Child brides at funerals

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Young maternal age and quick pregnancies linked to high infant mortality in South Asia

Having children early and in rapid succession are major factors fueling high infant mortality rates in the South Asian countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan where one in 14 births to young mothers ends with the death of the child within the first year, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

Writing in the current online issue of the International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Anita Raj, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the Center on Gender Equity and Health at UC San Diego, and colleagues said younger maternal age (under 18 years old) and short intervals between pregnancies (under 24 months) accounted for roughly one-quarter of the infant mortality rate among young mothers in India and Pakistan, a percentage that represents almost 200,000 infant deaths in 2012 for those two nations alone.

In Bangladesh, only the short inter-pregnancy interval was linked to infant mortality while in Nepal, only young motherhood was associated with infant death.

Written By: UC San Diego
continue to source article at eurekalert.org

6 COMMENTS

  1. It’s bad enough that children should be forced into marriage and the concomitant woes in this society.Having and then losing a child adds to this cocktail of misery.Poor mites.

  2. “She and colleagues reported that more than 10 million girls under the age of 19 marry each year worldwide, usually under the force of local tradition and social custom. Almost half of these compulsory marriages occur in South Asia.”

    This is the closest the article comes to even dare mentioning religion as a factor and the only mention at all of the cause of this scourge. Moreover, the ludicrous, obnoxious, persistent use of terms like “marriage” and “brides,” as if that’s really what we’re talking about, euphimizes what is in effect religiously/socially/culturally/institutionally sanctioned human trafficking, kidnapping, sexual slavery, false imprisonment, child rape, sexual abuse, pedophilia, forced childhood labour, coerced pregnancy, coerced motherhood, coerced withholding of education and involuntary manslaughter.

    Another word for all of which is Crime. The perpetrators of which are criminals. The enablers of and accomplices to which are the purveyors of political correctness, cultural/moral relativists hidebound to “respect” and not “offend” beliefs, customs and practices regardless of their depravity and criminality.

    How many godsdamned more “studies” is it going to take to see, admit and state the obvious?

    • In reply to #3 by godsbuster:

      the persistent use of terms like “marriage” and “brides,” as if that’s really what we’re talking about, euphimizes what is in effect religiously/socially/culturally/institutionally sanctioned human trafficking, kidnapping, sexual slavery,…….

      This is an excellent point. Like the universal adoption of female genital mutilation instead of the bland term circumcision, we should start to pressure reporters and editors to adopt more honest terms. Putting the words in scare quotes is actually a good start.

      • In reply to #4 by phil rimmer:

        In reply to #3 by godsbuster:

        Like the universal adoption of female genital mutilation instead of the bland term circumcision,

        I’ve ranted elsewhere against precisely that other example of abusing language for the purpose of obfuscation: swaddling the male version of genital mutilation in a medicalized term – circumcision – to lend that practice the aura of legitimacy where it has little to none.

        Pressuring reporters and editors would be ideal but it evokes images of Don Quixote and windmills because we’d be up against that whole magnum edifice of political correctness and cultural relativism which appears to be festering everywhere. Perhaps more realistic and practical as a start would be being rigourous, consistent and persistent in our own use of language as individuals. Even that no small feat considering the fecal storm that erupts every time e.g. the FGM vs MGM (in my opinion false) dichotomy is brought up.

  3. Criticising the Child Marriage (Prevention) Act, which made marriage of girls below the age 18 an offence, speakers at the meeting said the law violated religious rights of the Muslim community since the Muslim personal law did not specify the age for marriage of girls in the community.
    “The constitutional protection enjoyed by the Muslim community should not be diluted or taken away. The Muslim personal law does not prohibit marriage of girls below the age 18,” Mr. Mundupara said.

    Source: Muslim groups oppose ban on child marriage

    Outraged clerics who have pledged to fight for legitimacy say underage marriages are not common but sometimes inevitable. “We are not promoting underage marriages,” says Musthafa Mundupara, who is with Samastha Kerala Jamiyyathul Ulema and is general secretary of the state coordination committee for the protection of Muslim personal law. “But certain situations may demand such marriages. The Shariah law allows Muslim girls to marry when they attain puberty.”

    Source: Underage marriage among Muslims in Kerala ignites debate

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