Cassini Solstice Mission: Janus from Afar

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Cassini's narrow angle camera captures Saturn's tiny irregular moon Janus surrounded by the vast, dark expanse of the outer solar system.

Janus (111 miles, or 179 kilometers across) shares an orbit with the moon Epimetheus; the two moons change orbital positions roughly every four years.

This view looks toward the Saturn-facing side of Janus. North on Janus is up and rotated 38 degrees to the left. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 10, 2013.

Written By: NASA
continue to source article at saturn.jpl.nasa.gov

3 COMMENTS

  1. It is important to note that along with NASA, the ESA and ISA are involved with Cassini Mission, too.

    National pride is perfectly understandable – yet, when something is a collaborative effort, it shouldn’t be relegated to the small print. Analogous to a researcher having personal pride in his/her work, at the same time giving credit to those who helped in some way.

  2. @OP Janus (111 miles, or 179 kilometers across) shares an orbit with the moon Epimetheus; the two moons change orbital positions roughly every four years.

    Saturn’s moons and rings are a wonder of Newtonian physics, – With some moons doing resonant orbit-swapping, most showing tidal-locking, some sweeping up ring material, and some producing new rings from cry-volcanism.

    Rings of Saturn
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    The rings have numerous gaps where particle density drops sharply: two opened by known moons embedded within them, and many others at locations of known destabilizing orbital resonances with Saturn’s moons. Other gaps remain unexplained. Stabilizing resonances, on the other hand, are responsible for the longevity of several rings, such as the Titan Ringlet and the G Ring.

    Well beyond the main rings is the Phoebe ring, which is tilted at an angle of 27 degrees to the other rings and, like Phoebe, orbits in retrograde fashion.

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