Interests of child trump religion in new Israeli adoption bill

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Under the proposed legislation, parents seeking to adopt a non-Jewish child may no longer have to prove they are leading an observant lifestyle.

Parents adopting non-Jewish children in Israel may no longer have to prove an observant lifestyle as a condition for finalizing the adoption, under a bill approved on Sunday by the Ministerial Committee for Legislation. The bill would amend the Adoption Law.

The amendment would give the court approving the adoption the right to prefer “the best interests of the child” over religious considerations in the adoption process.

Under current law, Jewish parents who adopt a non-Jewish child are supposed to convert the child to Judaism through a special rabbinical court under the auspices of the rabbinate. The conversion becomes official only after a probation period set by the rabbinate, and the adoption does not become final until the conversion is completed.

Written By: Jonathan Lis
continue to source article at haaretz.com

13 COMMENTS

  1. Israel makes no bones it is a theocracy and that Orthodox Jews have special privileged status. It is interesting seeing them move to a more secular view while Americans move to a more theocratic view.

    • In reply to #1 by Roedy:

      Israel makes no bones it is a theocracy and that Orthodox Jews have special privileged status. It is interesting seeing them move to a more secular view while Americans move to a more theocratic view.

      From what I have read the ordinary Israelis are starting to see the orthodox for what they really are. A parasitic organism draining the life blood of the host. They over produce offspring, feed off the host and give nothing back in return.

      A host (Israel) can only survive so long allowing that parasite to take over.

      • In reply to #2 by Aber ration:

        In reply to #1 by Roedy:

        Israel makes no bones it is a theocracy and that Orthodox Jews have special privileged status. It is interesting seeing them move to a more secular view while Americans move to a more theocratic view.

        From what I have read the ordinary Israelis are starting to see the orthodox for what they really are.

        Cognitive dissonance at is finest since it is the orthodox’s belief that their god gave the land of Israel to the Jews which has in no small part driven the justification for the existence of the State of Israel in the first place and contributes to maintaining the Peace Process™ as precisely that -eternally a process, or, as cynics would have it: conquest by negotiation.

  2. Under current law, Jewish parents who adopt a non-Jewish child are supposed to convert the child to Judaism through a special rabbinical court under the auspices of the rabbinate.

    So presumably this involves the circumcision of non-Jewish male children!

    In practical terms, it would be in the interests of the child to avoid conversion, and so avoid unnecessary mutilation.

  3. ” the good of the child does not require a careful examination of the parents’ religious practices.’

    Seems to me, it should.And if the parent is religious, alarm bells should go off. Just kidding,or not…it depends on the kind of religion the would- be parent practises.Shocking though that being an observant Jew should have been a condition.

    It is infuriating and heartbreaking to think of children who have suffered and even died died at the hands of religious people.I’m thinking of Christians now, the case of Hana ,for example.

    A thorough inspection of people wishing to adopt is necessary ,and being religious should definitely not be seen as a point in favour of the adopters.

    • In reply to #6 by Christiana Magdalene Moodley:

      .Shocking though that being an observant Jew should have been a condition.

      Suprising isn’t it? And so little known. Imaging the massive fecal storm that this would set off if parents adopting non-Christian children in the US or Europe would have had to prove an observant Christian lifestyle as a condition for adopting.

      Another example of how Judaism is every bit the beneficiary of the accomodationism exempting religion from rational scrutiny and equality before the law. Except they seem to get away with it more by skillful playing of the antisemitism card and the virtual complete lock-down (in the US main-stream media) on any critique of Israel or Judaism.

  4. Why can’t religiously non-Jewish parents adopt a genetically Jewish child? Jewish kids are cute! I’m sure there are many Jewish secularists willing to adopt. The orphaned children of frummies don’t necessarily have to grow up that way.

    • In reply to #7 by Peter Grant:

      Why can’t religiously non-Jewish parents adopt a genetically Jewish child?

      There’s no such thing as being genetically Jewish. If I may state the obvious, there is also no such thing as being genetically Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, Muslim or Hindu. The difference between ethnicity and religion is simple: It’s impossible to change one’s ethnicity but extremely easy to change one’s religion.

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