Christianity at risk of dying out in a generation, warns Lord Carey

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Christianity is just a “generation away from extinction” in Britain unless churches make a dramatic breakthrough in attracting young people back to the faith, the former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey has warned.

Clergy are now gripped by a “feeling of defeat”, congregations are worn down by “heaviness” while the public simply greets both with “rolled eyes and a yawn of boredom”, he said.

His comments at a Christian conference came as a stark report laid before the Church of England’s General Synod warned that its position as a “national institution” will be in doubt if numbers in the pews drop much further.

The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, also underlined the scale of the crisis telling members of the Synod they must “evangelise or fossilise”.

 
 

Written By: John Bingham
continue to source article at telegraph.co.uk

75 COMMENTS

  1. I’ll be happy to join whatever denomination you represent…

    …except that there’s this one pesky little thing I want from you first: evidence for a god. I hope it’s not too big of a hassle for you to arrange.

  2. I’ll be happy to join whatever denomination you represent…

    …except that there’s this one pesky little thing I want from you first: evidence for a god. I hope it’s not too big of a hassle for you to arrange.

      • In reply to #53 by tejas_gokhale01:

        In reply to #5 by Stafford Gordon:

        Christianity is just a “generation away from extinction”… Oh goody!

        Thats just one down. So many more to go!

        The Methodists look set to go extinct much quicker, with the Presbyterians perhaps not that far behind.

        The Baptists seem to declining on a far less steep rate currently though I suspect that has to do with the particular groups (vulnerable adults) that they are exploiting.

  3. OP

    Archbishop Sentamu told the Synod: “Compared with evangelism everything else is like rearranging furniture when the house is on fire.

    Compared with the burning of heretics, just a few centuries ago, the CoE is just a smouldering damp bonfire in the late November chill.

    • In reply to #7 by shamenless:

      We wish the same could be said about the religion of peace!

      Yes indeed- a vacuum awaiting filling? Islam is so much superior at indoctrination and reinforcement of same. Very worrying.

      • In reply to #55 by Fritz:

        In reply to #7 by shamenless:

        We wish the same could be said about the religion of peace!

        Yes indeed- a vacuum awaiting filling? Islam is so much superior at indoctrination and reinforcement of same. Very worrying.

        The one who pokes at the white elephant gets stoned!!
        I think there’s a natural selection at work in religion of peace. Only those who peacefully agree to the myth get to live lol

  4. Congratulations Britain or England, you are just one generation away from being free from a potential theocracy!
    That said be on the alert for the rise of Islam.
    It would be a shame to fall victim to yet another theocracy.

    • In reply to #10 by Terra Watt:

      Congratulations Britain or England, you are just one generation away from being free from a potential theocracy!
      That said be on the alert for the rise of Islam.
      It would be a shame to fall victim to yet another theocracy.

      Muslims are about 4% of us. I’ve lived with and worked with a lot of them, and many of them are about as devout as I am.

      I don’t much care if Islam ends up the last religion standing in the UK (I’ll just cheer the demise of the rest), Islam will still be a tiny minority and the rest of us will never allow it any dominion over us as long as we remain a democracy. It’s a red herring.

      A few noisy, newsworthy hotheads do not represent Muslims.

      A largely un-Christian, secular UK will make it even harder for them to avoid challenging their own faith and its merits.

      • In reply to #28 by Stevehill:

        In reply to #10 by Terra Watt:

        Muslims are about 4% of us. I’ve lived with…A largely un-Christian, secular UK will make it even harder for them to avoid challenging their own faith and its merits.

        I hope you are right!

        • In reply to #35 by Terra Watt:

          In reply to #28 by Stevehill:

          In reply to #10 by Terra Watt:

          Muslims are about 4% of us. I’ve lived with…A largely un-Christian, secular UK will make it even harder for them to avoid challenging their own faith and its merits.

          I hope you are right!

          Accurate figures for attendance of mosques does not seem to exist, however there are about 1600 mosques registered in Britain, therefore to achieve parity with the 800,000 Anglicans, the average mosque would need to be seeing around 5000 muslims every Friday.

          With the death threats to muslim apostates, estimates of mosque going varies wildly from 25% upwards, (some published statistics seem to require more than 100% of muslims attending mosques) In my experience 2nd generation immigrants tend to stop going to mosque shortly after leaving home.

  5. Typical Sunday congregations have almost halved since 1970 to just 807,000 in the most recent figures.

    Archbishop Sentamu told the Synod: “Compared with evangelism everything else is like rearranging furniture when the house is on fire.

    “Tragically too often that is what we are doing – reorganising the structures, arguing over words and phrases, while the people of England are are left floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair.”

    MMMmmmmm – 807,000 “joyous Xtians” regularly in church according to the most recent figures while over 500,000+ supporters regularly attend Premier League football clubs and the millions of other non-church-goers are left floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair.” (allegedly!) – Don’t theists love psychological projection!!!
    http://www.worldfootball.net/attendance/eng-premier-league-2012-2013/1/

    I wonder if a rise in football popularity and a further drop in church attendance, could have an “established sport” replace the “established church.”

    Could this be an early sign??

    http://www.royalcentral.co.uk/cambridges/prince-william-to-host-buckingham-palaces-first-football-match-15475#.UovD2ScUtPY

    Prince William is to host Buckingham Palace’s first football match to celebrate the Football Association’s 150th birthday.
    The Duke of Cambridge, president of the FA, is planning to use the Queen’s back lawns for the match

    (Just kiddin’)

    • In reply to #11 by Alan4discussion:

      Typical Sunday congregations have almost halved since 1970 to just 807,000 in the most recent figures.

      Archbishop Sentamu told the Synod: “Compared with evangelism everything else is like rearranging furniture when the house is on fire.

      “Tragically too often that is what we are doing – reorganisin…

      Frank Lampard is God!

  6. Y’all just need to learn how we ‘Mericans spread the Faith to childrens. Get ready for Twerking for Christ! The Power Team 2.0! All y’all gotta do is shake some booties and smash bricks with your head. That’ll get ‘em kneelin’.

    “The last Christian died on the cross.”-Nietzsche

    • In reply to #12 by This Is Not A Meme:

      Y’all just need to learn how we ‘Mericans spread the Faith to childrens. Get ready for Twerking for Christ! The Power Team 2.0! All y’all gotta do is shake some booties and smash bricks with your head. That’ll get ‘em kneelin’.”The last Christian died on the cross.”-Nietzsche

      I like the quote, but Friedrich was a bit of a cynic don’t you think?

      S G

      • In reply to #13 by Stafford Gordon:

        In reply to #12 by This Is Not A Meme:

        Y’all just need to learn how we ‘Mericans spread the Faith to childrens. Get ready for Twerking for Christ! The Power Team 2.0! All y’all gotta do is shake some booties and smash bricks with your head. That’ll get ‘em kneelin’.”The last Christian died on the cross…

        I like the quote, but Friedrich was a bit of a cynic don’t you think?

        Or a bit of an optimist depending on one’s point of view.

        • In reply to #62 by NearlyNakedApe:

          In reply to #13 by Stafford Gordon:

          In reply to #12 by This Is Not A Meme:

          Y’all just need to learn how we ‘Mericans spread the Faith to childrens. Get ready for Twerking for Christ! The Power Team 2.0! All y’all gotta do is shake some booties and smash bricks with your head. That’ll get ‘em kneel…

          The actual quote from Nietzsche (from The Antichrist Aphorism 39) is

          “The very word ‘Christianity’ is a misunderstanding–at bottom there was only one Christian, and he died on the cross. “

          Interpreting Nietzsche is not an exact science but I think what he meant there is that the dogma of Catholicism and Christianity came later and were nothing like what the historical Jewish teacher Jesus of Nazareth actually believed and preached. It’s similar to the analysis in the recent Reza Aslan book about Jesus called Zealot, that Jesus didn’t preach eternal damnation or that he was the son of God but rather thought of himself as an earthly messiah who was going to lead a revolt of the Jews to take back political power from Rome.

    • In reply to #12 by This Is Not A Meme:

      Y’all just need to learn how we ‘Mericans spread the Faith to childrens. Get ready for Twerking for Christ! The Power Team 2.0! All y’all gotta do is shake some booties and smash bricks with your head. That’ll get ‘em kneelin’.

      If all they do is dance and sing, they are not going to have time to teach them to kill gays, or engage in other anti-social behaviour.

  7. Christianity wiped out in a generation? Unlikely I feel. My experiences with red spider mites and mealy bugs in the greenhouse suggest that there are some pests that are persistent buggers. Keeping them from doing too much damage and keeping numbers down with a natural predator (I suggest a tiger) may be our best bet. No effective sprays have been developed, though environmentally friendly reason may have some limited effect.

  8. Oh waily, waily, waily. It’s almost funny watching these people bemoan the passing of their pet superstitions as though the country was about to explode without them. Dude, it’s just a religion. It’s not like it’s anything important.

    Christianity at risk of dying out in a generation

    I doubt it somehow, but either way, meh. It would be nice to see religion as a whole become history within a generation, but if only history itself were that fast.

  9. “We have to give cogent reasons to young people why the Christian faith is relevant to them.”
    And those cogent reasons are?

    while the people of England are left floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair.”

    Help help I’m floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair, I need bronze age fairytales,a jew on a stick and one up the bum!!!!

    • @OP – “We have to give cogent reasons to young people why the Christian faith is relevant to them.”

      Two challenges there then!
      First to learn how to reason, and then work out how the Hell he is going to find anything remotely “reasonable” in Xtian faith, that is relevant to young people in a modern country !

  10. The maths point that way yes.
    The average age of the congregation is approximately 7 years from life expectancy, That means there has been no significant numbers of fresh church-goers for the last 3 generations.

    As such as the people in the pews now are dying off and not being replaced meaning that the number of members the church has, show a quarter-life of around 7 years (ie; in 7 years the number of church-goers will have fallen by around 25%) and over that time the average age will have crept closer to life expectancy. As such the average age of church-goers will equal life expectancy within about 20 years, at which point the church goes into free-fall.

    Rowan Williams tried to change the church’s course but was ultimately defeated by the Laity and thus whilst it may be theoretically possible for the church to turn things around, for practical purposes I suspect the point of no return has already been passed.
    Financially the position of the church is a time bomb as they have held onto church buildings far longer than they can support them by income generated by the congregation, and this is exacerbated by closing smaller parish churches and falling back on the absurd white elephants of the cathedrals due to their iconic status.

    The British Government moves monolithically slowly so I suspect that at least 1, probably 2 general elections will be fought following the church becoming non-viable, before it is disestablished. So about 30 years.

    I will point out that by “Christianity” he refers to the CofE.

    • In reply to #23 by Mr Greene:

      The maths point that way yes.

      I once went to an enormous stone Baptist church sitting on some very valuable downtown real estate. The young preacher excoriated about 5 elderly women the front row for their unforgivable sins. There was no one else present. The old ladies appeared to enjoy the verbal whipping. I asked the preacher how they could afford such a huge building with such a small congregation. He said they had so many savings, they could afford to run it without any congregation indefinitely.

      I suspect many CoE will be in a similar position, with this last generation dying and bequeathing their estates to the church. They have no taxes and since the building is so rarely used, no heat either.

      • In reply to #43 by Roedy:

        In reply to #23 by Mr Greene:

        The maths point that way yes.

        I once went to an enormous stone Baptist church sitting on some very valuable downtown real estate. The young preacher excoriated about 5 elderly women the front row for their unforgivable sins. There was no one else present. The old la…

        That doesn’t seem to be the case as the parish churches are being closed down and amalgamated, and the process is accelerating.

        http://www.whychurch.org.uk/num_churches.php
        Take these stats with a pinch of salt, the church seems to play fast and loose with figures, though we do seem to be moving towards some sort of spike in church closures.
        The coffers of the CofE are an unknown factor, but there are plenty of signs that all isn’t well financially.

      • In reply to #43 by Roedy:

        “I suspect many CoE will be in a similar position, with this last generation dying and bequeathing their estates to the church. They have no taxes and since the building is so rarely used, no heat either.”

        The CofE would love to be in such a position, but it is not. Most of the Grade 1 listed buildings in my county are CofE churches, which mean they cannot practically be used for much else and they carry a huge maintenance bill to preserve them exactly as they are forever, under pain of severe penalties if they do not!

        Public appeals to help maintain these churches are widespread and incessant. (And I sometimes donate – the buildings are worth preserving).

        Last time I looked at the CofE accounts they had about £5 billion. It’s a lot, but not all that much.

    • In reply to #24 by aldous:

      Nothing for religious people to worry about. Islam will fill the gap. There are more Muslims on the prayer carpet than Anglicans on the wooden benches, are there not?

      No, Muslims are a tiny minority by comparison. Whilst their numbers are growing and the church is collapsing it is unlikely that Islam will amount to anything more than a fringe group. Their youth are abandoning the mosques as readily as christian children.

    • In reply to #24 by aldous:

      Nothing for religious people to worry about. Islam will fill the gap. There are more Muslims on the prayer carpet than Anglicans on the wooden benches, are there not?

      Globally, yes. In the UK, no. More Christians attend a weekly service than there are people who regularly attend mosques. For the time being.

      • In reply to #29 by Stevehill:

        More Christians attend a weekly service than there are people who regularly attend mosques.

        The variety of Christianity being discussed is Anglicanism. Allegedly, there are more Muslim worshippers in mosques than Anglicans in church. If this is anything like true, what is the justification for maintaining the CofE as the national church with all the privileges that that entails?

        Figures compiled from government and academic sources show that 930,000 Muslims attend a place of worship at least once a week, compared with 916,000 Anglicans.
        Muslims outpace Anglicans in UK
        The Sunday Times (UK) | 1/25/04 | Nicholas Hellen

        • In reply to #38 by aldous:

          In reply to #29 by Stevehill:

          More Christians attend a weekly service than there are people who regularly attend mosques.

          The variety of Christianity being discussed is Anglicanism. Allegedly, there are more Muslim worshippers in mosques than Anglicans in church. If this is anything like true, wh…

          The reason is because an MP would have to propose the motion to remove the bishops from the House of Lords. Currently that is political suicide, which is why I estimate the second parliament after average congregation age equals life expectancy.

          • In reply to #40 by Mr Greene:

            But if there are more Muslim worshippers then Anglican worshippers, what basis is there for maintaining the status of Anglicanism as the national religion when it plainly isn’t? It’s an anachronism. There are, therefore, grounds for opposing its privileged position in society. That’s the principle. How you put it into practice is another question.

          • In reply to #41 by aldous:

            In reply to #40 by Mr Greene:

            In reply to #38 by aldous:

            But if there are more Muslim worshippers then Anglican worshippers, what basis is there for maintaining the status of Anglicanism as the national religion when it plainly isn’t? It’s an anachronism. There are, therefore, grounds for opposing…

            That’s a big if, you quote the Times saying 930,000 practising muslims, whilst the Mail and Express quote a figure of around 600,000.
            Thus far I have seen little to persuade me of the reliability of those figures.
            In either case the church blatantly hasn’t been the centre of British life for 70+ years. The Muslim population is irrelevant.

            The bishops have sat in the Lords for centuries and attempting to invent a rational basis for them is folly.
            Unfortunately the geriatrics that populate the pews tend to be the group most likely to vote so politicians pander to them.
            Of course a secular state sounds fantastic, though I fear we will face irrational people driven to desperation before then.

        • In reply to #38 by aldous:

          Assuming there is something like parity between Anglican and Muslim church attendances, there is no basis at all for preserving the CofE as the established church (if ever there was).

          If we do NOT disestablish, probably quite soon, we will be somewhat exposed to Muslim demands that they too should be entitled to 26 placemen in the House of Lords as of right.

  11. To think boredom is keeping the pundits away is such a massive denial of the real problem. No one believes anymore, that is a problem they have no way back from, of course that is too big a problem to admitt to.

  12. Lord Carey is such a wishful thinker. The only breakthrough would be if the churches said they were wrong about God, like they were wrong about the Earth being in the center on the Universe, or that humans came from two people, or the flood , or…

    • In reply to #32 by A3Kr0n:

      Lord Carey is such a wishful thinker. The only breakthrough would be if the churches said they were wrong about God, like they were wrong about the Earth being in the center on the Universe, or that humans came from two people, or the flood , or…

      Don’t agree. For all their words of the hereafter religions are primarily about the earthly acquisition of power and money. They won’t have much of either if their numbers continue to fall like this. This reallly is a note of panic.

      The last card hand they hold is faith schools which often perform better than secular schools for the simple reason that they are allowed to pick and choose who they let in. Many of these schools are oversubscribed and the only way parents are allowed to send their kids there is if they regularly attend church. Probably a significant number of those attending church are middle class atheists or agnostics fidgeting on the back pew for an hour a week for the sake of their kids future.
      If the funding arrangements for these schools were changed the church of England would all but disappear.

  13. >
    Christianity is just a “generation away from extinction” in Britain unless churches make a dramatic breakthrough in attracting young people back to the faith, the former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey has warned.

    So Carey thinks the only true christians are C of E christians! What does he think that makes the members of other cults?

    >
    The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, also underlined the scale of the crisis telling members of the Synod they must “evangelise or fossilise”.

    A bit late, methinks. By about 1500 years by my reckoning.

    >
    He called for an ambitious campaign aimed at the “re-evangelisation of England”, on a par with the ministry of the northern saints such as Cuthbert, Hilda and Aidan who spread Christianity in Anglo-Saxon times.

    Yep, 1500 years!

    >
    “In many parts of Britain churches are struggling, some priests are diffident and lack confidence; a feeling of defeat is around.

    I suspect much of the problem is a lack of belief in the great sky fairy by the woo merchants.

    >
    “One of the most worrying, most urgent groups we need to invest in is young people.

    And thus vulnerable to the woo merchants.

    >
    “We ought to be ashamed of ourselves.”

    Yes; but possibly not for the reason you think.

    >
    Archbishop Sentamu told the Synod: “Compared with evangelism everything else is like rearranging furniture when the house is on fire.
    “Tragically too often that is what we are doing – reorganising the structures, arguing over words and phrases, while the people of England are left floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair.”

    What an arrogant little man Sentamu is, to believe that I, and presumably everyone else who does not buy into his invisible magic man, are floundering in meaningless anxiety and despair.

    I can but hope the government will note the dying twitches of these idiots and finally get rid of the “Lords Spiritual” from the upper house, since they themselves admit they are largely irrelevant in modern Britain.

  14. Christian churches have a big problem that they are completely overlooking. Correct me if I’m wrong…Where in the Bible does it say that you must attend a “brick and mortar” building in order to “keep the Sabbath?” Even more so…where does it say you must go to a religious institution instead of a walk in “God’s creation?” Also, is there anything in the Bible that states that one must follow a religious leader – priest, minister, etc.? What I’m getting at is everything is going online, even college courses. Some institutions even offer courses for free on TV, podcasts, etc. Megachurches are flourishing because they make use of television broadcasts where they get donations in the millions of dollars.

    Let’s face it, most churches are boring. (My previous church was not. )The best ways of keeping the money flowing is to have committed people either through regular attendance, required attendance, or massive viewership. Most small time ministers are not dynamic enough to captivate thousands or even hundreds of thousands. Economics will rule their future. It is likely that the most charming will thrive in person while others will be looking for another profession if they are not tech savvy.

    Here’s a challenge to the religious: Go ahead and preach and evangelize on the internet and elsewhere. Offer your services free of any tithe and you can ask for year end donations instead of the “Your cheating God by not tithing” threats that are used to guilt followers into paying. Maybe you will become a blogger who spends your extra time creating a site just for the love of your interest with no expectation of getting money. You will lose your parsonage allowance and other tax perks – even your income. I have been on sites where you can tell the blogger absolutely loves what they are doing. They freely share what they know and even will email you if you ask a question. Yes, some of these blogs have progressed to being lucrative endeavors while others do it just to share their enthusiasm. Why not give it a try. If you run into any challenges, just ask your friendly atheist tech person for help. Atheist have been online for quite some time now and managed to deconvert me – free of charge. :D

    • In reply to #37 by QuestioningKat:

      Christian churches have a big problem that they are completely overlooking. Correct me if I’m wrong…Where in the Bible does it say that you must attend a “brick and mortar” building in order to “keep the Sabbath?” Even more so…where does it say you must go to a religious institution instead of a…

      You’ve put your finger on a quite overlooked problem there.

      What most people believe in isn’t a god, its a religion. The smoke and mirrors used to entertain the sheep are more important than the religion itself. This is why priests (who make their living from the money donated to their church) spend so much time telling people that their church is the only true path to God (in the financial sector this would be at least a conflict of interests, and probably insider dealing, fraud and money laundering) and have to encourage the followers to turn up every week and violate part of their dogma

      In the Bible Jesus tells people they should pray privately and without ostentatious displays of piety, but if everyone did that the people who run churches would be out of a job so they have to come up with ever more elaborate shows to promote their snake oil.

      Faithheads like to talk about “a personal relationship with God” but no organised religion actually wants that, because it would destroy organised religion.

      A personal relationship with God means a person doesn’t require a priest, or a priesthood, or churches, and it especially doesn’t require a holy book.

  15. “We ought to be ashamed of ourselves.”

    We agree but not unsurprisingly from different premises.

    He warned against relying on “more gimmicks” to revive the Church’s fortunes adding: “The most urgent and worrying gap is in young peoples work.

    Heartening to see you won’t be trying the summer jeebus boot camps with Miss Trunchball scaring the crap out of 5 year olds

    “So many churches have no ministry to young people and that means they have no interest in the future.

    Nice to see you’ve lost your grip altogether but weak tea and sponge cake tend to appeal to old ladies.

    “As I have repeated many times in the past we are one generation away from extinction.

    I am so saddened that I will not live to see you turning the lights out.

    “We have to give cogent reasons to young people why the Christian faith is relevant to them.”

    Such as?

  16. Typical Sunday congregations have almost halved since 1970 to just 807,000 in the most recent figures.

    But they still have 26 bishops in the House of Lords. Shouldn’t that now be thirteen?

  17. “… people don’t see churches as places where great things happen.”

    Could that be because nothing ever happens? Nothing has happened for 2000 years and even those “great things” of biblical times are questionable.

    • In reply to #52 by rod-the-farmer:

      I am thinking of having a t-shirt made….floundering in meaningless anxiety and despairThat should get a conversation started. Street epistemologists, place your orders here.

      Yep – my first thought too. What a slogan…

  18. Clergy are now gripped by a “feeling of defeat”, congregations are worn down by “heaviness” while the public simply greets both with “rolled eyes and a yawn of boredom”, he said.

    Since the “Lord’s day Observance” shower, were resoundingly defeated, and the church Sunday monopoly broken, there are just so many other useful and entertaining things to do – rather that sitting in pews, listening to the deluded ramblings of preachers or biblical mythology.

    Relaxing reading, odd jobs around the house and garden , playing with children and helping them learn and develop, trips to the countryside, Sunday football, TV, Socialising with friends. – The list goes on!

    These activities – rather than listening to tedious pontificating preachers of delusion and ignorance! -

    NO CONTEST!

  19. Why is there something rather than nothing ??? All the nothing is happening in churches all over the UK….
    UK is clearly voicing our preference for real estate not religion …we need Houses not churches…

    • In reply to #56 by Light Wave:

      UK is clearly voicing our preference for real estate not religion …we need Houses not churches…

      You wouldn’t believe all the acreage wasted with u.s. mega-churches – building itself, parking lot, manicured lawns, big enough for an aircraft landing carrier. Their priorities are so screwed up.

  20. Christianity is just a “generation away from extinction”

    Hm. The sky’s been about to fall for an awfully long time. Xians thrive on being “under threat”. There will continue to be such for centuries. What will change is how Christianity is interpreted, and not necessarily for the better. There will be revivals, ups and downs. A monotonic decrease is implausible and (I think) unprecedented.

    old toy boy said:

    This is what they said about the slave trade

    There are still slaves.

  21. “Tragically too often that is what we are doing – reorganising the structures, arguing over words and phrases, while the people of England are left floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair.”

    Interesting that the view from the CoE is that people of England “are left floundering amid meaningless anxiety and despair”. Is this true? Are people depressed, anxious, worried, because there is no CoE presence? Doubtful. People being indifferent of the CoE does not equal despair. Instead, likely, it reflects the attitude that people are tired of that institution. I think it is interesting how the CoE leaders believe that without them, there is chaos. I wonder, have things gotten better in England during this generation, or worse? Is it better because of a lack of CoE attendence?

  22. there are just so many other useful and entertaining things to do – rather that sitting in pews, listening to the deluded ramblings of preachers or biblical mythology.

    Imagine sitting in a pew listening to Greek and Egyptian mythology…hearing the same messages year after year….no wonder there are nuts who try to find special meanings and messages. It’s like watching the same series of movies over and over…you need to keep digging to find something different in order to justify why your spending so much time. Taking the story at face value just doesn’t cut it. If people would only put the woo aside, they would realize that there are libraries filled with way better stories that have positive messages that ask nothing from them.

  23. Christianity won’t die out. Its bloodline will continue in Asia. A religion with a system as effective as vampirism…this blood cult will see new hope in Asia. A godhead with eternal life blood which promises eternal life to those who inherit this bloodline. It takes more than a stake to kill this one. His minions like irritating vampires is supposed to spread the theism virus not by biting its prey but by evangelism. Whenever i hear of eternal life atoned of sins by Jesus blood….i can’t help seeing a horde of baloneys frollicking in a blood pool drinking a toast to one another to eternal life. If islam and christianity can share the same angel gabriel….they are the same religion for all I care. It is impossible for the same angel to serve two different gods. No matter which one we jump out of and jump into…..its the same old warlike….sinister….brainwashing…..BLOODY religion. Asians are a shame. They always like to take over what the west wants to discard

  24. Even if christianity wouldn’t have had so many scandals in the past, people would still leave this indoctrination system, because, first of all it is based on unproven hypotheses, and second, the fact that we all have a tendency to be free. The problem is that all the other religions will live on a little bit more.

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