarily savage conduct of the war? If not what do you mean?

        In reply to 32 by Gogat
        >

        You should probably put a little OT (over time) into your thought on this subject.

        You may be right. I am thinking right now about how the cultural relativists manage to avoid noticing the great evil of one religion while obsessing on the crimes of another. As if that somehow cancels things out.

        It doesn’t. The evils of Islam are absolutely separate and differently caused from those of Christianity. Each deserves independent attention. You do at least get a point for not mentioning the Inquisition. No-one expected that!

    • In reply to #30 by inquisador:

      “Jihad is an ideology, not really equivalent to any other religions.

      It has as its’ goal the establishment of worldwide peace, by the dominion of Muslims, for all people, under Islam and sharia law. By any and all available means; however long it may take.

      This is of course a totalitarian aspiratio…”

      So I guess Christians burning of Jewish synagogues in fourth and fifth century is not comparable?
      Or maybe Christopher Columbus and John Winthrop were a part of the Christian OT, huh?
      What about Reverend Solomon Stoddard(“[train dogs] to hunt Indians as they do bears”) or Colonel John Chivington..
      You should probably put a little OT (over time) into your thought on this subject because this is buried into the Christian identity. Father Abraham had many sons as it seems.

  7. Thanks Qatar and Saudi Arabia. By financing, arming and training some of the most bloodthirsty religious fanatics on the planet from very early on in the Syrian civil war, you turned a reasonably peaceful, secular Syrian state, which had already embarked on a programme of democratic reform, into a bloody sectarian mess that will fester for decades.

    • In reply to #34 by Dubhlinneach:

      Thanks Qatar and Saudi Arabia. By financing, arming and training some of the most bloodthirsty religious fanatics on the planet from very early on in the Syrian civil war, you turned a reasonably peaceful, secular Syrian state, which had already embarked on a programme of democratic reform, into a…

      Are you saying that Bahar al-Assad was “on a programme of democratic reform”? That’s a ridiculous claim. He is one of the worst tyrants left on the planet. I’m not supporting Saudi Arabia or Qatar, I’m sure that they don’t give a damn about the people of Syria and are supporting the opposition for their own motives but there is no way Assad was on the road to democracy.

      • That is exactly what I am saying. Before any of the protests began, he changed the Syrian constitution removing the clause stating that the Ba’ath party had a special leading role. Provisions were introduced permitting all parties to stand in elections. Religious sectarian parties were banned (quite sensible, as in a multi-confessional state like Syria they could tear society apart – as they are now trying to do.) He limited the Presidency to two terms.

        That was just the beginning. He had proposed a national dialogue among all groups designed to come up with a consensus on further reforms such a s a free press and all the rest. It wasn’t exactly Norway but genuine democratic progress was being made in a transition from a dictatorial regime to what would have been the most progressive, secular democratic regime in the Middle East.

        Then came the (legitimate) protests. The security services reacted in the old fashioned fascistic way. The Saudis and Qataris saw their opportunity to exploit it and replace Assad with an anti-Iranian Salafist-Islamist dictatorship. They organised and financed the religious fascists. Then all hell broke loose. That was the end of reforms. The liberal protesters were driven off the streets by the most vicious gangs of sectarian killers outside of Afghanistan. There are no good guys here but Assad is definitely the best of the bad choices available.

        In reply to #35 by Red Dog:

        In reply to #34 by Dubhlinneach:

        Thanks Qatar and Saudi Arabia. By financing, arming and training some of the most bloodthirsty religious fanatics on the planet from very early on in the Syrian civil war, you turned a reasonably peaceful, secular Syrian state, which had already embarked on a progr…

        • In reply to #37 by Dubhlinneach:

          That is exactly what I am saying. Before any of the protests began, he changed the Syrian constitution removing the clause stating that the Ba’ath party had a special leading role. Provisions were introduced permitting all parties to stand in elections. Religious sectarian parties were banned (q…

          So you think a guy who can do this:

          Assad’s Regime of Torture

          Assad’s House of Torture

          Assad Regime Torture Chamber

          would actually be capable of democratic reforms? Based on what? What credible human rights activist or middle east expert has said that was ever a possibility?

          It is true that Saudi Arabia supports terrorists to overthrow Assad (and Saudi Arabia is about the same as Assad when it comes to human rights) but one of the few friends that stick by Assad is Hezbollah who are also terrorists:

          Hezbollah reaffirms support for Syria’s Assad

  8. Al Qaeda’s branch in Syria, ISIL, has a cousin organisation in Nigeria called “Boko Haram,” which roughly means “Western education is forbidden” (the word ‘boko’, apparently is derived from the English word for book, while ‘haram’ is Arabic for ‘forbidden’).

    Music Forbidden. Books Forbidden. It would be hard to come up with a more succinct, accurate summary of this life-asphyxiating ideology than its adherents’ own self-description.

  9. @ Red Dog, Comment 38:

    “So you think a guy who can [preside over torture chambers] would actually be capable of democratic reforms?”

    As a matter of logic, obviously.
    As a matter of fact, Assad has already introduced some democratic reform, not cosmetic ones.
    As a matter of historical record, there is no shortage of people who played a leading role in highly repressive regimes and then introduced democratic change.

    Mikhael Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin were very senior leaders in the old Soviet Union. Yet they brought in a democratic transformation, Gorbachev because he believed in it, Yeltsin more out of ego and personal ambition to be top dog. Russia today is no model of Swiss democracy but it is a democracy of sorts. It is led by a former KGB colonel. Back in the old days, I doubt very much if Miranda Rights featured much in his interrogation techniques. Yet he has safeguarded the democracy that was achieved and no-one can doubt he is the legitimate choice of the Russian people.

    China, of course, is not a democracy of any sorts. Yet they had a very wise leader, the late Deng Tsiao Ping who led an economic transformation to the benefit of all Chinese, without giving up the repressive apparatus one iota. I don’t thing any student of history would doubt that pragmatists like Deng would lead democratic transformations if they thought it necessary to achieve their idea of progress.

    Algeria has a democratic system and government (although quite corrupt but this is typical of that part of the world). In the Algerian Civil War of 1990-2000, 200,000 people were killed. Journalists like Robert Fisk and Lara Marlowe exposed many appalling atrocities committed by the regime to put down that Islamist rebellion. Some of the leaders of that time are still in power today (elected).

    All of this is by way of pointing out that the most astute political leaders introduce great change and are capable of complete volte-faces when they realise that it is no longer possible to rule in the old way. Gorbachev and Yelstin understood that. Assad, I think, understands that. Saddam Hussein did not, That’s the difference.

    We could also look at it from the opposite angle. Democratic leaders in democratic countries are capable of running torture chambers and getting away with it. I give you Exhibit A, George W. Bush. He got away with it because he contracted out the wholesale torture to other regimes in a process called ‘rendition’ – regimes like Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan and, I think even Syria might have been involved. Then there was Guantanamo.

    In other words, sadly, democratic norms and torture regimes are incompatible but they often cohabit and sometimes even stem from the same people.

    As for Hezbollah. This is a classic case of ‘One man’s terrorist is another man’s patriot’. Hezbollah was formed in southern Lebanon in the early 1980′s to defend the people from Israeli invasion and cross border aggression. They have succeeded brilliantly. They are a very large organisation with lots of support within Lebanon and are an important part of the elected Lebanese government. If you study the politics of the region it makes perfect sense for them to support Assad and vice-vera. Overall that alliance is good for progress in the region. That is my view and I don’t expect you to agree with it but things are a good deal more complex than emotive newspaper headlines would have us believe.

  10. From Tim Whewell, BBC Newsnight

    “Political activists in northern Syria have been forced to flee after attempting to defy the growing power of al-Qaeda in the region.

    “A citizens’ protest movement has been challenging the jihadist group, the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), an affiliate of al-Qaeda, after its fighters attacked churches in the city of Raqqa.

    “But activists who have fled to Turkey told BBC Newsnight that many had been arrested, beaten or kidnapped by ISIS in retaliation.

    “Raqqa, a city currently sheltering nearly a million people, is now under the full control of the group.

    “One of the activists, photographer Mezar Matar, said: “I saw many people who had signs of lashes on their bodies after being released from an ISIS prison.”

    “Mezar Matar, an activist who fled Raqqa, said his brother, Muhammed Nour, had disappeared after filming a battle in Raqqa between ISIS and a brigade loyal to the Western-backed Supreme Military Council of the Free Syrian Army (FSA).

    “Another activist, who asked not to be named for her own safety, said she and her sister, also involved in the protest movement, had fled after being fired at by ISIS gunmen.

    “Seven or eight men with explosive belts surrounded my sister. Some said: ‘Knife her.’ Some said: ‘Shoot her.’ They tore down her banner that said ‘Christians and Muslims are one’, and told her she was an infidel,” the activist said.

    “Earlier this year, Raqqa became the first provincial capital in Syria to fall fully under rebel control.

    “A statue of the late President Hafez al-Assad was toppled after Raqqa’s capture. But after only two months when control was shared by SMC-aligned [the so-called moderates] and jihadist fighters, it was taken over in May by ISIS.

    “They marked the moment by publically executing three men they said were Alawites, members of the same heterodox Shia sect as President Bashar al-Assad.

    “Now Raqqa, its population swollen by displaced families, may be the largest city in the world ever to be controlled by al-Qaeda.”

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