Another couple found guilty of murder for parenting by “To Train Up a Child”

38

Please, speak up against the abusive practices advocated in 'To Train Up a Child'. Post on Facebook and Twitter! Sign the petition asking Amazon.com to stop selling this book and encourage new parents to seek more rational resources on child rearing, such as Parenting Beyond Belief.

 

Two parents in Washington state have been found guilty of murder after allegedly following the abusive parenting techniques advocated in the parenting book "To Train Up a Child" by Michael and Debi Pearl.

Larry and Carri Williams received the maximum prison sentences allowable under the law after being found guilty of beating and starving their adopted daughter Hana to death. The methods they used to "discipline" their daughter were advocated in the controversial Christian book.

The New York Times reported:

Late one night in May this year, the adopted girl, Hana, was found face down, naked and emaciated in the backyard; her death was caused by hypothermia and malnutrition, officials determined. According to the sheriff’s report, the parents had deprived her of food for days at a time and had made her sleep in a cold barn or a closet and shower outside with a hose. And they often whipped her, leaving marks on her legs. The mother had praised the Pearls’ book and given a copy to a friend, the sheriff’s report said. Hana had been beaten the day of her death, the report said, with the 15-inch plastic tube recommended by Mr. Pearl.

Some of the discipline techniques the Pearls teach include:

Michael Pearl tells one mother on his website, "I could break his anger in two days. He would be too scared to get angry. On the third day he would draw into a quiet shell and obey."

Despite Pearl's claim that plumbing line is too light to cause damage to muscle or bone, it caused the death of seven year-old Lydia Schatz in 2010. Officials ruled that she died of severe tissue damage.

The Pearls and their ministry, No Greater Joy, make an estimated $1.7 million a year.

 

Written By: Alicia Bayer
continue to source article at examiner.com

38 COMMENTS

  1. Don´t Pearls (what a misnomer!) also tell in their book that if a boy child is beaten by other children or youth, parents should “rejoice” because otherwise victim of violence becomes a “sissy”? And Debi´s advices to Christian wives include a “pearl” that the wife cannot say no to sex, because “Don´t tell me it hurts, he is a man”?

  2. Saw an interview / report with the Pearls at their home, on CNN with Wolf B.

    My summation: Mr. Pearl is one messed up mother fkr, and, can’t tell what the hell is up with the missus. Under his control, I would presume (body language).

    controversial Christian book

    Now that’s a book worthy of a ban/fire pit. Smiling child on the cover – talk about false advertising.

  3. When it’s this bad I suspect what some may get from the book initially isn’t so much instruction as affirmation. Maybe they start to abuse their child and then find this book when they go looking for help. It’s possible at least that some of them would have been open to receiving help for themselves prior to reading the “how to” of abusing children and finding justification for their actions rather than condemnation.

  4. With three child deaths (at least) now directly attributable to this poisonous book, when might we expect criminal charges to be brought against Michael and Debi Pearl for incitement to murder?

    • In reply to #4 by Stevehill:

      With three child deaths (at least) now directly attributable to this poisonous book, when might we expect criminal charges to be brought against Michael and Debi Pearl for incitement to murder?

      Good question. The “freedom of speech” argument doesn’t apply to – for example – manuals on bomb making the Al Qaida way, or I suppose DIY manuals on arson or making sarin gas. These, I expect, would be illegal in themselves.

      Also, some of the details in the book (as gleaned from reviews on Amazon) would appear to be confessions of criminal activity, for which the authors could be prosecuted. Anyone up for a class action? It would be a public good to deprive the authors of the means to make further mischief, and punitive damages could just be the way.

    • In reply to #5 by aquilacane:

      I’m writing a book—”To Train Up Michael & Debi Pearl” Because they are much bigger than a child, you need an aluminum bat but it’s basically the same.

      As for your “book”, there are probably some beefy inmates who already know its methods, and who hate child abusers!

      @OP – Two parents in Washington state have been found guilty of murder after allegedly following the abusive parenting techniques advocated in the parenting book “To Train Up a Child” by Michael and Debi Pearl.

      Larry and Carri Williams received the maximum prison sentences allowable under the law

      I suspect that Larry and Carri Williams are going to get some “obedience training” in prison.

  5. They make the Taliban look like saints. In a way, it’s almost a leveller for our prejudices to know that western society is every bit as bat-shit crazy as the crazies in Islam and that we need to get our own house in order.
    The thing that I find puzzling is, how does US law manage to tolerate this book and the proselytising of this evil culture, which is plainly an incitement to child harm, torture and even murder? Surely the blessed First Amendment can’t be used to condone such filth. Could this be tolerated under UK or any other European law? You’d hope not.

  6. I’m not really into banning books. Plus there are three thousand thoughtful negative reviews on Amazon that I would hate to see disappear.

    If the Richard Dawkins Foundation wants to do sometime of monumental importance, it would start working to ban corporal punishment in USA school, not just talk about it.

    • LindaRosaRN,
      I am very interested in your statement regarding the banning of corporal punishment in schools. I am under the impression that every school has autonomy when it comes to corporal punishment and that the community that the school is located within determines the acceptability of the practice.

      BTW, I am completely with you on eliminating corporal punishment from schools. I have worked in Pa schools for 18 years and none of the schools I am familiar with practice this. I was wondering if you had info regarding where this occurs and what the practices are. Any info i have found on google is lots of hearsay and anecdote.

      I visualize this as a rural or even “Southern state” issue, and since I am in neither situation, I’d be eager to learn about the situation faced by kids for whom you are advocating. I’d be glad to join your fight and would read (with interest) any resources you could recommend.

      In reply to #10 by LindaRosaRN:

      I’m not really into banning books. Plus there are three thousand thoughtful negative reviews on Amazon that I would hate to see disappear.

      If the Richard Dawkins Foundation wants to do sometime of monumental importance, it would start working to ban corporal punishment in USA school, not just talk…

      • In reply to #16 by crookedshoes:

        LindaRosaRN, I am very interested in your statement regarding the banning of corporal punishment in schools. [...]

        [...] I was wondering if you had info regarding where this occurs and what the practices are. Any info i have found on google is lots of hearsay and anecdote.

        The Center for Effective Discipline seems to have some fairly decent information.

        According to Wikipedia:

        Individual US states have the power to ban corporal punishment in their schools. Currently, it is banned in public schools in 31 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. In two of these states, New Jersey and Iowa, it is illegal in private schools as well. The 19 states that have not banned it are mostly in the South. It is still used to a significant (though declining) degree in some public schools in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas.

        In 1867 New Jersey became the first U.S. state to abolish corporal punishment in schools. The second was Massachusetts 104 years later in 1971. The most recent state to outlaw school corporal punishment was New Mexico in 2011.

        Private schools in every state but New Jersey and Iowa are exempt from state bans and may choose to use the paddle. Here too, most of those which actually do so are to be found in Southern states. These are largely, but by no means exclusively, Christian evangelical or fundamentalist schools.

        Most urban public school systems, even in states where it is permitted, have abolished corporal punishment. Statistics collected by the federal government show that the use of the paddle has been declining consistently, in all states where it is used, over at least the past 20 years. The anti-spanking campaign Center for Effective Discipline, extrapolating from federal statistics, estimates that the number of students spanked or paddled in 2006 in U.S. public schools was about 223,000.

        Apparently minority and disabled students are far more likely to be hit in school by an educator than are their peers, and about 80% of the time the victim is a boy.

    • In reply to #10 by LindaRosaRN:

      I’m not really into banning books. Plus there are three thousand thoughtful negative reviews on Amazon that I would hate to see disappear.

      If the Richard Dawkins Foundation wants to do sometime of monumental importance, it would start working to ban corporal punishment in USA school, not just talk…

      Corporal punishment is allowed in USA schools? Seriously! WOW!

    • In reply to #10 by LindaRosaRN:

      I’m not really into banning books. Plus there are three thousand thoughtful negative reviews on Amazon that I would hate to see disappear.

      If the Richard Dawkins Foundation wants to do sometime of monumental importance, it would start working to ban corporal punishment in USA school, not just talk.

      Uhhh, Here in the USA we haven’t had corporal punishment in decades. …..And Richard Dawkins doesn’t just talk………

    • In reply to #10 by LindaRosaRN:

      If the Richard Dawkins Foundation wants to do sometime of monumental importance, it would start working to ban corporal punishment in USA school, not just talk…

      You mean it is not banned already?

      It’s been banned in UK state schools since 1986 and in private schools since 1998. Britain was the last European country to introduce a comprehensive ban.

      16 European countries now ban hitting a child under any circumstances, in any way (including spanking by a parent) and another seven countries have similar legislation in progress. Such legislation, in Germany, recently allowed the authorities to take into care 40 children being systematically abused by the Twelve Tribes Christian sect (a group with views and practices the Pearls would be proud of).

      The simple solution, in America, would seem to be to recognise that children are – you know – human beings, and they have the right to be protected from common assault, by law.

      America remains one of two nations not to have adopted the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. If I were American, I would be asking why not. The only other country not to sign up is Somalia.

  7. I once went into Powell’s bookstore in Portland Oregon. They had a room dedicated to How-To crimes. How to break into cars. How to kill your wife and get away with it. I had never seen anything like it. I have certainly read murder mysteries, and seen the Dexter series, which could be interpreted as how to kill and get away with it.

    I do not understand the law. Here in Canada, I was arrested for writing a book advocating gays come out and have sex (which was newly legal). I have seen people prosecuted for advocating birth control. I have seen people prosecuted for advocating suicide of a terminally ill person. So there seems to be vague principle that counselling a crime is itself a crime.

    However, priests can call for stoning gays to death, without fear of reprisal. Michael and Debi Pearl can advocate child abuse without interference. Maybe Anonymous could go after them. The irony is, if the Pearl’s book were on how to train cats, they would be skinned alive. What they need is empathy, gained by experiencing what they advocate for others.

    • In reply to #11 by Roedy:

      …can advocate child abuse without interference

      His spin is ‘spare the rod, spoil the child’. “Your honor, we are just following gods’ biblical law”.

      ‘To Put Down a P***k’

  8. I checked, and was disgusted to find it is being sold in the UK, although only as a Kindle edition, not in paper form

    I’d like to suggest that everyone goes to their country’s Amazon website and puts up negative review.
    The reviews on Amazon US are almost evenly split between 1 star ratings, and (unbelievably) 5 stars

    • In reply to #12 by N_Ellis:

      The reviews on Amazon US are almost evenly split between 1 star ratings, and (u.

      The top ranking 5 star review is satirical, and is in fact a strongly negative review. So when Amazon posts its side-by-side “best and worst” (whatever they call it), both reviews shown are strongly negative. Which I think is clever, so I voted up the satirical 5-star review.

      There are possibly other genuine positive reviews in there, I didn’t read that far.

  9. Just had a look at Amazon UK. Yep the book is there. It has 298 1-star reviews, largely from irate people calling for the book to be banned. There are also 16 5-star reviews, the majority of which are from irate people calling for the book to be banned – they gave 5 stars purely to highlight their comments, some of which link to petitions to get the book banned. There were a few token loons claiming that it’s a good book, but these were an insignificant minority.

    Amazon does provide the facility to have a peek in the book without purchase, and from a brief scan of a few pages, the book looks to be everything it’s purported to be. The Intro describes the Pearls’ technique as “…the same principles the Amish use to train their stubborn mules.”

    Another part advocates training an infant not to reach for your glasses, by placing them within his reach as “bait”. When he reaches for them, the book instructs the reader to “thump or swat his hand with a light object so as to cause him a little pain, but not necessarily enough to cry”.

    I am completely dumbfounded. There are so, so many things wrong with this book, these people…

    • In reply to #13 by Stew282:

      Another part advocates training an infant not to reach for your glasses, by placing them within his reach as “bait”.

      Ah, the “fruit in the garden” method. The old ways are the best ways, eh?

  10. The scary part: 625,000 in print.

    This book is telling people god approves of you beating your kid senseless in imaginative ways. You are pissed, go with it.

    These people must be stopped. Where do they live?

    Some people could buy the book thinking it is a legit book about raising kids, and would burn it in horror.

    Are there any affected kids old enough now to sue their parents and the Pearl’s? Most people on a jury would want to punish the Pearls the max.

    I wonder what child services would do a with a list of all people who bought that book.

  11. The Pearls and their ministry, No Greater Joy, make an estimated $1.7 million a year.

    The Pearls should be fined 1.8 million dollars a year for the poison they have manufactured.

    Oh and BTW, they make that 1.7 TAX FREE.

  12. How about indicting Michael and Debi Pearl as co-conspirators to multiple murder? The crimes against children that these two advocate make Charles Manson’s grooming of girls to commit murder for him almost look quaint.

    I’ve put up a scathing review on Amazon and asked them to stop selling this criminal how-to manual. I’ve never been one for banning or burning books, but for this fly-blown piece of shit, I’d gladly pour on the gasoline and light the match.

  13. I couldn’t read the whole article. I lost my son in a motorbike accident earlier this year and would give anything to have him back. So to see people treat a child in this way and cause her death, makes me angry beyond my vocabulary to describe

    It almost makes me wish there was a Hell, so they could spend eternity in it

    • In reply to #25 by rtfa:

      @ “rtfa”

      Quote :

      “why aren’t the authors jailed?”

      Appeals to my sentiment as well.

      There’s a nasty little obstacle called the 1st Amendment standing in the way. Can’t be “jailed” for being a bad author, or being insane, for that matter, unless it is proven that you are acting out a clear intent to do harm to others.

      If you’re a bright lawyer with motivation (and money), this could be one approach. Perhaps a class action brought on by some PTA or parents’ committee…The book could be viewed as inciting/soliciting to do harm to children. I would go that route, but I’m too smart to be a lawyer…

      The good news is that it seems that the majority of the literate public are rejecting the …uh…”book”… by dint of wholesale sanction.

      It’s the noisy minority we have to deal with, along with the abusers and murderers.

      J.B.

      why aren’t the authors jailed?

  14. The authors claim that a child must be “trained” (beaten) into absolute and immediate obedience. There was a passage somewhere in the preview claiming that, if you failed to “train” your child when young, it would be too late by the time he or she grew up.

    Presumably, if parents fail to “train” a child correctly, they’ve only themselves to blame when they have to stone him to death as a teenager.

  15. I don’t see how this book can be banned unless it has pedophile material in it.
    I think banning it would gain it even more credibility in the eyes of these crazies!

    I have no children of my own, but I think the best way to raise children is to raise them in an environment that’s completely free
    from fiction, whether its in a book or media device.
    If I had kids, I would outright get rid of the T.V, computer, consoles, media players, cell phones, comic books, novels etc etc,

    until they are at least 16 years old.

    P.S. The cover of the book reminded how important it is not to judge a book by its cover.
    A beautifully smiling boy toddler… yeah right!

    • In reply to #31 by Terra Watt:

      @ “Terra Watt”

      Quote :

      “I think the best way to raise children is to raise them in an environment that’s completely free from fiction, whether its in a book or media device. If I had kids, I would outright get rid of the T.V, computer, consoles, media players, cell phones, comic books, novels etc etc, until they are at least 16 years old.”

      Sorry “Terra”, your formula could not possibly work. Even with the option of “home schooling” (a euphemism for parental brainwashing, as opposed to public school brainwashing), if you’re a responsible parent, you’re not going to cloister your kids until they are 16.

      What ?

      You’re going to “hide” them from friends, their peers, even your own relations ?

      Don’t think so.

      That would also constitute a form of abuse. Big time abuse, really.

      Unless your family lives in a space station, you will have to be a guiding light for your kids, not a control freak. Someday they will have to cope in a world they were born into, and neither your fingers nor mine are pushing all the buttons on the control panel.

      There is no control panel, really, and whether that’s good or bad, that’s for another blog.

      J.B.

      I don’t see how this book can be banned unless it has pedophile material in it.
      I think banning it would gain it even more credibility in the eyes of these crazies!

      I have no children of my own, but I think the best way to raise children is to raise them in an environment that’s completely free
      fro…

  16. It’s the motives that get me. Clearly these rules and punishments are clearly designed with a child’s obedience as the highest priority above genuine learning directly from their mistakes. They want parents to be the object of fear to their children, and it’s frightening how this parallels with how religions treat its subjects when they have the casting vote. Forced obedience to feed one’s massive ego and also to shirk putting in real effort into a child’s upbringing.

  17. This pathological need for control is surely the sign of mental problems. I can see the next book coming from this man.

    As this loon points out, we only need kill a few kids pour encourager les autres.

    The sweet cover will have to go from the next edition of the Pearls book. Something a little more deterrent…an open grave, perhaps.

    Surely there are some good marks-free tortures? Waterboarding from the Baptists? Hell, of course, and sodomy from the RCC…

    • In reply to #34 by phil rimmer:

      @ “phil rimmer”

      Quote :

      “This pathological need for control is surely the sign of mental problems.”

      It most certainly is. The name for it is :

      BAD.

      I sometimes muse that the acronym is not an accident, but it is.

      Bipolar Affective Disorder.

      A pandemic in this side of the world (U.S. of A.), unacknowledged by both CDC and the media.

      In religious fanatics, the disorder manifests itself by its most common psychotic features : religiosity, of course, delusions of grandiosity, as in having the final word on just about anything in life, delusions of self-importance (usually not vocalized, unless pushed), and very often accompanied with overlapping personality syndromes such as OCD and simple narcissistic personality traits.

      This pretty well fits the modus operandi of any other type of fanatic as well.

      J.B.

      This pathological need for control is surely the sign of mental problems. I can see the next book coming from this man.

      As this loon points out, we only need kill a few kids pour encourager les autres.

      The sweet cover will have to go from the next edition of the Pearls book. Something a little mor…

  18. A cheeky comment I throw out from time to time in conversation; “There are TWO people in this world that cannot pontificate this next comment…I know I’m smarter that a lot of people in this world, but there are a lot of people in this world who are a whole lot smarter than me”. Well I need to revise this comment from TWO to THREE, because Micheal & Debi Pearl are possibly the two dumbest people on the planet. Hats off to the smartest person in the world whoever you are!!

    • In reply to #37 by gongdom:

      @ “gongdom”

      Quote :

      “Micheal & Debi Pearl are possibly the two dumbest people on the planet”

      …Well I wish it were that simple; the fact that they are most likely pretty stupid stands moot, because they are also very dangerous and sick.

      And accordingly, with all due dispatch, they publish this book, pretending to be “child counselors”, when in fact they are clearly, and feverishly, pushing their dangerous religious tripe on even the more clueless.

      It is also dangerous to underestimate the intellect of your typical fanatic; they are not really “dumb”, and they bear the bite of a willful beast. I would prefer to think on them as a sub-species, but this would be as foolhardy as to think on them as “dumb”.

      Their agenda is not about the abuse they advocate against children.

      Religious fervor trumps any appeal to reason and civility. It always has.

      The propaganda machine is served, and that is what they want.

      J.B.

      A cheeky comment I throw out from time to time in conversation; “There are TWO people in this world that cannot pontificate this next comment…I know I’m smarter that a lot of people in this world, but there are a lot of people in this world who are a whole lot smarter than me”. Well I need to revi…

Leave a Reply