Angola accused of ‘banning’ Islam as mosques closed

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Angola has been accused of "banning" Islam after shutting down most of the country's mosques amid reports of violence and intimidation against women who wear the veil.

The Islamic Community of Angola (ICA) claims that eight mosques have been destroyed in the past two years and anyone who practises Islam risks being found guilty of disobeying Angola's penal code.

Human rights activists have condemned the wide-ranging crackdown. "From what I have heard, Angola is the first country in the world that has decided to ban Islam," said Elias Isaac, country director of the Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa (Osisa). "This is a crazy madness. The government is intolerant of any difference."

Officials in the largely Catholic southern African nation insist that worldwide media reports of a "ban" on Islam are exaggerated and no places of worship are being targeted.

Written By: Aristides Cabeche and David Smith
continue to source article at theguardian.com

19 COMMENTS

  1. anyone who practises Islam risks being found guilty of disobeying Angola’s penal code.

    Islam violates the penal code of every non-islamic civilized country.

    Human rights activists have condemned the wide-ranging crackdown…. “This is a crazy madness. The government is intolerant of any difference.”

    The Stupid! It burns!

  2. In reply to #3 by Alan4discussion:

    This is not about liberating people from Islamic Sharia! It is about competition between Islam and the more dominant RCC for domination of the population!

    It’s true. Catholicism is milder strain of faith virus than Islam, nowadays. They are not hanging the blasphemers and atheists.

    • In reply to #5 by Peter Grant:

      Bloody Catholics! See, this is what they do when you give them their “religious freedom”.

      In a different context I would have agreed with your words. But our government here in Angola is secular, and we have a constitution that guarantees that. All religious denominations have to go through a legalilzing process here and many have not been granted licenses to build or take money from people, some of which are christian. They can pray or do whatever they want though. They just don’t get any benefits from the stateor the people. I think we have a good system.

      • In reply to #8 by Godslayer:

        All religious denominations have to go through a legalilzing process here and many have not been granted licenses to build or take money from people, some of which are christian.

        Are they tax exempt?

        I think we have a good system.

        It sounds better than most, I’m just a bit wary of giving religion any legal status whatsoever.

  3. Religious organisations are required to apply for accreditation in Angola, which currently recognises 83, all of them Christian.

    I don’t see how any religion can obtain legal recognition. The whole point of the law is to ignore religion, it’s just not relevant.

    • In reply to #6 by Peter Grant:

      Religious organisations are required to apply for accreditation in Angola, which currently recognises 83, all of them Christian.

      I don’t see how any religion can obtain legal recognition. The whole point of the law is to ignore religion, it’s just not relevant.

      Not too long ago there was a religious accident here involving a big christian denomination. People died, and the government started to really pay attention to what was already the law to avoid people organizing events with too many people which they cannot really control. The law here ignores religion for the most part; you can believe what you want, and pray to whichever gods you want, but you cannot simply make yourself a free tax institution and make money off people. Unfrotunately religion still wins by the numbers here and everywhere else. As long as you have enough people you can start a religion, so to me it should ignored even less. I want a time when we listen to what they say and if it is wrong it is wrong: no religion for you. Next!

  4. “There is no official position that targets the destruction or closure of places of worship, whichever they are.”

    Well that’s a mercy anyhow, all they have to worry about now is the unofficial position

    “We can say that Islam has been banned in Angola. You need 100,000 to be recognised as a religion or officially you cannot pray.”

    There’s that officially word sneaked in again.

  5. “anyone who practises Islam risks being found guilty of disobeying Angola’s penal code.”

    Anyone here can practice whatever religion they want they just can’t all be granted licenses for building churches we need the space for better things.

    • In reply to #17 by Miserablegit:

      Oooooh they are trying to ban our religion, let’s burn a flag that will show them we mean business.

      You should be grateful if they stick to burning flags and don’t start sending drone missiles your way.

  6. Hmmm, the “Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa,” seems to be a branch of US billionaire George Soros’ Open Society mob – in which case the article was probably written in Washington or New York as a means of furthering the geopolitical agenda of the US ruling class.

    Angola is, after all, happy to trade with China, which makes Uncle Sam very, very angry – I imagine he hopes that reports of religious friction within the country might send the Chinese scuttling back home, leaving the field wide open…

    [Warning: irony]

    And then there is Uncle’s responsibility to protect a persecuted minority against a crazy intolerant government – just like he did in Iraq and Libya and is now doing in Syria!

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