This incredible film of Saturn was made with one million still photos

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Our friend Val Klavans sent me this teaser trailer for the outstanding In Saturn's Rings, a truly incredible look into the most photogenic planet in the solar system. Please support their Kickstarter project to fund the soundtrack for the film: the recordings of Samuel Barber's "Adagio for Strings" by the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.

In Saturn's Rings is a ground-breaking film for IMAX and Giant Screen Theaters and Fulldome Planetariums created from over one million real photographsand assembled in one man's basement studio. Using a unique photoanimationtechnique, the film will take audiences on a journey through the Solar System and beyond, employing images from dozens of space missions, including Cassini-Huygens, Hubble, Apollo, Voyager 1/2 and many more.

Written By: Jesus Diaz
continue to source article at sploid.gizmodo.com

13 COMMENTS

  1. My problem with the film was orientation. I was always asking “Where am I?” “How did I get here”. It felt like being a ball on one of those elastic string bats, smacked around the galaxy.

    • In reply to #1 by Roedy:

      My problem with the film was orientation. I was always asking “Where am I?” “How did I get here”. It felt like being a ball on one of those elastic string bats, smacked around the galaxy.

      It certainly jumped around a lot. That would be confusing for anyone who could not rapidly recognise the objects in the photographs from prior knowledge.

  2. The music is great, but I found this trailer more wondrous to watch in silence. I had the same problem with orientation that Roedy mentions, though I trust this is because the trailer shows disconnected snippets from the film.

    • In reply to #3 by Cairsley:

      The music is great, but I found this trailer more wondrous to watch in silence. I had the same problem with orientation that Roedy mentions, though I trust this is because the trailer shows disconnected snippets from the film.

      Funny, I was thinking the exact same thing. I really love this music a lot. The Adagio for strings though is one of those pieces of music (Also Sprach Zarathustra by Strauss is another example) that if I were King of the World I would decree they could never be used as the soundtrack for anything ever again. It’s such beautiful music but it gets over used so much. I just want to close my eyes and listen to it, not use it as elevator music for a video.

        • In reply to #9 by Cairsley:

          In reply to #5 by Red Dog:

          “… I just want to close my eyes and listen to it, not use it as elevator music for a video.”

          I totally agree. Good music is for listening to.

          It probably has to do with my innate shallowness, but I’ve never been able just to sit and enjoy music that way. I always have to be doing something else, like reading a magazine or filling out a crossword.

          I agree that great music should not be up for grabs just because the copyright has expired and the work is now in the public domain. Particularly if its primary exploiters are the soulless bastards who work in advertising. There should be some sort of heritage society which, sort of like what happens with historically important architecture, prevents corporate assh#les from acquiring classic music and ruining it forever by using it as the soundtrack to their commercials for hemorrhoid ointment or pancakes & sausage on a stick.

          Would Antonín Dvořák really have given permission for his Symphony No. 9 in E minor to be used in a British advertising campaign for fu#king loaves of bastarding bread?

          • In reply to #10 by Katy Cordeth:

            “It probably has to do with my innate shallowness, but I’ve never been able just to sit and enjoy music that way. I always have to be doing something else, like reading a magazine or filling out a crossword. …”

            No need to be so hard on yourself, Katy. How you like listening to music is how you like listening to music, and there can be no dispute about that.

            I agree with the sentiment behind the idea of a society charged with protecting culturally significant music from being put to demeaning uses, but of course it would be hard to justify the restraints that such a society might try to impose from time to time on freedom of expression (which even soulless advertisers have a right to). On what basis would such decisions be made? Taste?

          • In reply to #11 by Cairsley:

            In reply to #10 by Katy Cordeth:

            I agree with the sentiment behind the idea of a society charged with protecting culturally significant music from being put to demeaning uses, but of course it would be hard to justify the restraints that such a society might try to impose from time to time on freedom of expression (which even soulless advertisers have a right to). On what basis would such decisions be made? Taste?

            Definitely taste. I would suggest a worldwide independent body be set up, composed of aficionados and other experts in the field. Whenever a request was submitted for permission to use a particular bit of music as accompaniment for a movie or advert or whatever, this body would review the work and only if it was as uplifting to the senses as the piece being solicited would approval be granted.

            That would be the criterion by which these things were determined: artistic equivalency. A difficult thing to quantify, but not to judge; particularly if you err on the side of caution.

            This could be applied to other genres too. Literature, for example. If the individuals responsible for the Big Brother television phenomenon had been unable to secure rights to the term from George Orwell’s seminal novel, and because of this the worldwide franchise bearing that name had never come about, how much better would things be today? For one thing, viewers in the UK would never have been subjected to this.

            If your Disney movie based on The Three Musketeers, featuring Justin Bieber as the voice of D’Artagnan and the Cardassian sisters as Athos, Porthos and Aramis isn’t up to scratch, it doesn’t get a release. New television show based on the works of P.G. Wodehouse, with Kelsey Grammer as Jeeves, Snoop Dogg as Bertie Wooster and an animatronic Madeline Bassett? Not a chance in hell.

            Anything by Dan Brown, James Patterson or Yann Martel: absolutely. You don’t even have to pay the authors.

          • In reply to #12 by Katy Cordeth:

            I heartily agree with you, but I suspect such a project would amount to too much censorship for some and freedom of expression might become an issue as well. But thanks for the laughs!

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