While MP pushes for change, poll shows most people oppose laws allowing school anti-gay bias

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Two-thirds of NSW people are opposed to laws allowing private schools to discriminate against or expel students on the basis of their sexuality, a phone poll has revealed.

 

But groups representing many private and religious schools warn that if a bill to change the law is successful, it could threaten their religious freedom and leave them open to litigation for operating the schools in accordance with their faith.

Sydney MP Alex Greenwich has put a private member's bill before the NSW Parliament to amend the Anti-Discrimination Act and remove the exemption for private schools prohibiting the expulsion of students because they are gay.

Sixty-six per cent of respondents to an automated phone poll commissioned by Mr Greenwich and conducted by Reachtel last week said they did not support the present laws, while 18 per cent did support them and 16 per cent were undecided. Of the 1200 people surveyed, 72 per cent did not know private schools were allowed to discriminate against students on the basis of sexuality, marriage status and disability.

Written By: Josephine Tovey
continue to source article at smh.com.au

10 COMMENTS

  1. “remove the exemption for private schools prohibiting the expulsion”

    Does that mean he wants to expel gay students? The writer’s triple negative has this reader confused.

    • In reply to #1 by God fearing Atheist:

      “remove the exemption for private schools prohibiting the expulsion”

      Does that mean he wants to expel gay students? The writer’s triple negative has this reader confused.

      what triple negative? It’s perfectly clear – and good english!

    • In reply to #1 by God fearing Atheist:

      “remove the exemption for private schools prohibiting the expulsion”

      Does that mean he wants to expel gay students? The writer’s triple negative has this reader confused.

      Agreed, it is utter rubbish English/logic. Sure it may be clear to some people, that is because they cannot see the ambiguity.

      I think what is meant is that, at the moment, some priviate schools have the right to discriminate, Other people are saying that even they should not be alowed to discriminate. (can’t be certain).

  2. Rewriting-

    Sydney MP Alex Greenwich has put a private member’s bill before the NSW Parliament to amend the Anti-Discrimination Act and remove the exemption for private schools prohibiting the expulsion of students because they are gay.

    as

    Sydney MP Alex Greenwich has put a private member’s bill before the NSW Parliament to amend the Anti-Discrimination Act and remove the exemption for private schools THEREBY prohibiting the expulsion of students because they are gay.

    better gets the intended meaning I think…unless I got it exactly wrong…

    • In reply to #3 by phil rimmer:

      Rewriting- ….to remove the exemption which now allows private schools to expell students who are …….

      No wonder we are confused. This type of lawyer-speak, in the original quote, is what gets us in to trouble in the first place.

      Sydney MP Alex Greenwich has put a private member’s bill before the NSW Parliament to amend the Anti-Discrimination Act and remove the exemption for private schools prohibiting the expulsion of students because they are gay.

      as

      Sydney MP Alex Greenwich has put a private member’s bill b…

      And the funky quote system here got me even more confused I actually wrote …. To remove the exemption which now allows private schools to expel students who are …..

      I think I should get another shot of Jack Daniels’ delicious libation.

  3. There are two quite different things: your sexual orientation and whether you have sex with people of the same gender.

    The first cannot be justified on religious grounds. The biblical punishment is based on acts not thoughts.

  4. These religious schools get government funding, the churches that own them operate tax free and then they want exemption from laws that the rest of society have to abide by or pay the penalty? Perhaps they’ll want exemption from murder laws so they can stone gays to death, as is the command of their god.

    At present, religious schools are allowed to discriminate against homosexuals and the disabled (even though these are both illegal for the rest of society in NSW). That sounds to me like the start of Hitler’s extermination list. I wonder when they will add witches, gypsies, fortune tellers, non-believers and those of opposing beliefs?

    Christianity? Humm…Not very Christian, or perhaps it is.

  5. Here is a case where the conflict between superstition and reality is observed. Should the law be based on superstitious beliefs or on real facts? Should religious people be exempt from legal requirements based on facts of the world in order to be able to act in accordance with their superstitions? It seems to me that, if the religious want the government to be involved in the funding of their schools, they have to abide by the laws passed by the government. They are free to believe what they like, but they are not free to break the just laws of the land. If they want to punish or expel a student because he or she is gay, not only should they not receive funding from the government, they should not even be allowed to run a school. Let them then send their children to a state school and run bible classes or whatever on Sundays if they must indoctrinate their children (as, unfortunately, they are entitled to do).

    As an aside, you do have to wonder whether Jesus was gay (although that term is problematic when applied so anachronistically). Nevertheless, it was very unusual for a Jewish man to be without a wife at the age of thirty; and Jesus seems to have got on well with women, which is usually the case with gay men (it was highly unusual for a man in that time and place to associate with women he was not related to as freely and approachably as is indicated of Jesus in the Gospels). The evidence, of course, is scant, but one cannot help wondering …

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