New Harris Poll On Religion In America

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A new Harris Poll released today reveals that only 74% of Americans believe in God, an 8% decline since 2009.

Before today, U.S. adults had remained fairly consistent in their religious beliefs — 82% of U.S. respondents previously reported that they believed there was a God since 2005.

In another decline, only 54% of Americans are now "absolutely certain" in God's existence, a 12% decrease over the last decade.

Not all of us feel this way. The groups most likely to be certain of God's existence are Black Americans (70%), Republicans (65%), Baby Boomers (60%), Southerners (61%), and Midwesterners (58%), as well as anyone with a high school education or less (60%).

Written By: Megan Willett
continue to source article at businessinsider.com

14 COMMENTS

  1. “Nearly one-fourth of Americans (23%) identify themselves as “not at all” religious – a figure that has nearly doubled since 2007, when it was at 12%”.
    Double in 6 years, ….it requires repeating, Double in 6 years !!!

  2. It’s good to see the reduction in woo in the younger generation, but some of those figures are frightening in a technically advanced nation.

    60%+ holding many of these childish irrational beliefs.

  3. Could someone put together a graph overlaying the percentage of self-identified religious believers in the population against the number of times republicans get the word “atheists” into news headlines over time?

    I’m guessing there’s some sort of correlation just not sure if it inverse squared or cubed

  4. Encouraging that the figures are moving in the right direction, but still depressing that they are moving at a glacial rate (well, a glacial rate for my liking anyway)…

    It’s doubly depressing that there are still less than half (49%) of young adults that ‘believe’ in Evolution by Natural Selection (10% less than the number that believe in Angels for crying out loud)…

    The US still has such a long way to go… :-(

  5. It is generally believed that surveys conducted by live interviewers tend to exaggerate the numbers of people who report the socially desirable, or less embarrassing, behavior,

    Yep. Religion is a badge of goodness, particularly in the US. Sadly, this change in polling method creates a little discontinuity in the data. The rate of change may be less than imagined. On the upside disbelief may have been more common than imagined before.

  6. Give me your tired, your poor,

    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

    The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,

    And I will infect them with religion.

    • I thought I remembered reading a similar comment some time ago. And you made it. 2250 is not that small. Look up sample size and statistical significance. And not to be jerk, but the first sentence of the article states it was an online poll.

      In reply to #8 by holysmokes:

      Although this poll is encouraging, the number of people surveyed (2250) seems to be a bit too tiny for accurate results. I am curious as to how and where they conducted the poll.

    • In reply to #8 by holysmokes:

      Although this poll is encouraging, the number of people surveyed (2250) seems to be a bit too tiny for accurate results. I am curious as to how and where they conducted the poll.

      In my understanding 2250 people, if sampled correctly, is enough for statistically significant results. While one might think that more than 2250 people should be included when talking about a population of 317 million people, it’s actually not necessary. But I’m not a statistician, so don’t take my word for it.

      Then I just want to add that now is not the time to become complacent. Not for a second should we think that the job is done. Now more than ever should we keep pushing for change, since the ball has clearly started rolling.

  7. Another trend that I find encouraging is what is happening to the buildings themselves.

    Googling “New uses for churches” finds all sorts of highly creative and architecturally brilliant uses for an increasing myriad of churches that can no longer attract a flock sufficient to sustain them. In the vast majority of cases these are not buildings that have been replaced by bigger better ones, they are churches that simply could no longer support themselves, even without paying taxes.

    They have been recycled into spectacular restaurants, libraries, law courts, offices, and even a basket-ball court. At a modest level,
    I know of a small church in Western Canada that is now a bike shop.

    I for one have no desire to see the magnificent buildings that were erected in the religious age destroyed by neglect in an age that has increasingly less use for their original purpose, nor will I cease to be moved by the beauty of much of the music, despite it’s being written in praise of a non existent mythical being. Let’s face it the librettos of most operas are nearly equally silly. That does not stop the music being wonderful.

    Humanity is way to clever not to get past this absurdity, but slow progress will set the foundations of change in stone, like the cathedrals themselves. Wishing widespread rational thought into existence too quickly invites the kind of backwards social conflict that accompanies most revolutions.

    Don’t forget the story of the old bull and the young bull.

  8. In reply to #8 by holysmokes:

    Although this poll is encouraging, the number of people surveyed (2250) seems to be a bit too tiny for accurate results. I am curious as to how and where they conducted the poll.

    In my understanding 2250 people, if sampled correctly, is enough for statistically significant results. While one might think that more than 2250 people should be included when talking about a population of 317 million people, it’s actually not necessary. But I’m not a statistician, so don’t take my word for it.

    Then I just want to add that now is not the time to become complacent. Not for a second should we think that the job is done. Now more than ever should we keep pushing for change, since the ball has clearly started rolling.

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