Ancient ice to reveal climate conditions of the distant past

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Researchers hope the discovery of ancient Antarctic ice will give them access to crucial information about carbon dioxide levels during a period when ice ages were much less frequent.

A team of scientists, including Tas van Ommen from the Hobart-based Australian Antarctic Division, say they have identified the most likely location of ice dating from 1.5 million years ago, almost double the oldest ice cores so far extracted, at 800,000 years.

In a paper published in the Climate of the Past journal, the researchers say they have narrowed down a region of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet as likely to contain the ice, possibly as much as 2.5 kilometres below the surface.

“One of the key things is that the ice will give us the carbon-dioxide levels [from that period]," Dr van Ommen said.

Written By: Peter Hannam
continue to source article at smh.com.au

6 COMMENTS

  1. Given what we already know from ice cores, I find it odd so many people deny that extreme hot climate changes, and extreme ocean level changes are possible. It is as if they argue, I would not like them, therefore they cannot happen.

    • In reply to #1 by Roedy:

      Given what we already know from ice cores, I find it odd so many people deny that extreme hot climate changes, and extreme ocean level changes are possible. It is as if they argue, I would not like them, therefore they cannot happen.

      Exactly.

      S G

      • In reply to #3 by Stafford Gordon:

        In reply to #1 by Roedy:

        Given what we already know from ice cores, I find it odd so many people deny that extreme hot climate changes, and extreme ocean level changes are possible. It is as if they argue, I would not like them, therefore they cannot happen.

        Exactly.

        S G

        Well, those tiny bubbles could have been put there by Satan, just like he did with the fossils!

        ;-)

        Steve

  2. As I understand it we are living through a period of global warming which has acceeded the parameters of all such previous period by a large margin; a terrifyingly large margin.

    Let’s hope that the evidence uncovered by this work will influence matters for the good. Although evidence doesn’t seem to be very high on the agenda of some groups.

  3. @OP – A team of scientists, including Tas van Ommen from the Hobart-based Australian Antarctic Division, say they have identified the most likely location of ice dating from 1.5 million years ago, almost double the oldest ice cores so far extracted, at 800,000 years.

    Excellent – if we can get more hard data from further back in time.

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