2 Pussy Riot Members Released From Prison

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Two jailed members of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot were released Monday following an amnesty law that both described as a Kremlin public relations stunt ahead of the Winter Olympics.

Maria Alekhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were granted amnesty last week in a move largely viewed as the Kremlin's attempt to soothe criticism of Russia's human rights record ahead of the Winter Olympics in Sochi in February.

The third member, Yekaterina Samutsevich, was released on a suspended sentence months after all three were found guilty of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred and sentenced to two years in prison for the performance at Moscow's main cathedral in March 2012.

The band members said their protest was meant to raise their concern about increasingly close ties between the state and the church.

Written By: Alexander Roslyakov and Nataliya Vasilyeva
continue to source article at abcnews.go.com

19 COMMENTS

    • In reply to #1 by Katy Cordeth:

      The time she spent in prison hasn’t diminished Nadezhda’s beauty one iota.

      Nor her brave spirit-

      “I’m calling for a boycott of the Olympic Games,” Tolokonnikova said. “What is happening today — releasing people just a few months before their term expires — is a cosmetic measure.”

      • In reply to #4 by phil rimmer:

        In reply to #1 by Katy Cordeth:

        The time she spent in prison hasn’t diminished Nadezhda’s beauty one iota.

        Nor her brave spirit-

        “I’m calling for a boycott of the Olympic Games,” Tolokonnikova said. “What is happening today — releasing people just a few months before their term expires — is a cos…

        Somebody needs to call Joss Whedon or Zack Snyder or whoever’s responsible for producing those movies and tell them they’ve found their Wonder Woman.

        Seriously, what could be more subversive than a Russian, this Russian, playing the most iconic American female superhero of them all?

  1. if Putin thinks this will fool anyone then he’s the biggest fool of all.

    I hope this politically cynical behaviour increases the likelihood of there being a huge boycott of the winter Olympics.

    Although it’d be tough on the athletes, on balance, human rights come first.

  2. What Pussy Riot did – singing a political protest song laced with obscenities in a church – was in extreme bad taste. I wouldn´t want it to happen in King´s College Chapel. But bad taste isn´t against the law, and that isn´t why they ended up behind bars. They were gaoled because they offended ex-communist-KGB-colonel Putin, who has now climbed into bed with the Russian Orthodox church which he once officially despised because he knows that a lot of Russians still vote the way their priest tells them to. And by the way, Katy Cordeth, what you say about Nedezhda´s beauty may be true, but if that´s all you could think of to say, then you´re only trivializing the whole affair.

    • In reply to #8 by Brian Fieldhouse:

      What Pussy Riot did – singing a political protest song laced with obscenities in a church – was in extreme bad taste. I wouldn´t want it to happen in King´s College Chapel. But bad taste isn´t against the law, and that isn´t why they ended up behind bars. They were gaoled because they offended ex-co…

      Not sure about the ‘bad taste’ statement- respect for religion is ludicrous in my view and privileges given are repugnant.

      • In reply to #10 by Fritz:

        In reply to #8 by Brian Fieldhouse:

        What Pussy Riot did – singing a political protest song laced with obscenities in a church – was in extreme bad taste. I wouldn´t want it to happen in King´s College Chapel. But bad taste isn´t against the law, and that isn´t why they ended up behind bars. They we…

        Dear Fritz,

        You misunderstand. We may not be religious, but others have the right to be so and to be allowed to pursue their devotions uninterrupted, just as I have the right to listen to an opera or symphony concert without its being interrupted by a punk band. You might not share my taste in music, but as long as it´s doing you no harm, live with it. It´s not called privilege, but tolerance.

        • In reply to #12 by Brian Fieldhouse:

          In reply to #10 by Fritz:

          In reply to #8 by Brian Fieldhouse:

          What Pussy Riot did – singing a political protest song laced with obscenities in a church – was in extreme bad taste. I wouldn´t want it to happen in King´s College Chapel. But bad taste isn´t against the law, and that isn´t why they en…

          Hey, Brian. There wasn’t a service going on in the church at the time. Is it acceptable to sing an obscenity-filled song in an almost empty house of worship?

    • In reply to #8 by Brian Fieldhouse:

      …And by the way, Katy Cordeth, what you say about Nedezhda´s beauty may be true, but if that´s all you could think of to say, then you´re only trivializing the whole affair.

      Sorry, Brian, but I’m a trivial sort of gal. Consider me well and truly telt though.

      Did you get my limerick?

  3. I’m not sure this was wholly a “publicity stunt” – it is barely a week since the Russian Supreme Court said the court in the original trial had failed to prove any guilt.

    There is (some) hope for the Russian legal system still.

    Either way, it’s great that they are out for Christmas.

    • In reply to #9 by Stevehill:

      I’m not sure this was wholly a “publicity stunt” – it is barely a week since the Russian Supreme Court said the court in the original trial had failed to prove any guilt.

      There is (some) hope for the Russian legal system still.

      Either way, it’s great that they are out for Christmas.

      Perhaps I’m too suspicious but I don’t have your confidence in the Russian judicial system. I think it’s quite likely that the Supreme Court ruled that way because they got the message that that was the way they were supposed to rule. Those kinds of messages can be delivered in all sorts of ways, the most extreme being Polonium in the soup for those who don’t go along.

  4. I find myself overcome with emotion for all the amnestied prisoners. I once spent a night in a foreign jail on a trumped up charge of assaulting the police, and I was in a right state. The handcuffs, the solitary confinement, the deliberate lack of information and the rest of the grubby jail protocols grind ordinary people into the dirt in seconds. If you are looking for justice, you have to rely on there being enough good people working on the inside to do the right thing. I’m afraid in Russia, there aren’t enough of them.

  5. Maria Alekhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova are two very brave women. CHAPEAU!!! They are still fighting Putin regime – bravo! If only western countries (athletes) would hear what is she saying and stay by her side in boycotting the games. That would be a real fight for freedom. :)

  6. It’s really shocking that people are being jailed for blasphemy in Russia. The number of countries where blasphemy is a criminal offence is something that should engage the attention of secularists everywhere.

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